Atlanta Braves - Baseball Hall of Fame

Hugh Duffy (1945)

Hugh Duffy started playing semi-pro baseball for recreation but in 1886, he turned professional, playing in the minor leagues. After two seasons in the minors, Duffy signed with the Chicago White Stockings of the National League (modern day Cubs). In 1888, his first season in the major leagues, Duffy batted .282 with 84 hits in 71 games.

In 1890, Duffy moved to the Chicago Pirates of the newly formed Players' League. He led the National League in hits that season. When the league folded after just one season, Duffy moved to the Boston Reds of the American Association. One year later, he found himself again in a team that folded so he signed with the Boston Beaneaters/Braves in 1892 and played with them through 1900.

During his years with the Beaneaters, Duffy led the National League in home runs twice (1894, 1897) and hits, doubles, and RBIs in 1894. He won the National League Triple Crown and Batting Title in 1894. That season, he batted .440 with 237 hits, 51 doubles, 16 triples, 18 home runs, 145 RBIs,and 48 stolen bases in 125 games.

In 1901, Duffy joined the Milwaukee Brewers (modern day Baltimore Orioles) as player-manager. The following season, he left the major leagues to be a player-manager of a team in the Western League. Duffy returned to the major leagues in 1904 as player-manager for the Philadelphia Phillies, a position he held through the 1906 season. In those last three seasons, Duffy played in a total of just 34 games.

After retiring as a major league player, Duffy had a career as a coach and manager in both the minor and major leagues. From 1910 through 1911, he was manager of the Chicago White Sox. Six years later, he joined Harvard University as a coach. In 1920, after leaving his coaching position at Harvard, Duffy managed in the minor leagues for a year. He then had another stint as a major league manager, this time with the Boston Red Sox. After two years (1921-1922) in that position, Duffy took a year off and then returned to the Red Sox for a very long career (1924-1953) as a scout.

Duffy played in over 100 games in each of 11 seasons (1889-1899). His statistics during that time include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 237 in 1894
  • 3 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 51 in 1894
  • 4 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 16 in 1890 and 1894
  • 8 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with a high of 145 in 1894
  • 8 seasons with over 40 stolen bases, with highs of 78 in 1890 and 85 in 1891
  • 8 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .440 in 1894

Career statistics for Duffy include:

  • 1,737 games played
  • 2,282 hits
  • 325 doubles
  • 119 triples
  • 1,302 RBIs
  • 574 stolen bases
  • .324 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Hugh Duffy
ESPN Sports - Hugh Duffy


Tommy McCarthy (1946)

Tommy McCarthy started his major league career in 1884 as a pitcher and outfielder with the Boston Reds of the short-lived Union Association. He played in 53 games that season and batted .215. The following season, he played in 40 games with the Boston Beaneaters/Braves. From 1886 through 1887, McCarthy played in just 26 games for the Philadelphia Quakers/Phillies.

McCarthy's first full season in the major leagues was in 1888, when he played for the St. Louis Browns (modern day Baltimore Orioles). That season, he batted .274 with 140 hits, 20 doubles, and 93 stolen bases in 131 games. He stayed with the Browns through the 1891 season, serving as player-manager in 1890. His best season with the Browns was 1890, when he batted .350 with 192 hits, 28 doubles, and 83 stolen bases in 133 games.

In 1892, McCarthy returned to the Boston Beaneaters/Braves for four seasons. He spent his last season, 1896, with the Brooklyn Bridegrooms/Dodgers.

McCarthy played in over 100 games in each of 9 seasons (1888-1896). His statistics during that time include:

  • 5 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 192 in 1890
  • 2 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 126 in 1894
  • 6 seasons with over 40 stolen bases, with a high of 93 in 1888
  • 4 seasons with a batting average over .300, with highs of .349 in 1894 and .350 in 1890

Career statistics for McCarthy include:

  • 1,275 games played
  • 1,496 hits
  • 735 RBIs
  • 468 stolen bases
  • .292 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Tommy McCarthy
ESPN Sports - Tommy McCarthy


Kid Nichols (1949)

Kid Nichols started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues before being signed by the Boston Beaneaters/Braves in 1889. In 1890, his first season in the major leagues, Nichols pitched in 48 games with a 27-19 record, 222 strikeouts to 112 walks, and a 2.23 ERA. He stayed with the Beaneaters through the 1901 season. During his time with the Beaneaters, Nichols led the National League in wins three times (1896-1898). He also led the league in shutouts three times.

Nichols left the Beaneaters in 1902 to become a pitcher, manager and part owner of a minor league team. After two seasons in the minors, Nichols returned to the majors as player-manager with the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1905, after pitching in seven games, Nichols was placed on waivers by the Cardinals and claimed by the Philadelphia Phillies. He ended his career with the Phillies, playing in 17 games with them in 1905 and in just 4 games in 1906, his last season in the major leagues.

Statistics for Nichols in 15 seasons (1890-1901, 1904-1906) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 20 wins, with highs of 34 in 1893 and 35 in 1892
  • 3 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 240 in 1891
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.02 in 1904

Career statistics for Nichols include:

  • 620 games played
  • 5,056.1 innings pitched
  • 361-208 win-loss record
  • 1,868 strikeouts to 1,268 walks
  • 2.95 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Kid Nichols
ESPN Sports - Kid Nichols


Rabbit Maranville (1954)

Walter "Rabbit" Maranville started his major league playing career in 1912 with the Boston Braves, playing in 26 games with them that season. In 1913, his first full season in the major leagues, Maranville batted .247 with 141 hits, 13 doubles, 8 triples, and 25 stolen bases in 143 games.

Maranville played with the Braves through 1920, although he played in only 11 games in 1918. He joined the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1921 and played with them for four seasons before moving to the Chicago Cubs in 1925. The following season, Maranville was in Brooklyn, playing with the Robins/Dodgers for one season of just 78 games. He joined the St. Louis Cardinals in 1927 but played in only nine games that season. The next year, he continued with the Cardinals, playing in 112 games.

In 1929, Maranville returned to the Braves. He continued through 1933 as a full-time player with the Braves. He sat out the 1934 season but returned in 1935 to end his major league career with 23 more games with the Braves.

Statistics for Maranville in 21 seasons (1913-1933) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 198 in 1922
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 20 in 1924
  • 6 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 32 in 1916

Career statistics for Maranville include:

  • 2,670 games played
  • 2,605 hits
  • 380 doubles
  • 177 triples
  • 291 stolen bases
  • .258 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Rabbit Maranville
ESPN Sports - Rabbit Maranville


John Clarkson (1963)

John Clarkson came from a baseball family, with two brothers who also pitched in the major leagues. He started his baseball career in semi-pro ball. In 1882, he was signed to the Worchester Ruby Legs of the National League and played in just three games with them before the team folded. The following two seasons, Clarkson played in the minor leagues. In August, 1884, the Chicago White Stockings/Cubs bought Clarkson's contract and he played with the team in 14 games that season.

In 1885, Clarkson's first full season in the major leagues, he played in 70 games with a 53-16 record, 308 strikeouts to 97 walks, and a 1.85 ERA in 623.0 innings. That season, he led the National League in wins and strikeouts, a feat he repeated in 1887 while still with the White Stockings. Clarkson also had the only no hitter of his career with the White Stockings in July, 1885.

Although Clarkson pitched well with the White Stockings, they sold his contract to the Boston Beaneaters/Braves in April, 1888. In his second season with the Beaneaters (1889), Clarkson won the National League Triple Crown for pitchers, leading the National League in ERA, wins, and strikeouts. That season, he had an ERA of 2.73, a 49-19 record, and 284 strikeouts to 203 walks in 620.0 innings in 73 games. He pitched in 200 more innings and in 22 more games than any other major league pitcher in 1889.

In June, 1892, the Beaneaters released Clarkson after 16 games and he signed with the Cleveland Spiders of the National League, a team that folded after the 1899 season. He continued to pitch for Cleveland through the 1894 season.

Statistics for Clarkson in 11 seasons (1884-1894) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 53 in 1885
  • 5 seasons with over 200 strikeouts, with 308 in 1885 and 313 in 1886
  • 6 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.85 in 1885

Career statistics for Clarkson include:

  • 531 games played
  • 4,536.1 innings pitched
  • 328-178 win-loss record
  • 1,978 strikeouts to 1,191 walks
  • 2.81 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - John Clarkson
ESPN Sports - John Clarkson


Warren Spahn (1973)

Warren Spahn was first signed by the Boston Braves in 1940 and after two seasons in the minor leagues, he was called up to the Braves in 1942 at the age of 21. After playing in just four games with an ERA of 5.74, manager Casey Stengel sent Spahn back to the minor leagues for the remainder of the season.

At the end of the 1942 baseball season, Spahn joined the US army and served through World War II. He returned to baseball and the Braves in 1946, playing in 24 games with them. That season he had an 8-5 record with 67 strikeouts to 36 walks and an ERA of 2.94. The next year, Spahn had his first 20 game winning season and he led the National League in ERA.

From 1949 through 1952, Spahn led the National League in strikeouts. He led the league in ERA in 1953. That season he had a 23-7 record with 148 strikeouts to 70 walks and a 2.10 ERA. Four years later (1957), he won the Cy Young award. In 1957, Spahn had a 2.69 ERA and a 21-11 record in 39 games.

In 1960, at the age of 39, Spahn pitched his first of two no-hit games. His second no hitter came one year later. In 1961, he again led the National League in ERA.

Spahn had a terrible year in 1964, ending with a 6-13 record and a 5.29 ERA. After the season ended, the Braves sold his contract to the New York Mets. In 1965, the Mets released Spahn after 20 games with a 4-12 record and 4.36 ERA. He then signed with the San Francisco Giants, ending his major league career after 16 more games.

After retiring as a major league player, Spahn was a pitching coach with the Cleveland Indians and in the minor leagues. He also spent six years coaching for baseball teams in Japan.

Statistics for Spahn in 20 seasons (1946-1965) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 23 in 1953 and 1963
  • 6 seasons with 150 or more strikeouts, with a high of 191 in 1950
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.10 in 1953

Career statistics for Spahn include:

  • 750 games played
  • 5,243.2 innings pitched
  • 363-245 win-loss record
  • 2,583 strikeouts to 1,434 walks
  • 3.09 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Warren Spahn
ESPN - Warren Spahn


Eddie Mathews (1978)

Eddie Mathews began his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1949. He signed with the Boston Braves and first played with them in 1952, his first full season in the major leagues. That season Mathews had a batting average of only .242 but he hit 23 doubles and 25 home runs. The following year was a much better one for Mathews, with 31 doubles, 47 home runs, 135 RBIs, and a batting average of .302.

From 1953 to 1961, Mathews hit at least 30 home runs each season. His numbers fell in the succeeding years until 1965 when he hit 32 home runs. In 1967, Mathews was traded to the Houston Astros and the following year, his last one as a major league player, he was traded to the Detroit Tigers. He played in just 31 games in his last season.

Mathews returned to major league baseball in 1972 as the manager of the Braves, a position he held until 1974. His record as a manager was 149 wins to 161 losses in 311 games.

Statistics for Mathews in 17 seasons (1952-1968) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 182 in 1959
  • 14 seasons with over 20 home runs, with highs of 46 in 1959 and 47 in 1953
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 135 in 1953
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .306 in 1959 and 1961

Career statistics for Mathews include:

  • 2,391 games played
  • 2,315 hits
  • 512 home runs
  • 1,453 RBIs
  • .271 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Eddie Mathews
ESPN - Eddie Mathews
Baseball Reference.com - Eddie Mathews


Hank Aaron (1982)

Hank Aaron, the player who broke Babe Ruth’s home run record and then held the record for 33 years, was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982. Aaron was a favorite with fans and he was selected as an All-Star in all but the first and last years that he played in the major leagues.

Aaron began playing baseball as a child and before finishing high school, Aaron joined a team in the Negro Leagues. In 1952, the Milwaukee Braves bought Aaron's contract. He then spent two seasons in the minor leagues before having his first full season in the major leagues with the Braves.

Aaron started as an outfielder with the Braves in April, 1954. His first year was good, but not spectacular. However, in his second year with the Braves, Aaron batted .314, with 27 home runs and 106 RBIs. The next year, 1956, Aaron’s average was .328 and he won the National League batting title for that year.

In 1957, Aaron won the National League MVP award for batting .322 and leading the league in home runs and RBIs. That season he had 198 hits, 27 doubles, 44 home runs, and 132 RBIs. The following year, Aaron won the first of three consecutive Gold Glove awards.

Aaron stayed with the Braves until 1974. During that time, he won three Gold Gloves (1958-1960) and he led the National League in home runs four times (1957, 1963, 1966, and 1967) and in RBIs four times (1957, 1960, 1963, and 1966). In 1970, Aaron became the first player in major league history to have 3,000 hits and 500 home runs.

On April 8, 1974, Hank Aaron hit his 715th home run, breaking the great Babe Ruth's record. Aaron continued playing baseball for three more seasons, ending his career with 755 home runs. For his last two seasons, he returned to Milwaukee, playing for the Milwaukee Brewers.

Statistics for Aaron in 23 seasons (1954-1976) in the major leagues include:

  • 17 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 223 in 1959
  • 10 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 46 in 1959
  • 20 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 47 in 1971
  • 11 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 132 in 1957
  • 6 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 31 in 1963
  • 14 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .355 in 1959

Career fielding statistics for Aaron as a right fielder include:

  • 2,174 games played
  • 87 errors
  • 178 assists
  • 4,148 putouts
  • .980 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Aaron include:

  • 3,298 games played
  • 3,771 hits
  • 624 doubles
  • 755 home runs
  • 2,297 RBIs
  • 240 stolen bases
  • .305 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Hank Aaron
ESPN - Hank Aaron
Baseball Reference.com - Hank Aaron


Vic Willis (1995)

Vic Willis started his baseball career playing for the University of Delaware in 1897. The following year, he was signed by the Boston Beaneaters/Braves. Willis pitched in 41 games with the Beaneaters in 1898 and he had a 25-13 record with 160 strikeouts to 148 walks and a 2.84 ERA in 311.0 innings.

Willis pitched for the Beaneaters from 1898 through 1905. During that time, he led the National League in ERA in 1899, strikeouts in 1902, and in shutouts twice. He pitched the only no hitter of his career in 1899.

From 1906 through 1909, Willis played with the Pittsburgh Pirates. He also coached at the University of Delaware in 1907 and 1908. He played his last season in the major leagues (1910) with the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1911, Willis was a pitcher in semi-pro baseball.

Statistics for Willis in 13 seasons (1898-1910) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 27 in 1899 and 1902
  • 3 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 225 in 1902
  • 10 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.73 in 1906

Career statistics for Willis include:

  • 513 games played
  • 3,996.0 innings pitched
  • 249-205 win-loss record
  • 1,651 strikeouts to 1,212 walks
  • 2.63 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Vic Willis
ESPN Sports - Vic Willis


Phil Niekro (1997)

Phil Niekro came from a baseball family, with a father who taught both of his sons how to throw a knuckle ball pitch. Phil's younger brother Joe also had a successful career in the major leagues. The two Niekro brothers played on the same team twice in their careers, first in 1973 and 1974 with the Atlanta Braves and again in 1985 with the New York Yankees.

Niekro was signed by the Braves in 1959 but he didn't play with them until 1964, spending several years first in the minor leagues. He was called up in 1964 to pitch 15.0 innings in 10 games with the Braves. Niekro did not become a full-time pitcher in the Braves starting rotation until 1967.

In 1967, Niekro's first full season in the major leagues, he pitched 207.0 innings in 46 games. He led the National League that season in ERA with 1.87 and he had an 11-9 record with 129 strikeouts to 55 walks. Six years later, in 1973, Niekro pitched the only no hitter of his career.

Niekro led the National League in wins twice (1974, 1979) and in strikeouts in 1977. One of his best seasons was 1978 when he had a 19-18 record with 248 strikeouts to 102 walks and an ERA of 2.88 in 44 games. That season he won his first Gold Glove award.

Niekro was an excellent fielder and he won five Gold Glove awards (1978-1980, 1982, 1983). Career fielding statistics for Niekro include:

  • 864 games played
  • 37 errors
  • 878 assists
  • 386 putouts
  • .972 fielding percentage

The Braves released Niekro after the 1983 season and he signed with the New York Yankees. After two seasons with the Yankees, Niekro signed with the Cleveland Indians for the 1986 season. In 1987, Niekro played in 22 games with the Indians, then three games with the Toronto Blue Jays, and his final game in the major leagues with the Atlanta Braves.

Four years after retiring as a major league pitcher, Niekro managed a team in the minor leagues for one season.

Pitching statistics for Niekro in 24 seasons (1964-1987) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 23 in 1969
  • 10 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 262 in 1977
  • 7 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.87 in 1967

Career pitching statistics for Niekro include:

  • 864 games played
  • 5,404.1 innings pitched
  • 318-274 win-loss record
  • 3,342 strikeouts to 1,809 walks
  • 3.35 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Phil Niekro
ESPN - Phil Niekro
Baseball Reference.com - Phil Niekro


Tom Glavine (2014)

Tom Glavine, who played for most of his career with the Atlanta Braves, was first drafted by the Braves in 1984. He played in the Braves' minor league system from 1984 through most of 1987, joining the team for nine games in 1987.

In 1988, his first full season in the major leagues, Glavine pitched 195.1 innings in 34 games and he finished the season with a 7-17 record and a 4.56 ERA. Three years later, he proved to be a much better pitcher, winning his first of two National League Cy Young awards. He led the league in wins in 1991 with 20 (to 11 losses) and he finished the season with a 2.55 ERA and career highs in innings pitched (246.2) and strikeouts (192 to 69 walks). That year, he also won his first of four Silver Slugger awards, batting .230 with 17 hits in 36 games.

Glavine led the National League in wins again in 1993 with 22 wins. Two years later, he won the World Series MVP award. In the 1995 post-season, he pitched 28.0 innings in 4 games and he had a 2-0 record with 19 strikeouts to 9 walks and a 1.61 ERA.

Glavine won his second Cy Young award in 1998, when he again led the National League in wins. He finished the season with a 20-6 record and a career low ERA of 2.47.

In December, 2002, Glavine left the Braves and signed with the New York Mets. In his first season with the Mets, he had a 9-14 record with a 4.52 ERA in 32 games. He improved during his time with the Mets, finishing in 2006 with a 15-7 record and a 3.82 ERA.

Glavine returned to the Braves at the end of his career, signing with them in November, 2007. He had a poor season in 2008, pitching in just 13 games with the Braves and finishing with a 2-4 record and a 5.54 ERA. After four games in the Braves' minor league system in 2009, the team released him on June 3, 2009.

Accomplishments for Glavine in twenty-two seasons in the major leagues include:

  • won National League Cy Young award twice: 1991, 1998
  • won Silver Slugger award four times: 1991, 1995, 1996, 1998
  • won World Series MVP award in 1995
  • led National League in wins five times: 1991-1993, 1998, 2000

Statistics for Glavine in 20 full seasons (1988-2007) in the major leagues include:

  • 17 seasons with over 30 games, with a high of 36 in 1993, 1996, 2002
  • 14 seasons with over 200 innings pitched, with a high of 246.2 in 1991
  • 5 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 192 in 1991
  • 5 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 22 in 1993
  • 6 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.47 in 1998

Career pitching statistics for Glavine include:

  • 682 games played
  • 4,413.1 innings pitched
  • 2,607 strikeouts to 1,500 walks
  • 305-203 win-loss record
  • 3.54 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Tom Glavine
ESPN - Tom Glavine


Greg Maddux (2014)

Greg Maddux, who pitched for the Braves from 1993 through 2003, was first drafted in 1984 by the Chicago Cubs. He played in the Cubs' minor league system from 1984 through part of 1986, joining the Cubs for six games in 1986 at the age of 20.

Maddux pitched in 30 games in 1987, his first full season in the major leagues. He didn't have a good first year, ending with a 6-14 record and a 5.52 ERA, but in his second full season, he had an 18-8 record with a 3.18 ERA.

An outstanding fielder, Maddux won his first of 18 Gold Glove awards in 1990. That year, he made 55 assists and 39 putouts with no errors in 35 games. He finished with a 15-15 record and a 3.46 ERA.

In 1992, Maddux became the National League's top pitcher, winning his first of four consecutive Cy Young awards. That year, he pitched a career high 268.0 innings in 35 games and he finished with a 20-11 record, 199 strikeouts to 70 walks, and a 2.18 ERA. He led the National League in wins, a feat he would repeat two more times (1994, 1995).

Maddux signed a five-year, $28 million contract with the Braves in December, 1992. The following season, he led the National League in ERA and won his second Cy Young award and a fourth Gold Glove. In 1993, he pitched 267.0 innings in 36 games and finished the season with a 20-10 record and a 2.36 ERA. The following season, he again led the league in wins and ERA and he won another Cy Young award and a fifth Gold Glove award. In 1994, he had a career low ERA of 1.56.

Maddux repeated his success of 1994 in 1995, winning the Cy Young award and a Gold Glove and leading the National League in wins and ERA. He finished with a 19-2 record and a 1.63 ERA.

In August, 1997, Maddux became the highest paid player in major league baseball when he signed a five-year, $57.5 million contract extension with the Braves. The following season, he earned his salary with a career high 204 strikeouts to 45 walks, an 18-9 record, and a 2.22 ERA in 34 games.

Maddux returned to the Chicago Cubs in March, 2004. In his first season with the Cubs, he had a 16-11 record with a 4.02 ERA. His numbers in 2005 were poorer, with a 13-15 record and a 4.24 ERA. After 22 games with the Cubs in 2006, they traded him to the Los Angeles Dodgers. He finished the 2006 season with a 15-14 record and a 4.20 ERA.

In December, 2006, Maddux signed a one-year, $10 million contract with the San Diego Padres. After a season and a half with the Padres, he was traded to the Dodgers in August, 2008. He finished his major league career with the Dodgers, retiring in December, 2008.

Accomplishments for Maddux in twenty-three seasons in the major leagues include:

  • won National League Cy Young award four times: 1992-1995
  • won Gold Glove award 18 times: 1990-2002, 2004-2008
  • led National League in wins three times: 1992, 1994, 1995
  • led National League in ERA four times: 1993-1995, 1998

Statistics for Maddux in 22 full seasons (1987-2008) in the major leagues include:

  • 20 seasons with 30 or more games, with a high of 37 in 1991
  • 18 seasons with over 200 innings pitched, with a high of 268.0 in 1992
  • 2 seasons with 20 wins (1992, 1993)
  • 11 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 204 in 1998
  • 10 seasons with an ERA of 3.00 or less, with a low of 1.56 in 1994
  • 4 seasons with no fielding errors

Career pitching statistics for Maddux include:

  • 744 games played
  • 5,008.1 innings pitched
  • 3,371 strikeouts to 999 walks
  • 355-227 win-loss record
  • 3.16 ERA

Career fielding statistics for Maddux include:

  • 744 games played
  • 1,194 assists
  • 546 putouts
  • 53 errors
  • .970 fielding percentage

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Greg Maddux
ESPN - Greg Maddux