St. Louis Cardinals - Baseball Hall of Fame

Rogers Hornsby (1942)

Rogers Hornsby started playing baseball as a child and by the time he was a teenager, he was playing semi-pro baseball. In 1914, he started playing in the minor leagues and a year later he made his first appearance in the major leagues with the St. Louis Cardinals, playing in 18 games with them that season. In 1915, his first full season with the Cardinals, Hornsby batted .313 with 155 hits, 17 doubles, 15 triples, and 17 stolen bases in 139 games.

Early in his career, Hornsby played several infield positions but in 1920 he became the Cardinals regular second baseman. Five years later, Hornsby replaced Branch Rickey as manager and he served as player-manager for the Cardinals for the 1925 and 1926 seasons.

In December, 1926, Hornsby was traded by the Cardinals to the New York Giants. He was player-manager for part of the 1927 season, replacing an ailing John McGraw as manager. After that season, he was traded to the Boston Braves. After serving a year as player-manager with the Braves, Hornsby again found himself traded, this time to the Chicago Cubs. In 1930, his second season with the Cubs, Hornsby was injured and he played in just 42 games with them. Towards the end of the season, the Cubs made Hornsby their player-manager for the rest of the season. He continued in that role through most of the 1932 season.

In August, 1932, after playing in just 19 games with the Cubs, they released him. He signed with the Cardinals again in October, 1932, but they placed him on waivers in July, 1933, after playing 57 games with them. He was then claimed off waivers by the St. Louis Browns (the modern day Baltimore Orioles), who made Hornsby their player-manager. He continued with the Browns through 1937 but he played in only 56 games in his last four seasons.

Hornsby left major league baseball after the 1937 season to manage in the minor leagues. He also worked as a radio and TV broadcaster. In 1952, he made a comeback in the major leagues as a manager, first with the St. Louis Browns and then with the Cincinnati Reds. He continued as manager of the Reds in 1953 but he did not manage in the major leagues again after that season.

From 1958 through 1960, Hornsby was a coach for the Chicago Cubs. In 1962, his last season working in major league baseball, he was a scout and coach for the New York Mets. The following year, Hornsby died of a heart attack at the age of 66.

Hornsby won the National League MVP award in 1925 and 1929. He also won the league's Triple Crown award twice. He finished his career with the second highest batting average in major league history (Ty Cobb had the highest average). His record as a manager was 701 wins to 812 losses.

Hornsby played in over 100 games in each of 15 seasons (1915-1929, 1931). His statistics during that time include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 250 in 1922
  • 11 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 47 in 1929
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 20 in 1920
  • 7 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 42 in 1922
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 152 in 1922
  • 14 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .424 in 1924

Career statistics for Hornsby include:

  • 2,259 games played
  • 2,930 hits
  • 541 doubles
  • 169 triples
  • 301 home runs
  • 1,584 RBIs
  • .358 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Rogers Hornsby
ESPN Sports - Rogers Hornsby


Frankie Frisch (1947)

Frankie Frisch was a skilled athlete in college, playing on the baseball, football, basketball, and track teams. In 1919, he left college to join the New York Giants and he played in 54 games with them that season. The following season, Frisch played in 110 games and had a batting average of .280 with 123 hits, 10 doubles, 10 triples, 77 RBIs, and 34 stolen bases.

Frisch initially played second and third base but in 1923, the Giants made him their regular second baseman. After the 1926 season, the Giants traded him to the St. Louis Cardinals, where he continued to play through the 1937 season. In 1933, the Cardinals made Frisch player-manager and he continued to manage them through 1938. He became a part-time player in 1936, playing in 93 games that season and just 17 games the following season.

Frisch won the National League MVP award in 1931. Earlier in his career, he led the National League in hits (1923) and stolen bases (1921).

After ending his time as manager with the Cardinals, Frisch was out of major league baseball for just one season. In 1940, he returned as manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates, a position he held through the 1946 season. He took a short break again from the major leagues and returned in 1949 to manage the Chicago Cubs for three seasons. After that, Frisch became a radio announcer and coach for the New York Giants.

Frisch played in over 100 games in each of 16 seasons (1920-1935). His statistics during that time include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 223 in 1923
  • 8 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 46 in 1930
  • 7 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 17 in 1921
  • 3 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with a high of 114 in 1930
  • 11 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 49 in 1921
  • 13 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .348 in 1923

Career statistics for Frisch include:

  • 2,311 games played
  • 2,880 hits
  • 466 doubles
  • 138 triples
  • 1,244 RBIs
  • 419 stolen bases
  • .316 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Frankie Frisch
ESPN Sports - Frankie Frisch


Dizzy Dean (1953)

Dizzy Dean who pitched for the St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Browns (modern day Baltimore Orioles) had a brother, Paul "Daffy" Dean, who was also a Cardinals pitcher. Each brother won two games for the Cardinals in the 1934 World Series.

Dean started his major league career with the Cardinals in 1930, playing in just one game that season. He didn't play again with the Cardinals until 1932, when he had his first full season with 46 games.

Dean suffered an injury in the 1937 All Star Game that eventually led to a greater injury to his throwing arm. Following that season, he moved to the Chicago Cubs, playing with them through the 1941 season, although he only played in one game in that final season. Dean attempted a comeback in 1947 with the St. Louis Browns but he managed to pitch in just one game with them.

In 1934, Dean won the National League MVP award. He led the league in strikeouts four times (1932-1935).

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Dean started a second successful career as a radio and TV broadcaster. He started that career in 1941 and it lasted through 1968.

Statistics for Dean in 9 seasons (1931-1940) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 30 in 1934
  • 5 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 199 in 1933
  • 3 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.81 in 1938 in 13 games

Career statistics for Dean include:

  • 317 games played
  • 1,967.1 innings pitched
  • 150-83 win-loss record
  • 1,163 strikeouts to 453 walks
  • 3.02 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Dizzy Dean
ESPN Sports - Dizzy Dean


Joe Medwick (1968)

Joe Medwick started his major league career with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1932, playing in 26 games that season. The following year, his first full season in the major leagues, he showed his power potential by batting .306 with 182 hits, 40 doubles, 10 triples, 18 home runs, and 98 RBIs in 148 games.

Medwick's best season was 1937 when he won the National League MVP award and the National League Triple Crown. That season he batted .374 with 237 hits, 56 doubles, 10 triples, 31 home runs, and 154 RBIs in 156 games.

During the 1940 season, the Cardinals traded Medwick to the Brooklyn Dodgers. Three years later, after 48 games with the Dodgers in 1943, they traded him to the New York Giants. That team, too, traded Medwick - in 1945, he went from the Giants to the Boston Braves. He lasted just 66 games with the Braves before moving back to the Dodgers for 41 games in 1946. He spent his last two seasons, 1947 and 1948, with his first team, the Cardinals, playing in 75 games in 1947 and just 20 games in his final season.

After Medwick left major league baseball, he played in the minor leagues for four seasons (1949-1952).

Medwick played in over 100 games in each of 12 seasons (1933-1944). His statistics during that time include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 237 in 1937
  • 11 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 64 in 1936
  • 8 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 18 in 1934
  • 3 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 31 in 1937
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 154 in 1937
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .374 in 1937

Career statistics for Medwick include:

  • 1,984 games played
  • 2,471 hits
  • 540 doubles
  • 113 triples
  • 205 home runs
  • 1,383 RBIs
  • .324 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe Medwick
ESPN Sports - Joe Medwick


Stan Musial (1969)

Stan Musial started playing semi-pro baseball as a pitcher when he was just fifteen. Two years later, in 1938, he signed with the St. Louis Cardinals, the team he played with for his entire major league career. He played with the Cardinals minor league teams until September, 1941, when he was called up to the majors for 12 games. The following season, his rookie one, Musial played in the outfield, batting .315 with 147 hits, 32 doubles, and 10 triples in 140 games.

Musial was drafted into the US navy in May, 1944, but he was able to finish the baseball season before serving. He spent 15 months in the navy, missing the entire 1945 baseball season. When he returned to the Cardinals in 1946, he became their regular first baseman. He also acquired the nickname "Stan the Man" that season. Musial played through the 1963 season and batted .255 with 86 hits in 124 games.

Musial won the National League MVP award three times (1943,1946, 1948) and he won the National League Batting Title seven times (1943, 1946, 1948, 1950-1952, 1957). He was voted an All Star twenty-four times.

Musial served as Vice President of the Cardinals from September, 1963 through the end of the 1966 season. In 1967, he served for a year as the team's general manager.

Fielding statistics for Musial as an outfielder include 64 errors, 130 assists, 3,730 putouts, and a .984 fielding percentage in 1,890 games played. His statistics as a first baseman were even better with 78 errors, 688 assists, 8,709 putouts, 935 double plays, and a .992 fielding percentage in 1,016 games.

Batting statistics for Musial in 22 seasons (1941-1944, 1946-1963) in the major leagues include:

  • 15 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 230 in 1948
  • 16 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 53 in 1953
  • 8 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 20 in 1943 and 1946
  • 10 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 39 in 1948
  • 10 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 131 in 1948
  • 17 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .376 in 1948

Career statistics for Musial include:

  • 3,026 games played
  • 3,630 hits
  • 725 doubles
  • 177 triples
  • 475 home runs
  • 1,599 RBIs
  • .331 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Stan Musial
ESPN Sports - Stan Musial


Jesse Haines (1970)

Jesse Haines started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1913. He spent seven years in the minors, making just one appearance in 1918 in the major leagues with the Cincinnati Reds. Haines had a 1.93 ERA in the minors with a 107-61 win-loss record in 187 games.

In 1920, Haines joined the St. Louis Cardinals as a starting pitcher. In that season, he had a 2.98 ERA, 13-20 record, and 120 strikeouts to 80 walks in 301.2 innings pitched in 47 games. He continued playing with the Cardinals through the 1937 season, ending his career at the age of 43. On July 17, 1924, Haines pitched a no-hitter against the Boston Braves.

Statistics for Haines in 18 seasons (1920-1937) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 24 in 1927
  • 3 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.50 in 1933

Career statistics for Haines include:

  • 555 games played
  • 3,208.2 innings pitched
  • 210-158 win-loss record
  • 981 strikeouts to 871 walks
  • 3.64 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jesse Haines
ESPN Sports - Jesse Haines


Chick Hafey (1971)

Chick Hafey started in the major leagues in 1924, playing in 24 games with the St. Louis Cardinals. He continued to play part time for the team, playing in 93 games in 1925 and in 78 games in 1926. While with the Cardinals, Hafey's best season was 1929 when he batted .338 with 47 doubles, 29 home runs, and 125 RBIs. Two seasons later, he won the National League Batting Title.

In 1932, Hafey had a salary dispute with general manager Branch Rickey and he left the Cardinals to play with the Cincinnati Reds. He stayed with the Reds through the 1935 season but health issues affected his performance and he only played full seasons in 1933 and 1934. He retired in 1935 after just 15 games but he returned two years later to finish his playing career with 89 more games with the Reds.

Hafey played in over 100 games in each of 7 seasons (1927-1931, 1933-1934). His statistics during that time include:

  • 6 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 175 in 1928 and 1929
  • 5 seasons with over 30 doubles, with highs of 46 in 1928 and 47 in 1929
  • 3 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 29 in 1929
  • 3 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 125 in 1929
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .349 in 1931

Career statistics for Hafey include:

  • 1,283 games played
  • 1,466 hits
  • 341 doubles
  • 164 home runs
  • 833 RBIs
  • .317 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Chick Hafey
ESPN Sports - Chick Hafey


Jim Bottomley (1974)

Jim Bottomley played semi-pro baseball before signing with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1919. He spent 1920 through 1922 in the minor leagues before being called up to the Cardinals in August, 1922. He played in 37 games with the Cardinals that year. The following season, his rookie year, Bottomley batted .371 with 194 hits, 34 doubles, 14 triples and 94 RBIs in 134 games.

In 1928, Bottomley won the National League MVP award. That season he batted .325 with 187 hits, 42 doubles, 20 triples, 31 home runs, and 136 RBIs in 149 games.

Bottomley stayed with the Cardinals through the 1932 season. They traded him after that season to the Cincinnati Reds. He spent three seasons with the Reds before he was traded to the St. Louis Browns prior to the 1936 season. In 1937, his last season in the major leagues, Bottomley was made the player-manager of the Browns, playing in 65 games with them that season.

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Bottomley worked as a scout for the Chicago Cubs and as a minor league manager.

Bottomley played in over 100 games in each of 13 seasons (1923-1931, 1933-1936). His statistics during that time include:

  • 9 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 227 in 1925
  • 11 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 44 in 1925
  • 9 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 20 in 1928
  • 3 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 31 in 1928
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with highs of 136 in 1928 and 137 in 1929
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .371 in 1923

Career statistics for Bottomley include:

  • 1,991 games played
  • 2,313 hits
  • 465 doubles
  • 151 triples
  • 219 home runs
  • 1,422 RBIs
  • .310 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jim Bottomley
ESPN Sports - Jim Bottomley


Bob Gibson (1981)

Bob Gibson was an all-around athlete when he was young and he played both baseball and basketball. He signed with the Cardinals in the mid-1950s but played basketball with the Harlem Globetrotters in 1957, prior to joining the Cardinals. The following year, he played in the Cardinals minor league organization.

Gibson started as a relief pitcher for the Cardinals in 1959 but he was sent back to the minor leagues for a short time. When he returned to the Cardinals, he was moved into their starting rotation. He pitched in 13 games with the Cardinals in 1959. The following season, he again spent part of the season in the minor leagues. He pitched in 27 games that season and ended with a 5.61 ERA and 3-6 record.

In the first half of the 1961 season, Gibson moved between the starting rotation and the bullpen but in July, the team's new manager, Johnny Keane, made Gibson a permanent starter. He pitched in 35 games that year, with an ERA of 3.24, a 13-12 record, and 166 strikeouts to 119 walks.

Gibson was as good a fielder as he was a pitcher and he won nine consecutive Gold Glove awards in his career (1965-1973). He also won two Cy Young awards (1968, 1970), the National League MVP award (1968), and two World Series MVP awards (1964, 1967). He pitched his only career no-hitter on August 14, 1971.

Gibson retired as a player after the 1975 season. From 1981 through 1984, he worked as a coach for the New York Mets and the Atlanta Braves. He followed that with five years as a radio broadcaster (1985-1989).

Statistics for Gibson in 17 seasons (1959-1975) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 23 in 1970
  • 9 seasons with over 200 strikeouts, with a high of 274 in 1970
  • 7 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.12 in 1968

Post-season statistics for Gibson include:

  • 9 games played
  • 81.0 innings pitched
  • 7-2 win-loss record
  • 92 strikeouts to 17 walks
  • 1.89 ERA

Career statistics for Gibson include:

  • 528 games played
  • 3,884.1 innings pitched
  • 251-174 win-loss record
  • 3,117 strikeouts to 1,336 walks
  • 2.91 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bob Gibson
ESPN Sports - Bob Gibson


Johnny Mize (1981)

Johnny Mize started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues with the St. Louis Cardinals. In 1934 they traded him to the Cincinnati Reds but after he was injured, the deal was nullified and Mize returned to the Cardinals' minor league organization.

In 1936, Mize was called up to the Cardinals. That season he batted .329 with 136 hits, 30 doubles, 19 home runs, and 93 RBIs in 126 games. Mize stayed with the Cardinals through the 1941 season.

The Cardinals traded Mize to the New York Giants after the 1941 season and he played with the Giants one season before joining the US military. Mize spent the war years, 1943-1945, in the military, rejoining the Giants in 1946. In 1949, the Giants traded him to the New York Yankees, where he finished out his career in 1953.

Statistics for Mize in 14 seasons (1936-1941, 1946-1953) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 204 in 1937
  • 6 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 44 in 1939
  • 3 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 16 in 1938
  • 9 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 51 in 1947
  • 8 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with highs of 137 in 1940 and 138 in 1947
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .364 in 1937

Career statistics for Mize include:

  • 1,884 games played
  • 2,011 hits
  • 367 doubles
  • 83 triples
  • 359 home runs
  • 1,337 RBIs
  • .312 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Johnny Mize
ESPN Sports - Johnny Mize


Enos Slaughter (1985)

Enos Slaughter started his professional baseball career in 1935 in the minor leagues. After three years in the minors, Slaughter joined the St. Louis Cardinals in 1938, playing in 112 games with them. In his first season in the major leagues, Slaughter batted .276 with 109 hits and 20 doubles. The following year, he led the National League in doubles. In 1939, Slaughter had 52 doubles, 193 hits, 86 RBIs, and a .320 batting average in 149 games.

In 1942, Slaughter led the National League in hits and triples. That season he had 188 hits, 31 doubles, 17 triples, 98 RBIs, and a .318 batting average in 152 games. Slaughter spent the following three years in the US military.

Slaughter returned to the Cubs in 1946. In his first year back, he led the National League in RBIs with 130. That season he batted .300 with 183 hits, 30 doubles, and 18 triples in 156 games. The next season he led the National League in triples for the second time in his career.

In 1954, Slaughter left the Cubs and joined the New York Yankees. He played in just 69 games that season and after 10 games in 1955, the Yankees traded him to the Kansas City Athletics. Slaughter had almost two full seasons with the Athletics (108 games in 1955 and 91 games in 1956) and then returned to the Yankees for 24 games in 1956. He continued with the Yankees through most of the 1959 season. After 74 games in 1959, he was traded to the Milwaukee Braves and he finished his last 11 major league games with them.

Slaughter played in over 100 games in each of 15 seasons (1938-1942, 1946-1953, 1955-1956). His statistics during those seasons include:

  • 9 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 193 in 1939
  • 11 seasons with 20 or more doubles, with a high of 52 in 1939
  • 7 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 17 in 1942
  • 3 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 130 in 1946
  • 10 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .336 in 1949

Career statistics for Slaughter include:

  • 2,380 games played
  • 2,383 hits
  • 413 doubles
  • 148 triples
  • 1,304 RBIs
  • .300 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Enos Slaughter
ESPN Sports - Enos Slaughter
Baseball Reference.com - Enos Slaughter


Lou Brock (1985)

After playing baseball in college, Lou Brock signed with the Chicago Cubs in 1960. He spent most of the 1961 season in the minor leagues, playing in only four games with the Cubs that season. The following year, his first full season in the major leagues, Brock batted .263 with 114 hits, 24 doubles, and 16 stolen bases in 123 games.

The Cubs traded Brock to the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1964 season. He played in 52 games with the Cubs and 103 games with the Cardinals that year. The following season, he started showing his speed with 63 stolen bases in 155 games. A year later, in 1966, Brock led the National League in stolen bases with 74. He would lead the league in stolen bases seven more times in his career (1967-1969, 1971-1974). Brock had a career high of 118 stolen bases in 1974.

Brock led the National League in doubles with 46 and in triples with 14 in 1968. In 1979, his last season in the major leagues, Brock was named the National League Comeback Player of the Year. That season he batted .304 with 123 hits and 21 stolen bases in 120 games.

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Brock worked as a special instructor and coach for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Statistics for Brock in 19 seasons (1961-1979) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with 100 or more hits, with a high of 206 in 1967
  • 6 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 46 in 1968
  • 6 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 14 in 1968
  • 12 seasons with over 50 stolen bases, with a high of 118 in 1974
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .315 in 1964

Career statistics for Brock include:

  • 2,616 games played
  • 486 doubles
  • 141 triples
  • 938 stolen bases
  • .293 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Lou Brock
ESPN Sports - Lou Brock
Baseball Reference.com - Lou Brock


Red Schoendienst (1989)

Red Schoendienst was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1942. After spending three seasons in the minor leagues, he joined the Cardinals in 1945 as a left fielder. In his first season in the major leagues, Schoendienst batted .278 with 157 hits, 22 doubles, and 26 stolen bases in 137 games. The following season he was moved to second base, the position he held for most of his career.

Schoendienst's best season with the Cardinals was perhaps 1953 when he batted .342. That season he had 193 hits, 35 doubles, 15 home runs, and 79 RBIs in 146 games.

In 1956, Schoendienst played with the Cardinals in 40 games before being traded to the New York Giants. The following year, after 57 games with the Giants, he was again traded, this time to the Milwaukee Braves. He stayed with the Braves for four more years, but he played in only five games with them in 1959 after being treated for tuberculosis. He played in under 75 games in each of the next two seasons with the Braves. In 1961, Schoendienst returned to the Cardinals to finish out his career, playing in just 6 games in 1963, his final year in the majors.

Schoendienst was an excellent fielding second baseman. His career statistics at second base include:

  • 1,834 games played
  • 170 errors
  • 5,243 assists
  • 1,368 double plays
  • 4,616 putouts
  • .983 fielding percentage

Two years after retiring as a player, Schoendienst became a long-time manager for the St. Louis Cardinals. He managed them from 1965 through 1976, returned for the 1980 season, and then again for the 1990 season. His record as a manager was 1,041 wins to 955 losses. In between managing stints, Schoendienst worked as a coach for the Oakland Athletics and the Cardinals and as a special assistant to the Cardinals' general manager.

Schoendienst played in over 100 games in each of 14 seasons (1945-1958). His statistics during those seasons include:

  • 9 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 200 in 1957
  • 6 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 43 in 1950
  • 7 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .342 in 1953

Career batting statistics for Schoendienst include:

  • 2,216 games played
  • 2,449 hits
  • 427 doubles
  • .289 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Red Schoendienst
ESPN Sports - Red Schoendienst
Baseball Reference.com - Red Schoendienst


Ozzie Smith (2002)

Ozzie Smith was a shortstop in major league baseball for the San Diego Padres for 4 years (1978-1981) and for the St. Louis Cardinals for 15 years (1982-1996). Prior to being drafted by the Padres in 1977, Smith had played baseball in high school and college and on a semi-pro team. After a year in the minors, he was called up to the Padres in 1978. In his first season in the major leagues, Smith batted .258 with 152 hits, 17 doubles, and 40 stolen bases.

An excellent fielding shortstop, Smith won his first of 13 consecutive Gold Gloves in 1980. That season he had a career high 621 assists, a major league record for shortstops. He also had a career high 113 defensive double plays, 288 putouts, 24 errors, and a .974 fielding percentage in 158 games. Smith holds the major league record for most career assists by a shortstop and most career defensive double plays by a shortstop.

The Padres traded Smith to the Cardinals after the 1981 season. In 1985, Smith helped the Cardinals win the National League pennant by hitting a game winning home run in the last game of the championship series. That post-season, he had 12 hits in 13 games and he won the National League Championship series MVP award. Two years later, Smith had his only batting average over .300 and he won a Silver Slugger award.

Smith suffered injuries in his final three seasons that limited his playing time. He played in just 44 games in 1995 and in 82 games in 1996, his final season in the major leagues.

After retiring as a major league player, Smith hosted "This Week in Baseball" on TV for three years (1997-1999). During this time period, he also served as a commentator for Cardinals' games. In 1999, he signed with CNN-SI as a broadcaster.

Batting statistics for Smith in 16 seasons (1978-1993) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 182 in 1987
  • 11 seasons with 20 or more doubles, with a high of 40 in 1987
  • 11 seasons with over 30 stolen bases, with a high of 57 in 1980 and 1988

Career fielding statistics for Smith at shortstop include:

  • 2,511 games played
  • 281 errors
  • 8,375 assists
  • 1,590 double plays
  • 4,249 putouts
  • .978 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Smith include:

  • 2,573 games played
  • 2,460 hits
  • 402 doubles
  • 580 stolen bases
  • .262 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ozzie Smith
ESPN Sports - Ozzie Smith
Baseball Reference.com - Ozzie Smith