Chicago Cubs - Baseball Hall of Fame

Michael "King" Kelly (1945)

Michael "King" Kelly started playing amateur baseball at the age of 15. From 1875 through 1877, he played semi-pro baseball. When he joined the Cincinnati Reds in 1878, he was an outfielder and backup catcher, playing in 60 games with the Reds that season. The following season he played in just 77 games with the Reds.

In 1880, Kelly joined the Chicago White Stockings of the National League (modern day Cubs). For his first four seasons with them (1880-1883), he played in less than 100 games each season. In 1884 and 1886, Kelly led the National League in batting. During his career, he led the National League in doubles three times.

The White Stockings sold Kelly's contract to the Boston Beaneaters/Braves after the 1886 season. The following season, Kelly was player-manager for the Beaneaters. In 1890, he left the Beaneaters to be player-manager of the Boston Reds of the newly formed Players' League. After the league folded in 1891, Kelly became player-manager of the Cincinnati Kelly's Killers of the American Association. He played in 82 games with the team and then moved back to the Boston Reds for four games.

Kelly returned to the Beaneaters in 1891, playing in 16 games with them that season and in 78 games in 1892. The following year his contract was transferred to the New York Giants and Kelly played in 20 games with them before leaving major league baseball. He played in the minor leagues in 1894 but died of pneumonia in November of that year at the age of 36.

Kelly played in over 100 games in each of 7 seasons (1884-1889, 1891). His statistics during that time include:

  • 3 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 175 in 1886
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 41 in 1889
  • 5 seasons with over 50 stolen bases, with a high of 84 in 1887
  • 4 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .388 in 1886

Career statistics for Kelly include:

  • 1,455 games played
  • 1,813 hits
  • 359 doubles
  • 102 triples
  • 368 stolen bases
  • .308 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Michael "King" Kelly
ESPN Sports - Michael "King" Kelly


Frank Chance (1946)

Prior to being signed by the Chicago Cubs, Frank Chance played college baseball and semi-pro baseball. In 1898, he joined the Cubs, playing in 53 games with them that season. Chance suffered from injuries that limited his playing time and he didn't play in over 100 games in any one season until 1903. In his first full season in the major leagues, Chance batted .327 with 144 hits, 24 doubles, 10 triples, 81 RBIs, and 67 stolen bases in 125 games. A very fast base runner, Chance led the National League in stolen bases in 1903 and 1906.

In 1905, Chance was made player-manager of the Cubs, a position he held through 1912. During his long baseball career with the Chicago Cubs, as both a player and manager, Chance led the Cubs to the National League pennant four times (1906-1908, 1910) and to two World Series (1907, 1908). His record as a manager of the Cubs was 768 wins to 389 losses.

Chance and his teammates Joe Tinker and Johnny Evers formed a very effective defensive infield that became known by the expression "Tinker to Evers to Chance," with Tinker at shortstop, Evers at second base, and Chance at first base. Career fielding statistics for Chance at first base include:

  • 997 games played
  • 135 errors
  • 615 assists
  • 470 double plays
  • 9,885 putouts
  • .983 fielding percentage

After 14 years with the Cubs, Chance moved to the New York Yankees in 1913, playing and managing the New York team for two years. His record as a manager with the Yankees was 117 wins to 168 losses. In his last four seasons as a major league player, Chance played in a total of only 46 games.

After 16 years in the major leagues (1898-1914) and one year away from baseball during WW I (1915), Chance moved to the minor leagues. He managed in the Pacific Coast League for two seasons and then retired. In 1923, the Boston Red Sox brought Chance back to major league baseball as their manager. However, after the 1923 season and a 61-91 record managing the Red Sox, Chance retired permanently.

Statistics for Chance in 6 seasons (1903-1908) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 12 in 1905
  • 6 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 67 in 1903
  • 4 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .327 in 1903

Career batting statistics for Chance include:

  • 1,287 games played
  • 1,273 hits
  • 200 doubles
  • 401 stolen bases
  • .296 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Frank Chance
ESPN Sports - Frank Chance
Baseball Reference.com - Frank Chance


Johnny Evers (1946)

Johnny Evers started his professional baseball career as a shortstop in the minor leagues in 1902. The Chicago Cubs bought his contract and he played his first games in the major leagues in September, 1902. For the following season, his first full one in the major leagues, Evers played second base and he became part of the famous infield of "Tinker to Evers to Chance," playing second base to Joe Tinker's shortstop and Frank Chance's first base. In 1903, Evers batted .293 with 136 hits, 27 doubles, and 25 stolen bases in 124 games.

Evers had a nervous breakdown in 1911 and he played in just 46 games that season. He recovered fully by the 1912 season and batted .341 with 163 hits, 23 doubles, and 11 triples in 143 games that year. In 1913 Evers was made player-manager of the Cubs and he was given a five-year contract. That turned out to be his last season with the Cubs. In February, 1914, he was traded to the Boston Braves.

Evers suffered injuries in 1915 and he played in under 100 games in each of his last three regular seasons in the major leagues. In 1917, the Braves placed Evers on waivers and he was claimed by the Philadelphia Phillies, playing that season in 24 games with the Braves and 56 games with the Phillies. He was signed by the Boston Red Sox as a player-coach for the 1918 season but he was released by the team before playing any games with them. Evers played two more games in the major leagues, one in 1922 with the Chicago White Sox and a final game in 1929 with the Boston Braves.

In 1920, Evers worked as a coach for the New York Giants. The next year, he was named manager of the Cubs but he was fired in August. He was a coach for the Chicago White Sox from 1922 through 1923 and then in 1924, he was named their manager for one year. Evers returned to the Boston Braves in 1929 as a coach and he stayed in that position through the 1932 season. He ended his baseball career as a general manager of a minor league team in 1935. Evers' record as a manager in the major leagues was 180 wins to 192 losses.

Fielding statistics for Evers as a second baseman include:

  • 1,735 games played
  • 423 errors
  • 689 double plays
  • 5,124 assists
  • 3,758 putouts
  • .955 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Evers include:

  • 1,784 games played
  • 1,659 hits
  • 216 doubles
  • 324 stolen bases
  • .270 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Johnny Evers
ESPN Sports - Johnny Evers
Baseball Reference.com - Johnny Evers


Joe Tinker (1946)

Joe Tinker started playing baseball at the age of 14 and he was on a semi-pro baseball team by the time he was in his late teens. At age 19, he was in the minor leagues, playing there from 1900-1901. The Chicago Cubs bought his contract in 1902. In his first season in the major leagues, Tinker batted .261 with 129 hits, 19 doubles, and 27 stolen bases in 131 games. He played with his infield partners Johnny Evers and Frank Chance for the first time in September, 1902.

In December, 1912, the Cubs traded Tinker to the Cincinnati Reds. He was made player-manager of the Reds but he stayed with them just one season. After the 1913 season ended, Tinker joined the Chicago Whales of the Federal League. He spent two seasons as player-manager of the team, but he only played in 31 games in 1915 due to a muscle injury. In 1916, the Cubs bought the Whales and the teams merged. Tinker was player-manager in his final season, playing in just seven games that season.

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Tinker owned and managed minor league teams from 1916 through the early 1920s. He spent the 1920s in real estate but returned to baseball in the 1930s as a coach and manager in the minor leagues. His last position was in 1946 as a scout for the Boston Braves.

Fielding statistics for Tinker as a shortstop include:

  • 1,745 games played
  • 635 errors
  • 671 double plays
  • 5,856 assists
  • 3,768 putouts
  • .938 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Tinker include:

  • 1,804 games played
  • 1,687 hits
  • 114 triples
  • 336 stolen bases
  • .262 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe Tinker
ESPN Sports - Joe Tinker
Baseball Reference.com - Joe Tinker


Mordecai Brown (1949)

Mordecai Brown started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1901. Two years later, he played in the major leagues with the St. Louis Cardinals. However, he only played with them in 26 games. The following year, Brown was with the Chicago Cubs.

Brown pitched for the Cubs from 1904 through 1912. His best season might have been 1906 when he pitched in 36 games and had a 26-6 record with 144 strikeouts to 61 walks and an ERA of 1.04. Two years later, he led the National League in saves, a feat he repeated in 1909, 1910, and 1911.

In 1913, Brown pitched in 39 games with the Cincinnati Reds. The next season, he moved to the Federal League and became player-manager of the St. Louis Terriers. He stayed in the Federal League for two more seasons but with different teams (Brooklyn Tip-Tops in 1914 and Chicago Whales in 1915). When the Cubs purchased the Whales in 1916, Brown returned to the Cubs for a final season of just 12 games. After leaving major league baseball as a player, Brown pitched, coached, and managed in the minor leagues.

Statistics for Brown in 14 seasons (1903-1916) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 29 in 1908
  • 12 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.04 in 1906

Career statistics for Brown include:

  • 481 games played
  • 3,172.1 innings pitched
  • 239-130 win-loss record
  • 1,375 strikeouts to 673 walks
  • 55 shutouts
  • 2.06 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Mordecai Brown
ESPN Sports - Mordecai Brown


Gabby Hartnett (1955)

Gabby Hartnett was a catcher for the Chicago Cubs for 19 years and their player-manager for three years. He finished out the last year of his major league career in 1941 with the New York Giants.

Hartnett started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1921 at the age of 20. A year later, he was the backup catcher for the Chicago Cubs, playing in 31 games with them. In July, 1924, Hartnett became the Cubs starting catcher. That season he batted .299 with 106 hits, 17 doubles, and 16 home runs in 111 games.

Hartnett's best season was perhaps 1930, when he batted .339 with 172 hits, 31 doubles, 37 home runs, and 122 RBIs in 141 games. Five years later, in 1935, Hartnett won the National League MVP award. That season he batted .344 with 142 hits, 32 doubles, 13 home runs, and 91 RBIs in 116 games.

From 1938-1940, Hartnett served as manager as well as catcher for the Cubs. His record as a manager was 203 wins to 176 losses in 383 games.

Hartnett was released by the Cubs in November, 1940, and a month later, he signed with the New York Giants. In 1941, his last season in the major leagues, Hartnett was the backup catcher for the Giants, playing in 64 games with them.

Hartnett was a very good defensive player. His career fielding statistics as a catcher include:

  • 1,793 games played
  • 139 errors
  • 1,254 assists
  • 7,292 putouts
  • .984 fielding percentage

After retiring as a player from the major leagues, Hartnett became a minor league manager (1941-1946). In the mid-1960s, he became a coach and scout for the Kansas City Athletics for two years.

Batting statistics for Hartnett in 20 seasons (1922-1941) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 32 in 1927, 1931, and 1935
  • 3 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 37 in 1930
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .354 in 1937

Career batting statistics for Hartnett include:

  • 1,990 games played
  • 1,912 hits
  • 396 doubles
  • 236 home runs
  • 1,179 RBIs
  • .297 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Gabby Hartnett
ESPN Sports - Gabby Hartnett
Baseball Reference.com - Gabby Hartnett


Kiki Cuyler (1968)

Kiki Cuyler started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1920. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates but he spent most of his first three seasons with them (1921-1923) in the minors, playing in a total of just 13 games with the Pirates over that time span. In 1924, he joined the Pirates for 117 games. That season, he batted .354 with 165 hits, 27 doubles, 16 triples, and 85 RBIs.

Cuyler led the National League in triples in 1925. The next season, he led the league in stolen bases for the first time. Cuyler would repeat that feat three more times in his career (1928-1930). He had his career high of 43 stolen bases in 1929.

Cuyler left the Pirates after the 1927 season and he joined the Chicago Cubs, a team he would play with for seven and a half years. His best season with the Cubs was 1930 when he batted .355 with 228 hits, 50 doubles, 17 triples, 134 RBIs, and 37 stolen bases in 156 games. In 1934, Cuyler led the National League in doubles with 42.

In 1935, after playing in 45 games with the Cubs, Cuyler was traded to the Cincinnati Reds. He played with the Reds through the 1937 season. Cuyler played in 82 games in 1938, his last season in the major leagues, with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

After retiring as a major league player, Cuyler became a manager in the minor leagues. In the 1940s, he returned to major league baseball as a coach for the Chicago Cubs and the Boston Red Sox.

From 1924-1937, Cuyler played in over 100 games in each of 12 seasons (1924-1926, 1928-1932, 1934-1937). His statistics for those 12 seasons include:

  • 8 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 228 in 1930
  • 5 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 50 in 1930
  • 6 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 26 in 1925
  • 3 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 134 in 1930
  • 6 seasons with over 30 stolen bases, with a high of 43 in 1929
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .360 in 1929

Career statistics for Cuyler include:

  • 1,879 games played
  • 2,299 hits
  • 394 doubles
  • 157 triples
  • .321 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Kiki Cuyler
ESPN Sports - Kiki Cuyler


Billy Herman (1975)

Billy Herman started his professional baseball career in 1928 in the minor leagues. After more than three years in the minors, he made his first start in the major leagues in 1931 with the Chicago Cubs, playing in 25 games with them. The next year, Herman's first full season in the major leagues, he batted .314 with 206 hits and 42 doubles in 154 games.

Herman's best seasons were probably 1935 and 1936. He had a career high of 57 doubles in each season and a batting average of .341 in 1935 and .334 in 1936.

In 1941, after 11 games and a batting average of .194, the Cubs traded Herman to the Brooklyn Dodgers. He played with the Dodgers from 1941-1943, but then left to serve in World War II. Herman returned to the Dodgers in 1946 and after 47 games, he was traded to the Boston Braves.

Herman spent 1947, his last season as a player in the major leagues, with the Pittsburgh Pirates, playing in just 15 games that season. He was also manager of the Pirates and the team ended the season with 61 wins to 92 losses.

After retiring as a major league player, Herman managed in the minor leagues for four years (1948-1951). In 1952, he returned to the major leagues as a coach for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He remained in that position for six years, and then switched to the Milwaukee Braves for two years. In 1960, Herman left his coaching position with the Braves to become a coach with the Boston Red Sox. After coaching the Red Sox for five years, Herman became their manager for the 1965 and 1966 seasons. He was not successful as a manager with Boston and his record with them was 128 wins to 182 losses.

In 1967, Herman returned to coaching, this time with the California Angels. After that season, he retired from major league baseball until 1978, when he returned to be a coach for the San Diego Padres for two years.

Statistics for Herman in 13 full seasons (1932-1943, 1946) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 227 in 1935
  • 11 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 57 in 1935 and 1936
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .341 in 1935

Career statistics for Herman include:

  • 1,922 games played
  • 2,345 hits
  • 486 doubles
  • 82 triples
  • .304 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Billy Herman
ESPN Sports - Billy Herman
Baseball Reference.com - Billy Herman


Ernie Banks (1977)

Ernie Banks started his professional baseball career in 1950 with the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues. He was drafted into the army in 1951 but returned to the Monarchs in 1953. That September he was signed by the Chicago Cubs and he played in 10 games with them that year. In 1954, his first full season in the major leagues, Banks batted .275 with 163 hits, 19 doubles, 19 home runs, and 79 RBIs in 154 games. The following season, Banks hit five grand slam home runs plus 39 regular home runs.

Banks won back-to-back National League MVP awards in 1958 and 1959. Both of those seasons he led the National League in home runs with 47 in 1958 and 45 in 1959 and in RBIs with 129 in 1958 and 143 in 1959. He batted .313 in 1958 and .304 in 1959.

In 1960, Banks won his only Gold Glove, winning it as a shortstop. Two years later, he was moved to first base and he ended up playing more games in his career at first base than at shortstop. Career fielding statistics for Banks at shortstop include:

  • 1,125 games played
  • 174 errors
  • 3,441 assists
  • 724 double plays
  • 2,087 putouts
  • .969 fielding percentage

Career fielding statistics for Banks at first base include:

  • 1,259 games played
  • 80 errors
  • 809 assists
  • 1,005 double plays
  • 12,005 putouts
  • .994 fielding percentage

Banks only played in 72 games in 1970, batting just .252 that season. In 1971, his last season in the major leagues, Banks played in only 39 games and batted .193.

After Banks retired as a major league player, he became a coach for the Cubs. He died on January 23, 2015, at the age of 83.

Batting statistics for Banks in 16 full seasons (1954-1969) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 193 in 1958
  • 13 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 47 in 1958
  • 8 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 143 in 1959

Career batting statistics for Banks include:

  • 2,528 games played
  • 2,583 hits
  • 407 doubles
  • 512 home runs
  • 1,636 RBIs
  • .274 batting average

Learn some more interesting facts about Ernie Banks from MLB.

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ernie Banks
ESPN Sports - Ernie Banks
Baseball Reference.com - Ernie Banks


Hack Wilson (1979)

Hack Wilson started his baseball career in the minor leagues in 1921 but, in 1923, at the age of 23, he moved up to the major leagues with the New York Giants. However, he played in only three games with the Giants that season. The following year, Wilson played in 107 games with the Giants, batting .295 with 113 hits, 19 doubles, and 12 triples.

After playing in only 62 games with the Giants in 1925, Wilson moved to the Chicago Cubs in 1926 and he had a stellar year with the Cubs. That season, he led the National League in home runs with 21. He also had 170 hits, 36 doubles, 109 RBIs, and a batting average of .321.

In 1930, Wilson had his best season, batting .356 with 208 hits, 35 doubles, 56 home runs, and 190 RBIs in 155 games. That year he led the National League in both home runs and RBIs. Wilson also led the league in home runs in 1926, 1927, and 1928, and in RBIs in 1929.

Wilson left the Cubs after the 1931 season and played for two and a half seasons with the Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1934, his last season in the major leagues, Wilson played in 67 games with the Dodgers and he ended his career with a final seven games with the Philadelphia Phillies.

Wilson played in over 100 games in each of 9 seasons (1924, 1926-1933). His statistics for those nine seasons include:

  • 5 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 208 in 1930
  • 6 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 37 in 1932
  • 6 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 56 in 1930
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 190 in 1930
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .356 in 1930

Career statistics for Wilson include:

  • 1,348 games played
  • 1,461 hits
  • 266 doubles
  • 244 home runs
  • 1,062 RBIs
  • .307 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Hack Wilson
ESPN Sports - Hack Wilson


Billy Williams (1987)

Billy Williams started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1956. After more than three years in the minors, he had his first start in the major leagues with the Chicago Cubs in 1959, playing in 18 games. He spent most of the following season back in the minor leagues, playing in only 12 games with the Cubs in 1960.

In 1961, his first full season in the major leagues, Williams won the National League Rookie of the Year award. That season he batted .278 with 147 hits, 20 doubles, 25 home runs, and 86 RBIs in 146 games.

Williams won the National League batting title in 1972 with a batting average of .333. His other statistics that season included 191 hits, 34 doubles, 37 home runs, and 122 RBIs in 150 games.

Although Williams played well in 1974, the Cubs traded him after the season to the Oakland Athletics. His batting average was only .244 in 1975 but he still showed some power with 127 hits, 20 doubles, and 23 home runs. In 1976, his last season in the major leagues, Williams batted just .211 with 74 hits in 120 games.

After retiring as a major league player, Williams served as a coach for the Chicago Cubs.

Statistics for Williams in 16 full seasons (1961-1976) in the major leagues include:

  • 12 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 203 in 1965
  • 7 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 39 in 1964 and 1965
  • 14 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 42 in 1970
  • 3 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 129 in 1970
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .333 in 1972

Career statistics for Williams include:

  • 2,488 games played
  • 2,711 hits
  • 438 doubles
  • 426 home runs
  • 1,475 RBIs
  • .290 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Billy Williams
Baseball Reference - Billy Williams


Ferguson Jenkins (1991)

Ferguson Jenkins signed with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1962. He spent three years in the minor leagues before pitching in relief for the Phillies in 10 games in 1965. The following season, after pitching in just one game, the Phillies traded him to the Chicago Cubs. For the rest of that season, he played primarily as a relief pitcher with the Cubs, pitching in 60 games.

In 1967, Jenkins joined the Cubs starting rotation, pitching in 38 games with them. That season he had a 20-13 record with 236 strikeouts to 83 walks and a 2.80 ERA in 38 games. Two years later, Jenkins led the National League in strikeouts with 273.

Jenkins won the National League Cy Young award in 1971. He also led the league in wins. That season he had a 24-13 record with 263 strikeouts to 37 walks and an ERA of 2.77 in 39 games.

The Cubs traded Jenkins to the Texas Rangers after the 1973 season. That trade proved beneficial for both the Rangers and Jenkins. In 41 games with the Rangers in 1974, Jenkins had a career high 25 wins, 225 strikeouts, and a 2.82 ERA. He won the American League Comeback Player of the Year award and he led the American League in wins that season.

Jenkins left the Rangers in 1976 and moved to the Boston Red Sox for two years, only to return to the Rangers in 1978 for four seasons. He went back to the Cubs in 1982 and, after a final full season in 1983, he retired as a player.

Statistics for Jenkins in 18 full seasons (1966-1983) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 25 in 1974
  • 12 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with highs of 273 in 1969 and 274 in 1970
  • 4 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.63 in 1968

Career statistics for Jenkins include:

  • 664 games played
  • 4,500.2 innings pitched
  • 284-226 win-loss record
  • 3,192 strikeouts to 997 walks
  • 3.34 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ferguson Jenkins
ESPN Sports - Ferguson Jenkins


Ryne Sandberg (2005)


Date of Birth: 9/18/1959
Birthplace: Spokane, Washington

Ryne Sandberg was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1978. After spending close to four years in the minor leagues, he played in 13 games with the Phillies in 1981. He batted just .167 that season and the Phillies traded him to the Chicago Cubs prior to the 1982 season. In his first full season in the major leagues, Sandberg batted .271 with 172 hits, 33 doubles, and 32 stolen bases in 156 games. The following year, 1983, he won his first of nine consecutive Gold Glove awards. His fielding statistics for that season included 13 errors, 571 assists, 126 defensive double plays, 330 putouts, and a .986 fielding percentage in 157 games.

In 1984, Sandberg won his second Gold Glove, his first of seven Silver Slugger awards, and the National League MVP award. That season he led the league in triples. In addition to 19 triples, Sandberg had his career highs in hits with 200, doubles with 36, and batting average with .314. Six years later, in 1990, Sandberg led the National League in home runs with 40.

In 1994, after playing in only 57 games, Sandberg retired but he returned to the Cubs in 1996 for two final full seasons.

Sandberg won 9 Gold Glove awards (1983-1991) and 7 Silver Slugger awards (1984-1985, 1988-1992). He was rewarded financially for his accomplishments in 1992 when he became the highest paid player in major league baseball.

After his retirement as a major league player, Sandberg spent time as a Spring training instructor for the Cubs, a radio baseball analyst for ESPN (2004), and as a minor league manager, first for the Cubs organization (2007-2010) and more recently for the Phillies (2011-2012). He started the 2013 season as a coach and instructor with the Phillies. On August 16, 2013, Sandberg was named interim manager of the Phillies. A little over a month later, on September 22, 2013, he was made the permanent manager.

In 2013, his first season as manager, Sandberg led the Phillies to a 20-22 win-loss record in 42 games. The team did not fare well under his leadership in 2014, finishing in last place in the National League East division with a 73-89 record.

After a very poor start to the 2015 season (26 wins to 48 losses), Sandberg resigned as the Phillies' manager on June 26th. In his two and a half years managing the team, he had a 119 to 159 record.

Batting statistics for Sandberg in 14 full seasons (1982-1993, 1996-1997) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 200 in 1984
  • 6 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 36 in 1984
  • 6 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 40 in 1990
  • 9 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 54 in 1985
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .314 in 1984

Career fielding statistics for Sandberg at second base include:

  • 1,995 games played
  • 109 errors
  • 6,363 assists
  • 1,158 double plays
  • 3,807 putouts
  • .989 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Sandberg include:

  • 2,164 games played
  • 2,386 hits
  • 403 doubles
  • 282 home runs
  • 1,061 RBIs
  • 344 stolen bases
  • .285 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ryne Sandberg
ESPN Sports - Ryne Sandberg
Baseball Reference.com - Ryne Sandberg


Bruce Sutter (2006)

Bruce Sutter was originally drafted in 1970 by the Washington Senators but he opted instead to go to college. A year later, in September, 1971, he signed with the Chicago Cubs. He spent four seasons in the minor leagues before being called up in May, 1976. That season he pitched in 52 games for the Cubs, primarily as a reliever, and he had a 6-3 record with 10 saves, 73 strikeouts to 26 walks, and an ERA of 2.70.

In 1979, Sutter won the National League Cy Young award. That season he pitched in 62 games with 37 saves, 110 strikeouts to 32 walks, and a 2.22 ERA. He led the National League in saves and repeated that feat the following season.

In December, 1980, Sutter was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals. He played four years with the Cardinals and in that time led the National League in saves three times (1981, 1982, 1984). Sutter became a free agent after the 1984 season and in December, he signed with the Atlanta Braves. He played with them in 1985, 1986, and 1988. In 1986, he played in just 16 games and he didn't play at all in 1987.

Statistics for Sutter in 12 seasons (1976-1986, 1988) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with over 20 saves, with a high of 45 in 1984
  • 7 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.34 in 1977

Career statistics for Sutter include:

  • 661 games played
  • 1,042.1 innings pitched
  • 300 saves
  • 861 strikeouts to 309 walks
  • 2.83 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bruce Sutter
ESPN Sports - Bruce Sutter


Ron Santo (2012)

Ron Santo signed with the Chicago Cubs in 1959 and a year later, he was playing in the major leagues. He played in 96 games in 1960. In 1961, his first full season with the Cubs, Santo batted .284 with 164 hits, 32 doubles, 23 home runs, and 83 RBIs in 154 games.

Santo played with the Cubs through the 1973 season. During that time, he led the National League in walks four times and triples once. Known as an outstanding third base fielder, Santo won five Gold Gloves (1964-1968) and led the National League in double plays six times (1961, 1964, 1966-1968, 1971) and assists seven times (1962-1968).

In December, 1973, the Cubs traded Santo to the Chicago White Sox. In his one season with the White Sox, Santo was their designated hitter for most of the 117 games in which he played. He retired after the 1974 season at the age of 34.

Fielding statistics for Santo at third base include:

  • 2,130 games played
  • 317 errors
  • 4,581 assists
  • 395 double plays
  • 1,955 putouts
  • .954 fielding percentage

Batting statistics for Santo in 15 seasons (1960-1974) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 187 in 1963
  • 4 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 33 in 1964
  • 10 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 33 in 1965
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 123 in 1969
  • 4 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with highs of .312 in 1966 and .313 in 1964

Career statistics for Santo include:

  • 2,243 games played
  • 2,254 hits
  • 365 doubles
  • 342 home runs
  • 1,331 RBIs
  • .277 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ron Santo
ESPN Sports - Ron Santo
Baseball Reference.com - Ron Santo