LA Dodgers - Baseball Hall of Fame

Dazzy Vance (1955)

Dazzy Vance played in the minor leagues before joining the Pittsburgh Pirates for one game and the New York Yankees for eight games in 1915. He then went back to the minors and didn't have another major league appearance until 1918, when he played in just two games with the Yankees. He returned again to the minor leagues and stayed there until the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers bought his contract in 1922. He was already 31 years old.

In 1922, Vance pitched in 36 games with the Dodgers. He had an 18-12 record with 134 strikeouts to 94 walks and a 3.70 ERA. Vance pitched for the Dodgers for the next ten seasons. His best season was probably 1924 when he won the National League MVP award and the National League Triple Crown for pitchers. That season he had a 28-6 record with 262 strikeouts to 77 walks and a 2.16 ERA in 35 games.

While pitching for the Dodgers, Vance led the National League in ERA three times (1924, 1928, 1930), wins twice (1924, 1925), and strikeouts seven times (1922-1928). On September 13, 1925, he had the only no hitter of his career.

Vance moved to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1933, playing in 28 games for them with a 6-2 record, 67 strikeouts to 28 walks, and a 3.55 ERA. The following season he was traded to the Cincinnati Reds. After six games with the Reds in 1934, Vance was traded back to the Cardinals. He played in 19 games with the Cardinals in 1934 and then returned to the Dodgers in 1935, his last season in the major leagues. He pitched in 20 games in his final season.

Statistics for Vance in 14 seasons (1922-1935) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 28 in 1924
  • 7 seasons with 150 or more strikeouts, with a high of 262 in 1924
  • 4 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.09 in 1928

Career statistics for Vance include:

  • 442 games played
  • 2,966.2 innings pitched
  • 197-140 win-loss record
  • 2,045 strikeouts to 840 walks
  • 3.24 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Dazzy Vance
ESPN Sports - Dazzy Vance


Zack Wheat (1959)

Zack Wheat, who played for the Brooklyn Superbas/Dodgers from 1909 through 1926, had a brother who also played with the Dodgers while Zack was with them. Wheat played in the minor leagues for close to four seasons before joining the Dodgers in September, 1909. That season he played in just 26 games with the Dodgers.

In 1910, his first full season in the major leagues, Wheat batted .284 with 172 hits, 36 doubles, 15 triples, and 16 stolen bases in 156 games. He won the National League batting title in 1918, with a .335 batting average in 105 games.

After the 1926 season ended, the Dodgers released Wheat and he signed with the Philadelphia Athletics. After 88 games with the Athletics in 1927, the team released Wheat. The following season he played in the minor leagues.

Statistics for Wheat in 18 full seasons (1910-1927) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 221 in 1925
  • 6 seasons with over 30 doubles, with highs of 41 in 1924 and 42 in 1925
  • 11 seasons with 10 or more triples, with highs of 14 in 1925 and 15 in 1910
  • 13 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .375 in 1923 and 1924

Career statistics for Wheat include:

  • 2,410 games played
  • 2,884 hits
  • 476 doubles
  • 172 triples
  • .317 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Zack Wheat
ESPN Sports - Zack Wheat


Jackie Robinson (1962)

Jackie Robinson, the first Black major league baseball player, played for 10 years with the Brooklyn Dodgers. He started his baseball career in college where he was an all around outstanding athlete. After a stint in the army, Robinson played with the Negro League. His big chance came in 1945 when he was signed by Branch Rickey to be the first Black player to join the Brooklyn Dodgers and major league baseball. He spent 1946 in the minor leagues and joined the Dodgers the following year.

Robinson played first base in 1947, but he was moved to second base the following year. He continued to play for the Brooklyn Dodgers through the 1956 season. After that season, he was traded to the New York Giants but he retired from baseball to enter private business.

Robinson was awarded the first Rookie of the Year award in 1947. Two years later, he was named the National League MVP. In 1997, MLB honored Robinson by retiring his number. Only Mariano Rivera, closer for the New York Yankees, still wears the number 42, but when he retires, no major league player will have that number.

Robinson played in over 100 games in each of his 10 seasons with the Brooklyn Dodgers. His statistics during that time include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 203 in 1949
  • 6 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 39 in 1950
  • 5 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 37 in 1949
  • 6 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .342 in 1949

Career statistics for Robinson include:

  • 1,382 games played
  • 1,518 hits
  • 273 doubles
  • 197 stolen bases
  • .311 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jackie Robinson
ESPN Sports - Jackie Robinson


Burleigh Grimes (1964)

Burleigh Grimes, major league baseball's last official spitballer, pitched for seven teams over a 19 year career. He started his professional baseball career in 1912 in the minor leagues and it took almost five years for him to make it to the major leagues. In 1916, he pitched in six games for the Pittsburgh Pirates. The following season, his first full one in the major leagues, Grimes had a 3-16 record with 72 strikeouts and a 3.53 ERA.

After a relatively poor showing with the Pirates in 1917, Grimes moved to the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers in 1918. He had a much stronger first season with Brooklyn, pitching in 40 games and ending the season with a 19-9 record and a 2.14 ERA. Three years later, in 1921, Grimes led the American League in wins and strikeouts. That season he had a 22-13 record with 136 strikeouts to 76 walks and a 2.83 ERA in 37 games.

In 1927, Grimes played for one season with the New York Giants. The following year, he returned to the Pirates and this time he had a good strong season with them. In 1928, Grimes had a 25-14 record with 3 saves and a 2.99 ERA in 48 games.

After playing with the Pirates for two seasons, Grimes moved to the Boston Braves in 1930. He didn't stay long with Boston, however, and after just 11 games, he was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals. From 1931-1934, Grimes played with four teams, going from the Cardinals to the Cubs in 1932, then back to the Cardinals in 1933. In 1934, his last season in the major leagues, Grimes pitched in four games with the Cardinals, then ten games with the New York Yankees, and he ended his career with eight final games with the Pirates.

In 1935, after retiring as a major league pitcher, Grimes was a manager in the minor leagues for two seasons. He returned to the major leagues in 1937 to manage the Brooklyn Dodgers. His record as a manager was 131 wins against 171 losses over a two year period. Grimes left major league baseball after the 1938 season and he later became a minor league manager and scout.

Statistics for Grimes in 18 full seasons (1917-1934) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 25 in 1928
  • 4 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.14 in 1918

Career statistics for Grimes include:

  • 616 games played
  • 4,179.2 innings pitched
  • 270-212 win-loss record
  • 1,512 strikeouts to 1,295 walks
  • 3.53 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Burleigh Grimes
ESPN Sports - Burleigh Grimes


Roy Campanella (1969)

Because his mother was African-American, Roy Campanella was barred from major league baseball until Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947. As a result, Campanella started his professional baseball career in the Negro Leagues in 1937 at the age of just 16. In 1942 and 1943, he played in the Mexican League. Three years later, he was in the Dodgers' organization, playing for two years with their minor league teams.

Campanella played in 83 games in 1948, his first season in the major leagues. The next season he played in 130 games and batted .287 with 125 hits, 22 doubles, 22 home runs, and 82 RBIs.

In 1951, Campanella won his first of three National League MVP awards. That season he batted .325 with 164 hits, 33 doubles, 33 home runs, and 108 RBIs in 143 games. Two years later, he won his second MVP award and he led the National League in RBIs. He batted .312 with 162 hits, 26 doubles, 41 home runs, and 142 RBIs in 144 games in 1953. Campanella won his third MVP award in 1955 when he batted .318 with 142 hits, 20 doubles, 32 home runs, and 107 RBIs in 123 games.

Campanella was an excellent fielding catcher. His career fielding statistics include:

  • 1,183 games played
  • 85 errors
  • 550 assists
  • 6,520 putouts
  • .988 fielding percentage

Campanella had his career tragically ended by a car accident in 1958 that left him paralyzed. After his playing career ended, Campanella worked with the Dodgers as an assistant supervisor of scouting and a special coach in Spring training.

Batting statistics for Campanella in 10 seasons (1948-1957) in the major leagues include:

  • 2 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 164 in 1951
  • 4 seasons with 20 or more doubles, with a high of 33 in 1951
  • 7 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 41 in 1953
  • 3 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 142 in 1953
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .325 in 1951

Career batting statistics for Campanella include:

  • 1,215 games played
  • 1,161 hits
  • 178 doubles
  • 242 home runs
  • 856 RBIs
  • .276 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Roy Campanella
ESPN Sports - Roy Campanella
Baseball Reference.com - Roy Campanella


Sandy Koufax (1972)

Sandy Koufax played baseball in college before being signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1954. The following June, he played in only twelve games with the Dodgers. His second year was a struggle and he ended the season with a 4.91 ERA in 16 games. In 1957, although he was in the starting rotation at the beginning of the season, he spent much of the season on the bench. The next year, his first season with over 150 innings pitched, Koufax had an 11-11 record with 131 strikeouts to 105 walks and a 4.48 ERA in 40 games.

From 1958 through 1960, Koufax moved in and out of the starting rotation, being plagued through those seasons with injuries. In 1960, he asked for a trade since he wasn't playing enough. The Dodgers gave him a chance in 1961 and Koufax rewarded them with a strong year, winning 18 games. He led major league baseball in strikeouts that year with 269, a statistic which broke Christy Mathewson's 58-year-old MLB strikeout record.

In 1962, Koufax led the National League in ERA. The next year was the first of four very strong seasons for Koufax. That year he won his first of three Cy Young awards, his first of three National League Triple Crowns for pitchers, and the National League MVP award. He led the league in wins, ERA, strikeouts, and shutouts. In 1963, Koufax had a 25-5 record with 306 strikeouts to 58 walks and an ERA of 1.88 in 40 games. His outstanding performance that year continued into the post-season when he won the World Series MVP award for pitching in two games and winning both with a 1.50 ERA.

Koufax was diagnosed with traumatic arthritis in 1964 and it limited his pitching to 29 games. However, he came back strong in 1965, winning again the National League Cy Young award, Triple Crown for pitchers, and another World Series MVP award. That season he again led the National League in wins, ERA, and strikeouts, ending the season with a 26-8 record, 382 strikeouts to 71 walks, and a 2.04 ERA. He pitched his only perfect game on September 9, 1965. In that game, Koufax struck out 14 batters, the most batters struck out in any perfect game.

In 1966, his last season in the major leagues, Koufax had another stellar year. He won his third Cy Young award and third Triple Crown, leading the National League once again in wins, ERA, strikeouts, and shutouts. He played in 41 games that season with a 27-9 record, 317 strikeouts to 77 walks, and a 1.73 ERA. Although Koufax was at the height of his career in 1966, he chose to retire after the season due to his painful arthritis.

After retiring as a major league player, Koufax had a short career (1967-1972) as a broadcaster with the NBC Saturday Game of the Week. Several years later, he took a job as a minor league pitching coach for the LA Dodgers, a position he held from 1979 to 1989. In 2007, the Israel Baseball League honored Koufax by selecting him as the final player for the league. Koufax, however, declined the opportunity to pitch again after 40 years.

Statistics for Koufax in 10 full seasons (1957-1966) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 27 wins in 1966
  • 6 seasons with over 200 strikeouts, with a high of 382 in 1965
  • 5 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.73 in 1966

Career statistics for Koufax include:

  • 397 games played
  • 2,324.1 innings pitched
  • 165-87 win-loss record
  • 2,396 strikeouts to 817 walks
  • 2.76 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Sandy Koufax
ESPN Sports - Sandy Koufax


Duke Snider (1980)

Duke Snider signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers at the age of seventeen. He played in the minor leagues for four years before being called up to the Dodgers in 1947. In his first year in the major leagues, he played in just 40 games. The following year, he was still a part-time player, appearing in just 53 games. In 1949, his first full season in the major leagues, Snider batted .292 with 161 hits, 28 doubles, 23 home runs, and 92 RBIs in 146 games.

In 1950, Snider led the National League in hits. That season he batted .321 with 199 hits in 152 games. Five seasons later, he led the league in RBIs with 136. In 1956, he was the National League leader in home runs and walks. He had 43 home runs and walked 99 times in that season.

After fourteen successful years with the Dodgers, Snider was plagued by injuries and he played in only 85 games in 1961 and 80 games the following year. At the end of the 1962 season, the Dodgers sold his contract to the New York Mets. After a year with the Mets, Snider asked to be traded to a winning team and, at the start of the 1964 season, his contract was sold to the San Francisco Giants. He retired after one year with the Giants. In 1964, his last season in the major leagues, Snider played in 91 games and batted .210.

Snider was a very good defensive player. His career fielding statistics at center field include:

  • 1,589 games played
  • 59 errors
  • 3,642 putouts
  • .984 fielding percentage

After retiring as a major league player, Snider was a manager in the minor leagues for four seasons (1965-1967, 1972).

Batting statistics for Snider in 18 seasons (1947-1964) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with over 150 hits, with highs of 198 in 1953 and 199 in 1950 and 1954
  • 5 seasons with over 30 doubles, with highs of 38 in 1953 and 39 in 1954
  • 10 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 43 in 1956
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 136 in 1955
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .341 in 1954

Career batting statistics for Snider include:

  • 2,143 games played
  • 2,116 hits
  • 358 doubles
  • 407 home runs
  • 1,333 RBIs
  • .295 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Duke Snider
ESPN Sports - Duke Snider
Baseball Reference.com - Duke Snider


Don Drysdale (1984)

Don Drysdale started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1954. After two years in the minors, he became part of the Brooklyn Dodgers pitching team in 1956, playing in 25 games with them. He pitched in 99.0 innings and had a 5-5 record with an ERA of 2.64. The following season, his first full one as part of the starting rotation for the Dodgers, Drysdale had a 17-9 record, 148 strikeouts to 61walks, and a 2.69 ERA in 34 games.

Drysdale had his best years with the Dodgers after they moved to Los Angeles. In 1959, Drysdale led the National League in strikeouts with 242. Three years later, in 1962, he had his best season, leading the league in wins and strikeouts. That season he had a 25-9 record, 232 strikeouts, and an ERA of 2.83 in 43 games. Drysdale won the National League Cy Young award in 1962.

In addition to being an outstanding pitcher, Drysdale was known for his good hitting. In 1965, he was the only .300 or better hitter for the Dodgers. Over his 14 year career, he hit 29 home runs and had 218 hits.

One of Drysdale's major accomplishments as a pitcher was his 58 consecutive scoreless innings in 1968. This was an MLB record that Drysdale held until 1988 when it was broken by Orel Hershiser. The following year, his last one in the major leagues, Drysdale pitched in just 12 games for the Dodgers.

After retiring as a major league baseball player, Drysdale had a second successful career as a baseball broadcaster. His radio and TV broadcasting career included time with several different teams:

  • 1970-1971, Montreal Expos
  • 1972, Texas Rangers
  • 1973-1979, 1981, California Angels
  • 1982-1987, Chicago White Sox
  • 1988-1993, Los Angeles Dodgers
  • 1978-1986, ABC TV

Statistics for Drysdale in 14 seasons (1956-1969) in the major leagues include:

  • 2 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 25 in 1962
  • 10 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 251 in 1963
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.15 in 1968

Career statistics for Don Drysdale include:

  • 518 games played
  • 3,432.0 innings pitched
  • 209-166 win-loss record
  • 2,486 strikeouts to 855 walks
  • 2.95 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Don Drysdale
ESPN Sports - Don Drysdale


Pee Wee Reese (1984)

Pee Wee Reese was a shortstop with the Brooklyn Dodgers for 15 years. He played in the minor leagues from 1938 through 1939 and made his major league debut with the Dodgers in 1940. However, he was injured that year and ended up playing in only 84 games. The following season, his first full one in the major leagues, Reese played in 152 games and he batted .229 with 136 hits and 23 doubles.

From 1943 through 1945, Reese served in the US navy. When he returned to the Dodgers in 1946, he had his first strong season, batting .284 with 154 hits in 152 games. The next year, he led the National League in walks with 104 walks to only 67 strikeouts. That season he again batted .284 with 135 hits, 24 doubles, and 73 RBIs in 142 games.

In 1952, Reese led the National League in stolen bases with 30. His best season came two years later, in 1954, when he batted .309 with 171 hits, 35 doubles, and 69 RBIs in 141 games. That was his only season with a batting average over .300. In 1958, his last season in the major leagues, Reese became a backup infielder and he played in only 59 games that season.

After retiring as a player, Reese became a TV network broadcaster, working for CBS (1960-1965) and NBC (1966-1968). He also was a broadcaster during the 1967 and 1968 World Series games.

Statistics for Reese in 16 seasons (1940-1958) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 176 in 1951
  • 2 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 35 in 1954
  • 5 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 30 in 1952

Career statistics for Reese include:

  • 2,166 games played
  • 2,170 hits
  • 330 doubles
  • 885 RBIs
  • 232 stolen bases
  • .269 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Pee Wee Reese
ESPN Sports - Pee Wee Reese


Don Sutton (1998)

Before being signed by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1964, Don Sutton played baseball in college. He spent only one year in the minor leagues before joining the Dodgers. In 1966, his first year in the major leagues, Sutton had a 12-12 record with 209 strikeouts to 52 walks and a 2.99 ERA in 37 games.

In 1972, Sutton led the National League in shutouts. That season he had a 19-9 record with 207 strikeouts to 63 walks and a 2.08 ERA in 33 games. Five years later, in 1977, Sutton was named the MLB All Star Game MVP.

Sutton led the National League in ERA in 1980. That season he had a 2.20 ERA with a 13-5 record in 32 games. Sutton left the Dodgers after the 1980 season and he went to the Houston Astros for two seasons. After pitching in 27 games with the Astros in 1982, he moved to the Milwaukee Brewers for his next two seasons. In 1985, he again switched teams, this time going to the Oakland Athletics for most of the season. After 29 games with Oakland, Sutton went to the California Angels to finish the season with five more games. He stayed with the Angels through the 1987 season and ended his career with the Dodgers in 1988. Sutton played in 16 games in his last season in the major leagues.

As a pitcher with the Dodgers, Sutton became the all-time Dodgers leader in wins with 233, games pitched with 550, innings pitched with 3,814, strikeouts with 2,696, and shutouts with 52.

After his career as a major league baseball player ended, Sutton became a broadcaster with TBS and the Atlanta Braves. He held that position from 1989 through 2006. From 2007 to 2009, he was a broadcaster with the MASN network and the Washington Nationals. His most recent position is as a radio broadcaster for the Atlanta Braves.

Statistics for Sutton in 23 seasons (1966-1988) in the major leagues include:

  • 14 seasons with 150 or more strikeouts, with a high of 217 in 1969
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.08 in 1972

Career statistics for Sutton include:

  • 774 games played
  • 5,282.1 innings pitched
  • 324-256 win-loss record
  • 3,574 strikeouts to 1,343 walks
  • 3.26 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Don Sutton
ESPN Sports - Don Sutton