SF Giants - Baseball Hall of Fame

Christy Mathewson (1936)

Christy Mathewson started playing semi-pro baseball at the age of 14 and, by the time he was in a university, he was a minor league pitcher. He left the university in 1899 to play professional baseball full-time and a year later, after two years in the minor leagues, he started his 16 year career with the Giants. In his first season, Mathewson pitched in only 6 games before the Giants sent him back to the minor leagues. At that point, the Cincinnati Reds bought his contract, but they traded him back to the Giants after just a short time.

In 1901, his first full season in the major leagues, Mathewson pitched in 40 games and he ended the season with a 20-17 record, 221 strikeouts, and an ERA of 2.41. Two years later, he led the National League in strikeouts, a feat he repeated four more times in his career (1904, 1905, 1907, 1908).

In 1905, Mathewson won his first National League Triple Crown, leading the league in wins, strikeouts, and ERA. That season he had a 31-9 record, 206 strikeouts to 64 walks, and a 1.28 ERA. Two years later, he again led the National League in wins with 24 and in strikeouts with 178.

In 1908, Mathewson won his second National League Triple Crown with 37 wins, 259 strikeouts, and an ERA of 1.43. The following season, he had his lowest career ERA (1.14). In 1910, he led the National League for the fourth time in wins, ending his season with 27 wins to 9 losses. Mathewson led the National League two more times in ERA - in 1911, he had an ERA of 1.99 and in 1913, his ERA was 2.06.

The Giants traded Mathewson to the Cincinnati Reds in 1916 and he served as their manager for the next three seasons (1916-1918). His record as manager of the Reds was 164 wins to 176 losses.

After finishing his major league baseball career, Mathewson served in WW I. He returned to baseball in 1919 to become a coach for the Giants. He stayed in that position for two years. In 1923, he became the part-time president of the Boston Braves.

Statistics for Mathewson in 17 seasons (1900-1916) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons of 20 or more wins, with a high of 37 wins in 1908
  • 8 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 267 in 1903
  • 13 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.14 in 1909

Career statistics for Mathewson include:

  • 635 games played
  • 4,780.2 innings pitched
  • 373-188 win-loss record
  • 2502 strikeouts to 844 walks
  • 2.13 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Christy Mathewson
ESPN Sports - Christy Mathewson


Buck Ewing (1939)

Buck Ewing started his major league career in 1880 with the Troy Trojans of the National League. When the team folded after the 1882 season, he moved to the New York Gothams/Giants and stayed with them through the 1892 season. In 1890, he was made their player-manager for that one season.

After the 1892 season, Ewing played for two seasons with the Cleveland Spiders, a team that folded in 1899. Ewing spent his last three seasons in the major leagues, 1895-1897, as player-manager for the Cincinnati Reds. He played in just one game in 1897.

In 1884, Ewing led the National League in home runs and triples. The previous year, he became the first major league player to hit 10 home runs.

After his playing career ended, Ewing continued to serve as manager of the Reds through the 1899 season. The next season, he returned to the Giants as manager for one season. Ewing's managerial record was 489 wins to 395 losses.

Statistics for Ewing in 16 seasons (1881-1896) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 20 in 1884
  • 8 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 53 in 1888
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .347 in 1891

Career statistics for Ewing include:

  • 1,315 games played
  • 1,625 hits
  • 178 triples
  • 354 stolen bases
  • .303 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Buck Ewing
ESPN Sports - Buck Ewing


Roger Bresnahan (1945)

Roger Bresnahan started playing baseball as a child and by the age of 16, he was playing semi-pro ball. He started as a pitcher in the minor leagues. In 1897, the Washington Senators of the National League, a team that folded after the 1899 season, purchased Bresnahan's contract. He pitched for the Senators in six games before being released at the end of the 1897 season over a salary dispute.

Bresnahan spent the 1898 and 1899 seasons in the minor leagues before joining the Chicago Orphans/Cubs in 1900. He played in just two games with Chicago before moving to the Orioles (modern day New York Yankees) in 1901. Bresnahan was a catcher and outfielder with the Orioles and he batted .268 with 79 hits in 86 games in 1901.

The Orioles released Bresnahan in July, 1902, and he was signed by the New York Giants. For his first few seasons with the Giants, Bresnahan played various positions until he was made their catcher in 1905.

After the 1908 season, the Giants traded Bresnahan to the Cardinals, where he was made player-manager. He was fired after the 1912 season but he was then signed by the Chicago Cubs with a three-year contract. In 1915, his last season in the major leagues, Bresnahan was player-manager for the Cubs.

After finishing his playing career in the major leagues, Bresnahan bought and played for a minor league team from 1916 through 1918. From the mid-1920s through 1931, Bresnahan returned to the major leagues as a coach for the Giants and the Detroit Tigers.

Career statistics for Bresnahan include:

  • 1,446 games played
  • 1,252 hits
  • 218 doubles
  • 212 stolen bases
  • .279 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Roger Bresnahan
ESPN Sports - Roger Bresnahan


Jim O'Rourke (1945)

Jim O'Rourke started his major league career in 1872 with the Middletown Mansfields, a team in the National Association that lasted for only one season. The following season, O'Rourke was with the Boston Red Stockings/Boston Red Caps (modern day Braves) and he stayed with them through the 1878 season. He then switched to another short-lived team, the Providence Grays, a National League team that folded after the 1885 season. O'Rourke only lasted one season with the Grays and in 1880, he returned to the Boston Red Caps, but again just for one season.

In 1881, O'Rourke joined the Buffalo Bisons, another team doomed to fail in the National League. After serving as player-manager for the team for four years, O'Rourke left the Bisons after the 1884 season, a year before the team folded. In 1885, O'Rourke joined the New York Giants, a team he stayed with through the 1892 season. He finished his last full season in the major leagues in 1893 as player-manager with the Washington Senators but he returned in 1904 to the Giants for one final game as a player.

After leaving the major leagues, O'Rourke played in the minor leagues for a time. He also was president of a minor league team. While he was still in the major leagues, O'Rourke did something quite unusual for a baseball player - he earned a law degree from Yale University in 1887.

Statistics for O'Rourke in 18 seasons (1876-1893) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 172 in 1890
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 37 in 1890
  • 3 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 16 in 1885
  • 4 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 46 in 1887
  • 11 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with highs of .360 in 1890 in 111 games and .362 in 1877 in 61 games

Career statistics for O'Rourke include:

  • 1,774 games played
  • 2,304 hits
  • 414 doubles
  • 132 triples
  • 1,010 RBIs
  • 191 stolen bases
  • .310 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jim O'Rourke
ESPN Sports - Jim O'Rourke


Joe McGinnity (1946)

Joe McGinnity worked in the coal mines as a child and he played baseball with a coal miners' team. He started pitching in 1888 while playing semi-pro baseball. In 1893, he started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues but then followed that with five years back with semi-pro baseball teams.

McGinnity finally made it to the major leagues in 1899 with the Baltimore Orioles of the National League. That season he played in 48 games with a 28-16 record, 74 strikeouts to 93 walks, and a 2.68 ERA. In 1900, he joined the Brooklyn Superbas/Dodgers but he only stayed with them for one season. The following year, he played again with an Orioles team, but this time it was with the American League team that eventually became the New York Yankees. The team released McGinnity in July, 1902, and he then signed with the New York Giants, the team he stayed with through 1908, his last season in the major leagues.

In 1899, McGinnity led the National League in wins, a feat he repeated four more times (1900, 1903, 1904, 1906). He led the league in games started and innings pitched in 1903 and in ERA in 1904.

After retiring as a major league pitcher, McGinnity owned, managed and played for minor league teams from 1909-1917 and from 1922-1925. In 1926, he was a coach for the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Statistics for McGinnity in 10 seasons (1899-1908) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 35 in 1904
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.61 in 1904

Career statistics for McGinnity include:

  • 465 games played
  • 3,441.1 innings pitched
  • 246-142 win-loss record
  • 1,068 strikeouts to 812 walks
  • 2.66 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe McGinnity
ESPN Sports - Joe McGinnity


Carl Hubbell (1947)

Carl Hubbell, a screwball pitcher, played with the New York Giants for 16 years. He was first signed by the Detroit Tigers in 1926, but he only played in the minor leagues during his two years with them. In 1928, the Tigers released Hubbell and the Giants signed him. Hubbell pitched 124.0 innings in his first year with the Giants and he ended the season with a 10-6 record and 2.83 ERA. The next season, his first full season as part of the Giants starting rotation, Hubbell had an 18-11 record with a 3.69 ERA in 39 games. He pitched the only no hitter of his career in 1929.

In 1933, Hubbell won his first National League MVP award and he led the league in wins and ERA. That season he had 23 wins to 12 losses and an ERA of 1.66 in 45 games. Hubbell led the National League in ERA again the next season. In 1936, he won his second National League MVP award and once more led the league in wins and ERA. He ended that season with a 26-6 record, 123 strikeouts to 57 walks, and a 2.31 ERA in 42 games.

Hubbell led the National League in wins and strikeouts for the last time in his career in 1937. That season he had a 22-8 record with 159 strikeouts to 55 walks. In 1943, his last season in the major leagues, Hubbell played in just 12 games and he ended the season with a 4.91 ERA.

After leaving major league baseball as a pitcher, Hubbell spent many years (1943-1979) as the Giants' Director of Player Development. He left that position in 1979 and the following year he became a scout for the Giants until 1988.

Statistics for Hubbell in 16 seasons (1928-1943) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 26 in 1936
  • 4 seasons with 150 or more strikeouts, with a high of 159 in 1937
  • 7 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.66 in 1933

Career statistics for Hubbell include:

  • 535 games played
  • 3,590.1 innings pitched
  • 253-154 win-loss record
  • 1,677 strikeouts to 725 walks
  • 2.98 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Carl Hubbell
ESPN Sports - Carl Hubbell


Mel Ott (1951)

Mel Ott started his professional baseball career and major league career in 1926 with the New York Giants. Unlike most other players, Ott never played in the minor leagues but he was just a part-time player for the Giants in his first two seasons, playing in only 35 games in 1926 and in 82 games in 1927.

In 1928, his first full season in the major leagues, Ott batted .322 with 140 hits, 26 doubles, 18 home runs, and 77 RBIs in 124 games. The next season, he led the National League in walks with 113 walks to 38 strikeouts. Ott led the league in walks five more times in his career (1931-1933, 1939, 1942). In 1929, he had career highs in doubles with 37, home runs with 42, and RBIs with 151. In 1930, Ott had a career high batting average of .349.

Ott led the National League in home runs six times in his career (1932, 1934, 1936-1938, 1942). In 1934, he also led the league in RBIs. That season he batted .326 with 190 hits, 29 doubles, 10 triples, 35 home runs, and 135 RBIs in 153 games. The next year Ott had a career high of 191 hits.

Ott played in right field for most of his career. His career fielding statistics as a right fielder include:

  • 2,161 games played
  • 88 errors
  • 238 assists
  • 4,153 putouts
  • .980 fielding percentage

Ott was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. He held the title of National League home run leader from 1937 until 1966, when the record was broken by Willie Mays. Ott was also the first National League player to have eight consecutive 100-RBI seasons. Since then, only Willie Mays, Sammy Sosa, Chipper Jones, and Albert Pujols have achieved that record.

In 1942, Ott was made player-manager of the Giants. His last full season as a player was in 1945 and he had a strong season, ending with a .308 batting average. He played in 31 games in 1946 and in just four games in 1947, his last season as a major league player. He continued to manage the Giants in 1948. Ott was not as successful a manager as he was a player and he ended his managerial career with a 464-530 win-loss record.

From 1955 through 1958, Ott was a radio and TV broadcaster for major league baseball. He died tragically at the age of just 49 in an auto accident.

Ott played in over 100 games in each of 18 seasons (1928-1945). His batting statistics during those 18 seasons include:

  • 12 seasons with over 150 hits, with highs of 190 in 1934 and 191 in 1935
  • 5 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 37 in 1929
  • 15 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 42 in 1929
  • 9 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 151 in 1929
  • 10 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .349 in 1930

Career batting statistics for Ott include:

  • 2,730 games played
  • 2,876 hits
  • 488 doubles
  • 511 home runs
  • 1,860 RBIs
  • .304 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Mel Ott
ESPN Sports - Mel Ott
Baseball Reference.com - Mel Ott


Bill Terry (1954)

Bill Terry started his professional baseball career in 1915 in the minor leagues. He played in the minors for two years and then didn't play professional baseball again until 1922 when he went back to the minor leagues. A year later, he made his first start in the major leagues, playing in three games with the New York Giants. He played in 77 games in 1924 and had a batting average of .239. The following season, his first full season in the major leagues, Terry batted .319 with 156 hits, 31 doubles, and 70 RBIs in 133 games.

Terry was a strong hitter, leading the National League in batting average in 1930. His .401 average that year marked the last time a National League hitter batted over .400. He also holds the National League record for the highest lifetime batting average for a left-handed hitter with .341. In addition to a .401 batting average, Terry had 254 hits, 39 doubles, 23 home runs, and 129 RBIs in 1930, making it his best season. That year, he also led the National League in hits and in singles.

In 1931, Terry led the National League in triples with 20. Three years later, he led the league in singles for the second time. In 1934, Terry batted .354 with 213 hits, 30 doubles, and 83 RBIs in 153 games.

Terry was a first baseman for the Giants for most of his career. His career fielding statistics at first base include:

  • 1,579 games played
  • 138 errors
  • 1,108 assists
  • 1,334 double plays
  • 15,972 putouts
  • .992 fielding percentage

Terry was named player-manager of the Giants in 1932. He played in 79 games with a .310 batting average in 1936, his last season as a major league player. He continued to successfully manage the New York Giants through 1941. During his 10 years as manager of the Giants, Terry had an 823-661 record and he led the Giants to three pennants and a World Series win in 1933.

Batting statistics for Terry in 14 seasons (1923-1936) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 100 hits, with a high of 254 in 1930
  • 9 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 43 in 1931
  • 5 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 20 in 1927
  • 3 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 28 in 1932
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 129 in 1930
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .401 in 1930

Career batting statistics for Terry include:

  • 1,721 games played
  • 2,193 hits
  • 373 doubles
  • 112 triples
  • 154 home runs
  • 1,078 RBIs
  • .341 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bill Terry
ESPN Sports - Bill Terry


Tim Keefe (1964)

Tim Keefe started his professional baseball career in 1880 with the Troy Trojans, playing in 12 games that season. He stayed with the Trojans until they folded in 1883. He then moved to the New York Metropolitans of the American Association, a team that folded in 1887. In 1885, Keefe went to the New York Giants and stayed there until 1891. After playing with the Giants in eight games in 1891, Keefe went to the Philadelphia Phillies, playing in eleven games with them that season. He retired after the 1893 season in which he pitched in 23 games.

In 1880, Keefe posted the lowest ERA in one season in major league baseball history with a 0.86 ERA. Eight years later, he won the National League Triple Crown for pitchers. He led the National League in ERA three times (1880, 1885, 1888), wins twice (1886, 1888), and strikeouts in 1888.

After retiring from major league baseball, Keefe umpired and coached at three prestigious universities (Harvard, Princeton, Tufts).

Statistics for Keefe in 14 seasons (1880-1893) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 20 wins, with highs of 41 in 1883 and 42 in 1886
  • 6 seasons with over 200 strikeouts, with a high of 361 in 1883
  • 8 seasons with an ERA below 3.00, with lows of 0.86 in 1880 in 12 games and 1.58 in 1885 in 46 games

Career statistics for Keefe include:

  • 599 games played
  • 5,047.1 innings pitched
  • 342-225 win-loss record
  • 2,545 strikeouts to 1,224 walks
  • 2.62 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Tim Keefe
ESPN Sports - Tim Keefe


John Ward (1964)

John Ward played baseball at Pennsylvania State University after helping to start their baseball program. A few years later, he started playing semi-pro baseball. In 1878, he signed to pitch with the Providence Grays of the National League. However, the following year, Ward also played third base and in the outfield for the team. He pitched in 587.0 innings in 70 games in 1879 and in 595.0 innings in 70 games in 1880. He was player-manager for the Grays in 1880, the year he pitched a perfect game, the second in major league baseball history.

After the 1882 season, Ward's contract was sold to the New York Gothams/Giants. In his second season with the Giants (1884), Ward suffered an arm injury that ended his pitching days. He was a center fielder for the rest of the 1884 season but in 1885, he was made their shortstop. In addition to playing for the Giants, Ward was manager of the team in 1884.

After the 1889 season, Ward helped start the Players' League and he became player-manager for the Brooklyn Ward's Wonders. When the league folded a year later, Ward went to the Brooklyn Grooms/Dodgers as player-manager, a position he held with the team for two seasons. In 1893, Ward returned to the Giants as player-manager. He retired at the age of 34 after the 1894 season.

Ward was very intelligent, attending a university for the first time at the age of just 13. In 1885, he graduated from Columbia Law School and after retiring from major league baseball, he became a lawyer, often representing baseball players. He also was president and part owner of the Boston Braves.

Statistics for Ward as a pitcher in six seasons (1878-1883) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 47 in 1879
  • 230 strikeouts in 1880, 239 strikeouts in 1879
  • 6 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.51 in 1878

Ward played in over 100 games as a batter in each of 11 seasons (1884-1894). His statistics during that time include:

  • 4 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 193 in 1893
  • 6 seasons with over 40 stolen bases, with a high of 111 in 1887
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .338 in 1887

Career statistics for Ward as a pitcher include:

  • 292 games played
  • 2,461.2 innings pitched
  • 164-102 win-loss record
  • 920 strikeouts to 253 walks
  • 2.10 ERA

Career statistics for Ward as a batter include:

  • 1,825 games played
  • 2,104 hits
  • 540 stolen bases
  • .275 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - John Ward
ESPN Sports - John Ward


Rube Marquard (1971)

Rube Marquard started his major league baseball career in the minor leagues in 1906. He made his first appearance with the New York Giants in 1908 but he played in just one game with them that season. The following season he was a starting pitcher for the Giants, a position he held until 1915 when he moved to the Giants' New York rival in the National League, the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers. Marquard pitched for the Dodgers through the 1920 season but he pitched in just 8 games in 1919.

After the 1921 season, Marquard went to the Cincinnati Reds for a year and then to the Boston Braves for four seasons. He pitched in just six games in 1924, his next to last season in the major leagues. In 1933, eight years after retiring from major league baseball, Marquard was a pitcher and manager for a minor league team for a season.

Marquard led the National League in strikeouts in 1911 and in wins the following season. He had a no-hitter on April 15, 1915.

Statistics for Marquard in 17 seasons (1909-1925) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 26 in 1912
  • 3 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 237 in 1911
  • 9 seasons with an ERA of 3.00 or lower, with a low of 1.58 in 1916

Career statistics for Marquard include:

  • 536 games played
  • 3,306.2 innings pitched
  • 201-177 win-loss record
  • 1,593 strikeouts to 858 walks
  • 3.08 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Rube Marquard
ESPN Sports - Rube Marquard


Ross Youngs (1972)

Ross Youngs started in the minor leagues in 1914. Three years later, he was called up to the New York Giants to play in seven games with them. He spent the next nine years with the Giants. His career ended in 1927 when he tragically died at the age of just 30.

Statistics for Youngs in nine seasons (1918-1926) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 204 in 1920
  • 4 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 34 in 1922
  • 5 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 16 in 1921
  • 3 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 24 in 1919
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .356 in 1924

Career statistics for Youngs include:

  • 1,211 games played
  • 1,491 hits
  • 236 doubles
  • 93 triples
  • 592 RBIs
  • 153 stolen bases
  • .322 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ross Youngs
ESPN Sports - Ross Youngs


George Kelly (1973)

George Kelly started his professional baseball career in 1914 in the minor leagues. He made his first start in the major leagues with the New York Giants in 1915 but in his first two seasons, he moved back and forth between the minors and the Giants, playing in less than 50 games each season with the Giants. After 11 games with the Giants in 1917, he moved to the Pittsburgh Pirates but only played in eight games with them and then went again to the Giants who sent Kelly back to the minors. In 1918, he served in the US military. When he returned to the Giants in 1919, they again sent him to the minors and he played in just 32 games with the Giants that season.

Kelly had his first full season in the major leagues in 1920, playing in 155 games with the Giants. That season he led the National League in RBIs. He batted .266 and had 157 hits, 22 doubles, and 94 RBIs. The following season, he led the league in home runs with 23.

Kelly's best season was perhaps 1924 when he batted .324 with 185 hits, 37 doubles, and 21 home runs. He again led the National League in RBIs, this time with 136.

Prior to the 1927 season, Kelly was traded to the Cincinnati Reds. Three seasons later, after playing in 51 games with the Reds, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs. Kelly spent 1931 in the minor leagues but he returned to the majors the following year, ending his major league playing career with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Kelly was a first baseman for most of his career and he was an excellent fielder. His career fielding statistics at first base include:

  • 1,373 games played
  • 121 errors
  • 861 assists
  • 1,113 double plays
  • 14,232 putouts
  • .992 fielding percentage

Batting statistics for Kelly in 16 seasons (1915-1932) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 194 in 1922
  • 5 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 45 in 1929
  • 3 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 21 in 1924
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 136 in 1924
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .324 in 1924

Career batting statistics for Kelly include:

  • 1,622 games played
  • 1,778 hits
  • 337 doubles
  • 148 home runs
  • 1,020 RBIs
  • .297 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - George Kelly
ESPN Sports - George Kelly
Baseball Reference.com - George Kelly


Mickey Welch (1973)

Mickey Welch started his professional baseball career with the Troy Trojans of the National League, a team that played from 1879-1882. Welch played with them from 1880 until they folded after the 1882 season. In his first season with them, he pitched 574.0 innings in 65 games, with a 34-30 win-loss record, 123 strikeouts to 80 walks, and a 2.54 ERA.

After the Trojans folded, Welch signed with the New York Gothams/Giants. He pitched 426 innings in 54 games in his first season with the Giants. He stayed with the team through 1892, playing in just one game in his last season.

Statistics for Welch in 12 seasons (1880-1891) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 44 in 1885
  • 4 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 345 in 1884
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.66 in 1885

Career statistics for Welch include:

  • 564 games played
  • 4,802.0 innings pitched
  • 307-210 win-loss record
  • 1,850 strikeouts to 1,297 walks
  • 2.71 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Mickey Welch
ESPN Sports - Mickey Welch


Roger Connor (1976)

Roger Connor played with the Troy Trojans of the National League from 1880 through 1882. When the team folded after the 1882 season, Connor joined the New York Gothams/Giants. In his first three seasons in the major leagues, Connor played in under 100 games each season.

Connor played with the Giants from 1883 through 1891. He then went to the Philadelphia Phillies for one season but returned to the Giants in 1893. The following season he was traded to the St. Louis Browns (modern day Orioles). In 1896, he was made player-manager of the Browns but he remained manager for only one season. He played in just 22 games in 1897, his last season in the major leagues. After leaving major league baseball, Connor managed in the minor leagues.

Until Babe Ruth passed him in 1921, Connor held the major league baseball record for the most career home runs. He was also the first major league player to hit a grand slam home run.

Statistics for Connor in 13 seasons (1884-1896) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 172 in 1886
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 37 in 1892
  • 9 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 25 in 1894
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 130 in 1889
  • 7 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 43 in 1887
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .371 in 1885

Career statistics for Connor include:

  • 1,997 games played
  • 2,467 hits
  • 441 doubles
  • 233 triples
  • 138 home runs
  • 1,322 RBIs
  • 244 stolen bases
  • .317 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Roger Connor
ESPN Sports - Roger Connor


Freddie Lindstrom (1976)

Freddie Lindstrom started as a minor league player in 1922 at the age of 17. Two years later, in 1924, he was with the New York Giants, playing in 52 games with them that season. The following year, his first full season in the major leagues, Lindstrom batted .287 with 102 hits and 15 doubles in 104 games.

Lindstrom had his first strong season with the Giants in 1928, batting .358 with 231 hits, 39 doubles, 14 home runs, and 107 RBIs in 153 games. He led the National League in hits that season. Two years later, in 1930, Lindstrom had his best season with career highs in hits with 231, doubles with 39, home runs with 22, and a career high batting average of .379.

Although Lindstrom played well for the Giants, they traded him at the end of the 1932 season to the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Pirates kept Lindstrom for two years before trading him to the Chicago Cubs, where he played for just one year (1935). His last year, in which he played in just 26 games, was with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Statistics for Lindstrom in 13 seasons (1924-1936) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 231 in 1928 and 1930
  • 4 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 39 in 1928, 1930, and 1933
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .379 in 1930

Career statistics for Lindstrom include:

  • 1,438 games played
  • 1,747 hits
  • 301 doubles
  • .311 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Freddie Lindstrom
Baseball Reference - Freddie Lindstrom


Amos Rusie (1977)

Amos Rusie started playing in the minor leagues at the age of 18. In 1889, he was signed by the Indianapolis Hoosiers of the National League, a team that played for only three seasons. Rusie pitched in 33 games with the team that season. When the Hoosiers folded after the 1889 season, Rusie went to the New York Gothams/Giants.

In 1894, Rusie won the National League Triple Crown for pitchers, leading the league in ERA, wins, and strikeouts. Three years later, he again led the league in ERA. During his years with the Giants, Rusie led the National League in strikeouts five times (1890, 1891, 1893-1895).

Rusie left the Giants after the 1898 season due to health issues. He didn't play at all in 1899 or 1900. He signed with the Cincinnati Reds in 1901 but he played in just three games that season, his last in the major leagues.

Statistics for Rusie in 9 seasons (1889-1898) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 36 in 1894
  • 5 seasons with over 200 strikeouts, with a high of 341 in 1890
  • 5 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.54 in 1897

Career statistics for Rusie include:

  • 462 games played
  • 3,769.2 innings pitched
  • 245-174 win-loss record
  • 1,934 strikeouts to 1,704 walks
  • 3.07 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Amos Rusie
ESPN Sports - Amos Rusie


Willie Mays (1979)

Willie Mays, one of the greatest hitters and outfielders in major league baseball history, played for 22 years, with the majority of his time with the Giants (New York and San Francisco). Mays came from a family of athletes, with a father who played amateur baseball and a mother who was a field and track participant. He started his own athletic career by playing baseball in the Negro Leagues in 1948 at the age of 17. In 1950, he was signed by the Giants and, after a little over a year in the minor leagues, he was called up to the majors in May, 1951. In his first season in the major leagues, Mays batted .274 with 127 hits, 22 doubles, 20 home runs, and 68 RBIs in 121 games. Those numbers earned him the 1951 National League Rookie of the Year award.

Mays was drafted into the army in 1952 and his professional baseball career was temporarily put on hold. Although he had limited playing time in 1952 (34 games) and no games in 1953, he maintained his baseball skills by playing baseball while in the army. When he returned to the Giants in 1954, he had a stellar year, batting .345 with 195 hits, 33 doubles, 13 triples, 41 home runs, and 110 RBIs in 151 games. That season Mays won the National League MVP award and the National League Batting title and he led the league in triples.

In 1955, Mays led the National League in home runs with 51 and in triples with 13. The following season, it was his speed that drew attention when he led the league in stolen bases with 40. In 1957, he again led the league in triples, this time with a career high of 20 triples. He also led the league in stolen bases for the second time, a feat he would repeat two more times (1958 and 1959).

Mays won the first of 12 consecutive Gold Gloves in 1957. He was an outstanding defensive player and his career fielding statistics at center field include:

  • 2,829 games played
  • 138 errors
  • 188 assists
  • 7,038 putouts
  • .981 fielding percentage

In the 1960s, Mays became one of the leading power hitters in the major leagues. He led the National League in hits in 1960 and in home runs in 1962, 1964, and 1965. He was named the MLB All Star Game MVP in 1963, in a season when he batted .314 with 197 hits, 32 doubles, 38 home runs, and 103 RBIs in 157 games. Two years later, in 1965, Mays won the National League MVP award for the second time. That season he batted .317 with 177 hits, 21 doubles, a league and career high 52 home runs, and 112 RBIs. In 1968, Mays again won the All Star Game MVP award.

Although Mays had a twenty year successful career with the Giants, they traded him in 1972 after just 19 games to the New York Mets. After playing in 69 games with the Mets in 1972 and 66 games in 1973, Mays ended his career as a major league player.

After retiring as a player, Mays became a hitting instructor for the New York Mets from 1973 through 1979. His next position, one he still holds, is as special assistant to the president of the San Francisco Giants. He started in that position in 1986.

Batting statistics for Mays in 22 seasons (1951-1973) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 208 in 1958
  • 6 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 43 in 1959
  • 5 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 20 in 1957
  • 17 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 52 in 1965
  • 10 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 141 in 1962
  • 7 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 40 in 1956
  • 10 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .347 in 1958

Career batting statistics for Mays include:

  • 2,992 games played
  • 3,283 hits
  • 523 doubles
  • 140 triples
  • 660 home runs
  • 1,903 RBIs
  • 338 stolen bases
  • .302 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Willie Mays
ESPN Sports - Willie Mays
Baseball Reference.com - Willie Mays


Travis Jackson (1982)

Travis Jackson started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1921. A year later, at the age of 18, he signed with the New York Giants and played in three games with them in 1922. The following season he played in 96 games with the Giants, batting .275 with 90 hits. In 1924, Jackson had a career high of 180 hits and a batting average of .302.

Jackson had one of his best seasons in 1930, when he had a career high batting average of .339. That season he had 146 hits, 27 doubles, and 82 RBIs in 116 games. Two seasons later, Jackson suffered from influenza and knee problems and he played in just 52 games in 1932 and 53 games in 1933. He retired as a major league player after the 1936 season.

In 1937, Jackson was a player-manager in the minor leagues, holding that position for two seasons. He then left professional baseball and didn't return until 1949. From 1949 through 1960, Jackson was a manager in the minor leagues. His record as a minor league manager was 811 wins to 721 losses.

Statistics for Jackson in 15 seasons (1922-1936) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 180 in 1924
  • 6 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .339 in 1930

Career statistics for Jackson include:

  • 1,656 games played
  • 1,768 hits
  • 291 doubles
  • 929 RBIs
  • .291 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Travis Jackson
ESPN Sports - Travis Jackson


Juan Marichal (1983)

Juan Marichal started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1958. Two years later, he joined the San Francisco Giants for 11 games. In 1961, he pitched 185.0 innings and had a 13-10 record with a 3.89 ERA in 29 games.

On June 15, 1963, Marichal pitched the only no hitter of his career. That season he led the National League in wins with 25. Two seasons later, Marichal had one of the best seasons of his career. In 1965, he had a 22-13 record with 240 strikeouts to 46 walks and an ERA of 2.13. That season he won the MLB All Star Game MVP award.

Marichal led the National League in wins for the second time in 1968. That season he had a 26-9 record with 218 strikeouts to 46 walks and a 2.43 ERA in 38 games. The next year, he led the league in ERA. In 1969, he had a 2.10 ERA and a 21-11 record.

In 1973, his last season with the Giants, Marichal had an 11-15 record with a 3.82 ERA. The Giants sold his contract to the Boston Red Sox after the 1973 season ended. Marichal played in only 11 games with the Red Sox and he was released by them at the end of the 1974 season. He then signed as a free agent with the Los Angeles Dodgers, but he played in only 2 games with them in 1975, his last season in the major leagues.

Statistics for Marichal in 13 full seasons (1961-1973) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 26 in 1968
  • 9 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 248 in 1963
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.10 in 1969

Career statistics for Marichal include:

  • 471 games played
  • 3,507.1 innings pitched
  • 243-142 win-loss record
  • 2,303 strikeouts to 709 walks
  • 2.89 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Juan Marichal
ESPN Sports - Juan Marichal


Willie McCovey (1986)

After playing in the minor leagues, Willie McCovey was signed by the San Francisco Giants, playing with them for the first time in 1959. That season he won the National League Rookie of the Year award for batting .354 with 68 hits, 13 home runs, and 38 RBIs in 52 games. The following season, his first full one in the major leagues, McCovey batted only .238 with 62 hits in 101 games.

McCovey played with the Giants through the 1973 season. His best year was probably 1969 when he won the National League MVP award and the MLB All Star Game MVP award. That season he batted .320 with 157 hits, 26 doubles, 45 home runs, and 126 RBIs in 149 games.

During his years with the Giants, McCovey led the National League in home runs three times (1963, 1968, 1969) and RBIs twice (1968, 1969). In 1974, the Giants traded McCovey to the San Diego Padres. He stayed with the Padres until 1976, when he was traded to the Oakland Athletics. He played in only 11 games with Oakland that season.

In 1977, McCovey returned to the Giants and the move proved to be good for both the team and McCovey. At the age of 39, he had a strong season, batting .280 with 134 hits, 21 doubles, 28 home runs, and 86 RBIs in 141 games. McCovey won the 1977 National League Comeback Player of the Year award for his efforts that season. He continued to play for the Giants through the 1980 season.

Statistics for McCovey in 22 seasons (1959-1980) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 158 in 1963
  • 12 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with highs of 44 in 1963 and 45 in 1969
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 126 in 1969 and 1970

Career statistics for McCovey include:

  • 2,588 games played
  • 2,211 hits
  • 353 doubles
  • 521 home runs
  • 1,555 RBIs
  • .270 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Willie McCovey
ESPN Sports - Willie McCovey


Gaylord Perry (1991)

Gaylord Perry, known as a spitball pitcher, played for eight teams over a period of 22 years in the major leagues. His longest stint was with his first team, the San Francisco Giants. Perry was signed by the Giants in 1958 and he played in the minor leagues for them for four years before being called up to the majors in 1962. However, his first season was not successful and after only thirteen games and a high ERA, Perry was sent back to the minors. In 1963, he was primarily a relief pitcher for the Giants but he made their starting rotation the following year.

In 1964, his first full season in the major leagues, Perry had a 12-11 record with 5 saves, 155 strikeouts to 43 walks, and a 2.75 ERA in 44 games. Four years later, on September 17, 1968, Perry pitched the only no hitter of his career. He ended that season with a 16-15 record and a 2.44 ERA.

Perry led the National League in wins in 1970 with 23 wins to 13 losses. After the 1971 season, the Giants traded Perry to the Cleveland Indians. In 1972, his first season with the Indians, he led the American League in wins. That season he won his first Cy Young award, ending the season with a 24-16 record, 234 strikeouts to 82 walks, and a 1.92 ERA in 41 games.

Perry pitched for three full seasons with the Indians but after just 15 games in 1975, he was traded to the Texas Rangers. The Rangers kept Perry through the 1977 season and then traded him to the San Diego Padres. In 1978, his first season with the Padres, Perry repeated his accomplishments of 1972, this time winning the National League Cy Young award. He led the league in wins with a 21-6 record in 37 games. That season he had 154 strikeouts to 66 walks with a 2.73 ERA.

In September of 1979, Perry asked for a trade back to the Rangers and the Padres granted his wish in February of 1980. However, he did not stay long with the Rangers and in August of 1980, he was traded again, this time to the New York Yankees. Perry became a free agent after only ten games with the Yankees and he signed with the Atlanta Braves for the 1981 season. After being released by Atlanta at the end of the season, he signed with the Seattle Mariners, who kept him for a little over a year. In June, 1983, after 16 games with the Mariners, Perry was designated for assignment. He then signed a contract with the Kansas City Royals and played in 14 games with them before retiring at the end of the 1983 season.

Statistics for Perry in 22 seasons (1962-1983) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 24 in 1972
  • 14 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 238 in 1973
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.92 in 1972

Career statistics for Perry include:

  • 777 games played
  • 5,350.1 innings pitched
  • 314-265 win-loss record
  • 3,534 strikeouts to 1,379 walks
  • 3.11 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Gaylord Perry
ESPN Sports - Gaylord Perry


George Davis (1998)

George Davis started playing professional baseball in the minor leagues in 1889 in Albany, New York. A year later, his contract was bought by the Cleveland Spiders of the National League, a team that folded in 1899. Davis played center field for the Spiders for two seasons, leading the National League in outfield assists in his first season. In his rookie season (1890), Davis batted .264 with 139 hits, 22 doubles, 9 triples, and 22 stolen bases in 136 games.

In 1893, the Spiders traded Davis to the New York Giants. Two years later, he was the player-manager for the team for one season. In 1897, Davis was made the regular shortstop for the Giants. That same season, Davis led the National League in RBIs.

In 1900, Davis again was named player-manager of the Giants and this time he held the position for two seasons. Following the 1901 season, Davis left the Giants and the National League for the Chicago White Sox. After one season, however, he returned to the Giants but he played in just four games with them in 1903. The following season, he returned to the White Sox and stayed with them through the 1909 season, his last as a player in the major leagues. He played in just 28 games in that final season.

Davis played in over 100 games in each of 18 seasons (1890-1902, 1904-1908). His statistics during that time include:

  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 36 in 1895
  • 7 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 27 in 1893
  • 3 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 136 in 1897
  • 17 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 65 in 1897
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .355 in 1893

Career statistics for Davis include:

  • 2,368 games played
  • 2,660 hits
  • 451 doubles
  • 163 triples
  • 1,437 RBIs
  • 616 stolen bases
  • .295 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - George Davis
ESPN Sports - George Davis


Orlando Cepeda (1999)

Orlando Cepeda came from a baseball family, with a father who played professional baseball in Puerto Rico. Cepeda started as a minor league player in 1955 before being signed by the San Francisco Giants. After three years in the minor leagues, he was in the starting lineup for the Giants in 1958. In his first season in the major leagues, Cepeda batted .312 with 188 hits, 38 doubles, and 25 home runs in 148 games. That outstanding start earned him the National League Rookie of the Year award.

Cepeda led the National League in home runs and RBIs in 1961. That year he batted .311 with 182 hits, 28 doubles, 46 home runs, and 142 RBIs in 152 games. Cepeda continued to play well for the Giants through 1964 but he was injured in 1965 and he only played in 33 games that season. The following season, after just 19 games, the Giants traded him to the St. Louis Cardinals.

In 1967, fully recovered from his injuries, Cepeda again led the National League in RBIs. That season he batted .325 with 183 hits, 37 doubles, 25 home runs, and 111 RBIs. He struggled the following season, batting just .248 with 149 hits in 157 games. Before the start of the 1969 season, the Cardinals sent Cepeda to the Atlanta Braves in exchange for Joe Torre.

Cepeda played in only 71 games with the Braves in 1971 and in 31 games in 1972 due to injuries. In July, 1972, he was traded to the Oakland Athletics after only 3 games. He then returned to Puerto Rico with the intention of retiring but in 1973, he returned to major league baseball to be the designated hitter for the Boston Red Sox. He was released at the end of the season and signed in 1974 with the Kansas City Royals. He ended his career that year after playing in just 33 games.

Cepeda was an excellent fielding first baseman for most of his major league career. His career fielding statistics at first base include:

  • 1,683 games played
  • 162 errors
  • 1,012 assists
  • 1,192 double plays
  • 14,459 putouts
  • .990 fielding percentage

After retiring as a player, Cepeda became a baseball coach in Puerto Rico. Later, he served as a scout for the Chicago White Sox and as a minor league instructor. From 1988 through 2011, he held assorted positions with the San Francisco Giants, including scout and goodwill ambassador.

Batting statistics for Cepeda in 17 seasons (1958-1974) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with highs of 191 in 1962 and 192 in 1959
  • 6 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 38 in 1958
  • 12 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 46 in 1961
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 142 in 1961
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .325 in 1967

Career batting statistics for Cepeda include:

  • 2,124 games played
  • 417 doubles
  • 379 home runs
  • 1,365 RBIs
  • .297 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Orlando Cepeda
ESPN Sports - Orlando Cepeda
Baseball Reference.com - Orlando Cepeda