Cleveland Indians - Baseball Hall of Fame

Cy Young (1937)

Cy Young, one of the greatest pitchers of all time, began his major league baseball career in 1890 with the Cleveland Spiders of the National League, a team that folded after the 1899 season. Young played in just 17 games in his first season. In 1891, he pitched in 55 games and had a 27-22 record with an ERA of 2.85. The following year he led the National League in wins with 36 and ERA with 1.93. He led the league in wins again in 1895 and in strikeouts the next season.

In 1899, Young moved to the St. Louis Perfectos/Cardinals and he pitched for them for two seasons. Then, in 1901, he moved to the American League and the Boston Red Sox.

Young had his best seasons during his time with the Red Sox (1901-1908). In 1901, his first season with the Red Sox, Young won the American League Triple Crown. That season he had a 33-10 record with 158 strikeouts to 37 walks and a 1.62 ERA. For the next two years, he led the American League in wins with a 32-11 record in 1902 and a 28-9 record in 1903. On May 5, 1904, Young pitched a perfect game.

After eight seasons in Boston, Young was traded to the Cleveland Naps/Indians after the 1908 season. In his last season with Boston, Young had a career low ERA of 1.26, a 21-11 record, and 150 strikeouts to 37 walks in 36 games.

Young, 42 years old in 1909, still played well in his final years, although he played in fewer games in 1910 and 1911. In 1909, his last full season of play, Young had a 19-15 record with a 2.26 ERA and 109 strikeouts and 59 walks. He played in just seven games with the Indians in 1911 before being traded to the Boston Rustlers/Braves. He ended his major league pitching career with 11 games with the Braves.

Young pitched three no hitter games in his career. He holds the major league record for most career wins in major league baseball history with 511 wins. He also holds the major league record for most games pitched with 7,355 and most complete games with 749.

Statistics for Young in 22 seasons (1890-1911) in the major leagues include:

  • 15 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 36 in 1892
  • 7 seasons with 150 or more strikeouts, with a high of 210 in 1905
  • 13 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.26 in 1908

Career statistics for Young include:

  • 906 games played
  • 7,354.2 innings pitched
  • 511-316 win-loss record
  • 2,803 strikeouts to 1,217 walks
  • 2.63 ERA

Source for Information
Wikipedia - Cy Young


Tris Speaker (1937)

Tris Speaker started his professional baseball career in 1906 with the Texas League. A year later, his contract was sold to the Boston Red Sox and Speaker played in seven games with Boston in 1907. The Red Sox sold Speaker's contract to the minor leagues in 1908 but they bought back his contract after a short time and he played in 31 games with Boston in 1908. The following year, Speaker became the regular center fielder for the Red Sox. In 1909, his first full season in the major leagues, Speaker batted .309 with 168 hits, 26 doubles, 13 triples, 77 RBIs, and 35 stolen bases in 143 games.

In 1912, Speaker won the American League MVP award and he led the league in home runs and doubles. That season he batted .383 with 222 hits, 53 doubles, 12 triples, 10 home runs, 90 RBIs, and 52 stolen bases in 153 games. Two years later, in 1914, he led the league in hits with 193 and doubles with 46.

Before the 1916 season, Speaker was traded to the Cleveland Indians. The value of his contract at that time was a record $40,000. In his first season with the Indians, Speaker won the American League Batting title and he led the league in hits, singles, and doubles. He batted .386 with 211 hits, 41 doubles, 79 RBIs, and 35 stolen bases.

After three years as a player for Cleveland, Speaker was made player-manager in 1919. He stayed in that dual position until he left the Indians after the 1926 season. Speaker's record as a manager was 617 wins to 520 losses. The Indians won the World Series in 1920 under Speaker's leadership.

In 1926, Speaker, along with Ty Cobb, was involved in a gambling scandal and he was forced to resign. However, both he and Cobb were cleared and Speaker returned as a player to the Washington Senators in 1927. The following season, his final major league season, he played in only 64 games with the Philadelphia Athletics.

After leaving major league baseball, Speaker became a minor league manager for two years (1929-1930). In 1933, he was the part owner of a minor league team. Speaker stayed out of professional baseball from 1934 until 1947 when he returned to the Indians. From 1947 through 1958, Speaker served as an adviser, coach and scout for the Indians.

Statistics for Speaker in 19 full seasons (1909-1927) in the major leagues include:

  • 18 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 222 in 1912
  • 16 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 59 in 1923
  • 13 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 22 in 1913
  • 10 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 52 in 1912
  • 18 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .389 in 1925

Career statistics for Speaker include:

  • 2,789 games played
  • 792 doubles
  • 222 triples
  • 3,514 hits
  • 1,529 RBIs
  • 432 stolen bases
  • .345 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Tris Speaker
ESPN Sports - Tris Speaker


Nap Lajoie (1937)

Nap Lajoie was first signed by the Philadelphia Phillies in August, 1896. In 39 games that season, he had 57 hits, 12 doubles, 7 triples, and a .326 batting average. He continued to play for the Phillies through 1900. In 1901, he moved to the American League and the Philadelphia Athletics. Before the 1902 season ended, Lajoie was traded to the Cleveland Bronchos.

At the start of the 1903 season, the Cleveland team changed its name to the Naps in honor of Lajoie. It wasn't until after he left that they became the Indians. By 1905, the team respected Lajoie enough to make him their player-manager, a position he held until 1909 when he quit managing to focus more on his playing. He continued with the Naps until 1915 when, at his request, he was traded back to the Athletics.

Lajoie played for two more seasons in the major leagues with the Athletics. He spent the 1917 and 1918 seasons playing and managing in the minor leagues before retiring in December, 1918.

Lajoie won the American League batting title five times (1901-1904, 1910) and the AL Triple Crown award in 1901. He led the National League in RBIs in 1898 and led the American League in RBIs in 1903 and 1904.

Statistics for Lajoie in 20 seasons (1897-1916) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 232 in 1901
  • 14 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 51 in 1910
  • 6 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 23 in 1897
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 127 in 1897 and 1898
  • 10 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 29 in 1904
  • 15 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .426 in 1901

Career statistics for Lajoie include:

  • 2,480 games
  • 3,242 hits
  • 657 doubles
  • 163 triples
  • 1,599 RBIs
  • 380 stolen bases
  • .338 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Nap Lajoie
ESPN Sports - Nap Lajoie


Bob Feller (1962)

Bob Feller first learned how to pitch from his father who created a "Field of Dreams" for his son on their Iowa farm. His major league baseball career started when he signed with the Cleveland Indians in 1936. Feller played in 14 games with the Indians that year, bypassing the usual minor league training. In 1937, he pitched in 26 games and had a 3.39 ERA.

Feller led the American League in wins and strikeouts in 1939, ending the season with a 24-9 record and 246 strikeouts to 142 walks. The following year, he won the American League Triple Crown, pitching in 43 games with a 27-11 record, 261 strikeouts to 118 walks, and an ERA of 2.61. In 1941, Feller again led the American League in wins with 25 and in strikeouts with 260.

Feller's professional baseball career was interrupted for World War II from 1942-1944, during which time he served in a combat unit. When he returned to the Indians in 1946, he picked up where he left off, once again leading the American League in wins and strikeouts. He repeated that feat one more time in 1947. He led the league in strikeouts for the last time in 1948, striking out 164 batters that season. In 1951, he led the American League in wins with a 22-8 record. Feller pitched in 19 games and had a 4.97 ERA in 1956, his last season in the major leagues.

Statistics for Feller in 18 seasons (1936-1941, 1945-1956) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 27 in 1940
  • 5 seasons with over 200 strikeouts, with a high of 348 in 1946
  • 5 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.18 in 1946

Career statistics for Feller include:

  • 570 games played
  • 3,827.0 innings pitched
  • 266-162 win-loss record
  • 2,581 strikeouts to 1,764 walks
  • 3.25 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bob Feller
ESPN Sports - Bob Feller


Elmer Flick (1963)

Elmer Flick started his major league career in 1898 with the Philadelphia Phillies, playing in 134 games that season and batting .302 with 137 hits, 16 doubles, 13 triples, and 23 stolen bases. In 1902, he moved to the Philadelphia Athletics but he only played in 11 games with them before being traded to the Cleveland Bronchos.

After several good years with the Bronchos/Naps/Indians, Flick developed stomach issues that limited his playing time from 1908 through 1910. He played in a total of only 99 games during those three years. Prior to retiring completely from baseball, Flick played in the minor leagues in 1911 and 1912.

In 1905, Flick won the American League batting title. Earlier in his career (1900), he led the National League in RBIs. In both 1904 and 1906, he led the American League in stolen bases.

Statistics for Flick in 10 seasons (1898-1907) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 200 in 1900
  • 4 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 34 in 1906
  • 10 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 22 in 1906
  • 10 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 41 in 1907
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .367 in 1900

Career statistics for Flick include:

  • 1,483 games played
  • 1,752 hits
  • 268 doubles
  • 164 triples
  • 330 stolen bases
  • .313 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Elmer Flick
ESPN - Elmer Flick


Stan Coveleski (1969)

Stan Coveleski had a hard life as a child, working 72 hours a week in the Pennsylvania coal mines when he was just twelve years old. Six years later, in 1907, he started playing baseball with a local team. In 1909, he signed with a minor league team and in 1912, he made his first appearance in the major leagues, pitching for the Philadelphia Athletics. However, he was released after just five games and it wasn't until 1916 that Coveleski once again had a chance to pitch in the major leagues.

In 1916, Coveleski was signed by the Cleveland Indians and he became a member of their starting rotation. That season he pitched in 45 games and had a 15-13 record with 76 strikeouts to 58 walks and a 3.41 ERA. Four years later, in 1920, he led the American League in strikeouts with 133.

Covelski had a good 1923 season, leading the American League in ERA with 2.76. The following season he had a 4.04 ERA and the Indians traded him after the 1924 season to the Washington Senators. He had a good start with the Senators, ending the 1925 season with a 20-5 record and a 2.84 ERA. Two seasons later, however, Covelski was sidelined with arm problems for most of the season and he played in just five games in 1927. He finished out his major league career pitching in twelve games in 1928 for the New York Yankees.

Statistics for Covelski in 13 seasons (1916-1928) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 24 in 1919 and 1920
  • 6 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with lows of 1.81 in 1917 and 1.82 in 1918

Career statistics for Covelski include:

  • 450 games played
  • 3,082.0 innings pitched
  • 215-142 win-loss record
  • 981 strikeouts to 802 walks
  • 2.89 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Stan Coveleski
ESPN Sports - Stan Coveleski


Lou Boudreau (1970)

Lou Boudreau signed with the Cleveland Indians while he was still in college. In 1938, he played first base in one game with them. The following season, he became a shortstop and played in 53 games with the Indians. In 1940, his first full season in the major leagues, Boudreau batted .295 with 185 hits, 46 doubles, 10 triples, and 101 RBIs in 155 games.

In 1942, at the age of 25, Boudreau was made player-manager of the Indians, a position he held through the 1950 season. Boudreau led the American League in doubles three times (1941, 1944, 1947). In 1944, he won the American League batting title, batting .327 that season. His best season, however, was 1948, when he won the American League MVP award. That season, Boudreau batted .355 with 199 hits, 34 doubles, 18 home runs, and 106 RBIs in 152 games.

Boudreau was released by the Indians after the 1950 season and he signed with the Boston Red Sox. In 1952, the Red Sox named him player-manager but he played in just four games with them that season, his last in the major leagues.

After retiring as a major league player, Boudreau continued to manage the Red Sox through the 1953 and 1954 seasons. From 1955 until he was fired in 1957, he managed the Kansas City Athletics. He ended his major league managing career in 1960 with the Chicago Cubs. His record as a manager was 1,162 wins to 1,224 losses in 2,404 games. He led the 1948 Cleveland Indians to a pennant and World Series win.

After his career as a player-manager ended, Boudreau had a long career as a radio broadcaster for the Chicago Cubs (1958-1959, 1961-1987).

Statistics for Boudreau in 15 seasons (1938-1952) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 199 in 1948
  • 7 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 46 in 1940
  • 4 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .355 in 1948

Career statistics for Boudreau include:

  • 1,646 games played
  • 1,779 hits
  • 385 doubles
  • .295 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Lou Boudreau
ESPN Sports - Lou Boudreau
Baseball Reference.com - Lou Boudreau


Early Wynn (1972)

Early Wynn, the Hall of Famer with a great name for a winning pitcher, had a very long major league career, pitching for three teams through 23 seasons and four decades (1939-1963). He signed with the Washington Senators in 1937 and he made his first major league appearance in 1939, playing in just three games. The next year, he pitched in five games and in 1942, he finally had a full season, pitching in 30 games. That season he had a 10-16 record and a 5.12 ERA. Wynn had a much better season in 1943, ending with an 18-12 record and a 2.91 ERA.

In December, 1948, Wynn was traded to the Cleveland Indians. He didn't play well in 1949, ending with a 4.15 ERA but in his second year with the Indians, he had a better season. In 1950, Wynn led the American League in ERA with 3.20 and he ended the season with an 18-8 record. Four years later, in 1954, he led the American League in wins with 23.

Wynn had his best seasons in the late 1950s, near the end of his major league career. In 1957 and 1958, he led the American League in strikeouts. Wynn went to the Chicago White Sox in 1958 and he had his best season a year later. In 1959, Wynn led the American League in wins and he won the American League Cy Young award. That season Wynn had a 22-10 record and a 3.17 ERA.

Wynn returned to the Indians for his final season in 1963. He ended his major league pitching career with a 2.28 ERA in 20 games that year.

In 1964, Wynn became the pitching coach for the Cleveland Indians. He spent a year as a manager in the minor leagues in 1972. From 1977 through 1980, Wynn worked as a radio commentator for the Toronto Blue Jays.

Statistics for Wynn in 21 full seasons (1942-1944,1946-1963) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 23 in 1952 and 1954
  • 7 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 184 in 1957
  • 6 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.28 in 1963

Career statistics for Wynn include:

  • 691 games played
  • 4,564.0 innings pitched
  • 300-244 win-loss record
  • 2,334 strikeouts to 1,775 walks
  • 3.54 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Early Wynn
ESPN Sports - Early Wynn


Earl Averill (1975)

Earl Averill started his major league baseball career with the Cleveland Indians in 1929 at the age of 27. In his first at bat in the major leagues, he hit a home run. That season, he batted .332 with 198 hits, 43 doubles, 13 triples, 18 home runs, and 96 RBIs in 151 games.

In 1936, Averill led the American League in hits with 232. Less than three years later, during the 1939 season, the Indians traded him to the Detroit Tigers. The following season, Averill played in only 64 games with the Tigers. He ended his career in 1941, playing in just eight games with the Boston Braves.

Statistics for Averill in 12 seasons (1929-1940) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 232 in 1936
  • 9 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 48 in 1934
  • 8 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 16 in 1933
  • 5 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 32 in 1931 and 1932
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 143 in 1931
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .378 in 1936

Career statistics for Averill include:

  • 1,668 games played
  • 2,019 hits
  • 401 doubles
  • 128 triples
  • 238 home runs
  • 1,164 RBIs
  • .318 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Earl Averill
ESPN Sports - Earl Averill


Bob Lemon (1976)

Bob Lemon was a star baseball player in high school but not as a pitcher. He started his career as a shortstop and didn't start pitching until 1946, seven years after he signed his first major league contract. In 1937, Lemon, while still in high school, signed with the Cleveland Indians. He played in the minor leagues until 1941 when he joined the Indians in September for five games as a third baseman. The following season, he again played in just five games with the Indians.

Lemon joined the US Navy in 1943 and he did not return to the Indians until the end of World War II. In 1946, his first season back in the major leagues, Lemon started as a center fielder but he was moved to the bullpen, pitching in 32 games with the Indians. That season he had a 4-5 record with 39 strikeouts to 68 walks and a 2.49 ERA.

In 1948, Lemon's first full season in the starting rotation for Cleveland, he had a 20-14 record with 147 strikeouts to 129 walks and a 2.82 ERA. He had a no hitter on June 30th of that season and he won the American League Pitcher of the Year award.

Although Lemon was an outstanding pitcher, he walked almost as many batters as he struck out. In his 13 seasons as a pitcher, he struck out 1,277 batters and gave up 1,251 walks. Surprisingly, even with his less than stellar strikeout record, Lemon led the American League in strikeouts in 1950. He also led the league in wins that season and again in 1954 and 1955. In both 1950 and 1954, Lemon had more wins than any other pitcher in major league baseball.

Lemon retired as a major league pitcher after the 1958 season. He then became a pitching coach until 1979, coaching for the Cleveland Indians, Philadelphia Phillies, California Angels, Kansas City Royals, and the New York Yankees. During those years, he also coached and managed in the minor leagues.

Lemon's first major league managerial position came during the 1970 season when the Kansas City Royals promoted him. In 1971, he led the Royals to their first winning season since their establishment as a franchise in 1969. That effort and success earned Lemon the American League Manager of the Year award. He remained manager of the Royals through the 1972 season.

In 1973, Lemon went back to coaching until 1977, when he became the manager of the Chicago White Sox. Although he was successful that season, and won his second American League Manager of the Year award, he was fired by the White Sox owner midway through the 1978 season.

Shortly after leaving the White Sox in 1978, Lemon was hired to manage the New York Yankees. Under his leadership in 1978, the Yankees won the American League pennant race. The following season, the Yankees faltered in the first half of the season and Lemon was fired. He came back, however, in 1981 to lead the Yankees to the World Series. They lost the series and shortly after the start of the 1982 season, Lemon was again fired. At that point, he retired permanently from major league baseball. As a manager in 833 games in the major leagues, Lemon had 430 wins to 403 losses.

Statistics for Lemon as a pitcher in 13 seasons (1946-1958) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 23 in 1950 and 1954
  • 5 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with lows of 2.49 in 1946 and 2.50 in 1952

Career statistics for Lemon include:

  • 460 games played
  • 2,850.0 innings pitched
  • 207-128 win-loss record
  • 1,277 strikeouts to 1,251 walks
  • 3.23 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bob Lemon
ESPN Sports - Bob Lemon


Joe Sewell (1977)

Joe Sewell came from a baseball family, with two brothers and a cousin who played in the major leagues. He started his major league career in 1920 with the Cleveland Indians, playing in 22 games with the team that season. In 1921, Sewell became the regular shortstop for the Indians. That season he batted .318 with 182 hits, 36 doubles, 12 triples, and 93 RBIs in 154 games.

Sewell excelled as an "unstrikable" batter - he had the lowest strikeout rate in the major leagues with approximately one strikeout for every 63 at-bats. In 1932, he struck out only three times that entire season, the lowest season strikeout record in major league baseball history. Sewell still holds the record for the lowest career strikeout rate in major league baseball. He once played 115 consecutive games without striking out even once.

Statistics for Sewell in 13 full seasons (1921-1933) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 204 in 1925
  • 8 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 48 in 1927
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .353 in 1923

Career statistics for Sewell include:

  • 1,903 games played
  • 2,226 hits
  • 436 doubles
  • 114 strikeouts and 842 walks
  • .312 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe Sewell
ESPN Sports - Joe Sewell


Addie Joss (1978)

Addie Joss played baseball in college and then advanced to semi-pro baseball. In March, 1902, he signed with the Cleveland Bronchos/Naps/Indians, pitching in 32 games that season with a 17-13 record, 106 strikeouts to 75 walks, and a 2.77 ERA.

Joss led the American League in shutouts in 1902, ERA in 1904 and 1908, and in wins in 1907. He had two no hitters in his career and he pitched a perfect game on October 2, 1908. That was probably his best season, with an ERA of 1.16, a 24-11 record, and 130 strikeouts to 30 walks in 325.0 innings pitched.

Joss suffered an injury in 1910 and he played in just 13 games that year. It turned out to be his last season because he died tragically from meningitis in 1911 at the age of just 31. At the end of his career, Joss had the second lowest career ERA in major league baseball history.

Statistics for Joss in 9 seasons (1902-1910) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 27 in 1907
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.16 in 1908

Career statistics for Joss include:

  • 286 games played
  • 2,327.0 innings pitched
  • 160-97 win-loss record
  • 920 strikeouts to 364 walks
  • 1.89 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Addie Joss
ESPN Sports - Addie Joss


Larry Doby (1998)

Larry Doby was a star athlete in high school, playing baseball, basketball, and football. In the summers, he played semi-pro baseball. He started playing professional baseball with the Negro Leagues in 1942. After two seasons, he joined the US Navy in 1943 and served through 1946.

In 1947, Bill Veeck, owner of the Cleveland Indians bought Doby's contract and Doby became the first African-American player in the American League and the second, after Jackie Robinson, in major league baseball. One year after being signed by the Cleveland Indians, Doby was playing full-time as an outfielder for the team. In his first full season in the major leagues, Doby batted .301 with 132 hits, 23 doubles, 9 triples, and 14 home runs in 121 games.

Doby led the American League in home runs in 1952 and 1954. He also led the league in RBIs in 1954. Although he had a good season in 1954, the Indians traded Doby to the Chicago White Sox in October, 1955. After two seasons in Chicago, the White Sox traded him to the Baltimore Orioles. However, Doby never played with the Orioles because they traded him back to the Indians on April 1, 1958.

Doby played in just 89 games in 1958, batting .283 with 70 hits and 13 home runs. In March of 1959, the Indians traded him to the Detroit Tigers and Doby became the first African-American player for Detroit. After just 18 games with the Tigers, they traded Doby back to the White Sox and he ended his career in 1959 with 21 games with Chicago.

Doby retired as a major league player prior to the 1960 season. Nine years later, he returned to the major leagues as a scout and minor league instructor with the Montreal Expos. From 1971 through 1973, Doby was the batting coach for the Expos. In 1974, he returned to the Indians as a coach but two years later, he was back coaching with the Expos.

In 1977, Doby returned to the White Sox, this time as their batting coach. At the end of June, 1978, Doby finally had the chance to manage. He spent the rest of the season as manager of the White Sox, ending his only season as a major league manager with a 37-50 record. The following season, Doby returned to coaching with the White Sox for one season.

Statistics for Doby in 13 seasons (1947-1959) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 164 in 1950
  • 8 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 32 in 1952 and 1954
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 126 in 1954
  • 2 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .326 in 1950

Career statistics for Doby include:

  • 1,533 games played
  • 1,515 hits
  • 243 doubles
  • 253 home runs
  • 970 RBIs
  • .283 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Larry Doby
ESPN Sports - Larry Doby