Baltimore Orioles - Baseball Hall of Fame

George Sisler (1939)

In 1911, George Sisler signed a minor league contract and he played in the minors until he was signed in 1915 by the St. Louis Browns (modern day Baltimore Orioles). He pitched part of the time in 1915 but became a full-time first baseman the following season. As a pitcher in 1915, Sisler pitched 70.0 innings, with a 4-4 record, 41 strikeouts to 38 walks, and a 2.83 ERA. He batted in 81 games that season with a .285 batting average, 78 hits, 10 doubles, 29 RBIs, and 10 stolen bases.

Sisler suffered from vision problems in 1923 and he didn't play at all that season. The following season he was made player-manager of the Browns, a position he held through the 1926 season. He played one more season with the Browns before his contract was sold to the Washington Senators prior to the 1928 season. After just a month with the Senators, they sold his contract to the Boston Braves in May, 1928. Sisler retired as a major league player after the 1930 season.

Sisler won the American League batting title twice, first in 1920 and then again two years later. In 1922, he also won the American League MVP award, leading the league in hits and stolen bases that season. Sisler also led the league in hits in 1920 and in stolen bases in 1918, 1921, and 1927.

After ending his major league career, Sisler played in the minor leagues. Later, he became a scout and front-office aide to Branch Rickey, working with Rickey at various times with the Cardinals, the Dodgers, and the Pirates.

Statistics for Sisler in 15 seasons (1915-1922, 1924-1930) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with over150 hits, with a high of 257 in 1920
  • 7 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 49 in 1920
  • 8 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 18 in 1920, 1921, and 1922
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 122 in 1920
  • 8 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 51 in 1922
  • 13 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .420 in 1922

Career statistics for Sisler include:

  • 2,055 games played
  • 2,812 hits
  • 425 doubles
  • 164 triples
  • 1,175 RBIs
  • 375 stolen bases
  • .340 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - George Sisler
ESPN Sports - George Sisler


Bobby Wallace (1953)

Bobby Wallace started his major league career in 1894 with the Cleveland Spiders of the National League. He stayed with the team until 1899, the team's last season. Wallace had a fairly inconsistent career with the Spiders, first playing as a pitcher, then in the outfield, and moved again in 1897 to third base. In his first three seasons with them, he played in just 56 games.

During the 1899 season, Wallace moved to the St. Louis Perfectos/Cardinals, playing with them through the 1901 season. In 1902, Wallace joined the St. Louis Browns (modern day Baltimore Orioles) and he finally found some stability, playing for the Browns from 1902 through 1916. He was a regular player with the Browns through 1912, but he played in just 104 games over his last four seasons (1913-1916) with them. In 1911, he was named player-manager of the team and he stayed in that position for two seasons.

In 1917, Wallace returned to the St. Louis Cardinals, playing in just eight games in 1917 and 32 games in 1918, his last season as a major league player. In 1917, in addition to playing with the Cardinals, Wallace managed a minor league team. In 1937, Wallace made a brief comeback in the major leagues as manager of the Cincinnati Reds.

Wallace played in over 100 games in each of 16 seasons (1897-1912). His statistics during that time include:

  • 5 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 178 in 1901
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 34 in 1901
  • 4 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 21 in 1897

Career statistics for Wallace include:

  • 2,383 games played
  • 2,309 hits
  • 391 doubles
  • 143 triples
  • 1,121 RBIs
  • 201 stolen bases
  • .268 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bobby Wallace
ESPN Sports - Bobby Wallace


Frank Robinson (1982)

Frank Robinson had a long and successful career in baseball, playing for five teams over 21 years. In addition to his career as a major league baseball player, Robinson managed major league baseball teams for 16 years. With his years as a player, player- manager and manager, Robinson was an important figure in major league baseball for over a 40-year time span.

Robinson began his career as a player in 1956 with the Cincinnati Reds. He won the National League Rookie of the Year award that season, batting .290 with 166 hits, 27 doubles, 38 home runs, and 83 RBIs in 152 games. Two seasons later, Robinson won his only Gold Glove award.

In 1961, Robinson won the National League MVP award. That season he batted .323 with 176 hits, 32 doubles, 37 home runs, 124 RBIs, and 22 stolen bases in 153 games. The following season was an even better one for Robinson. In 1962, he had career highs in hits (208), doubles (51), RBIs (136), and batting average (.342).

After the 1965 season, in which Robinson batted .296, hit 33 home runs and had 113 RBIs, the Cincinnati Reds, much to the dismay of the fans, traded Robinson to the Baltimore Orioles. In his first season with the Orioles, Robinson won the American League MVP award, becoming the first major league player to win an MVP award in both leagues. He also won the American League Triple Crown that season, batting .316 with 182 hits, 34 doubles, 49 home runs, and 122 RBIs. In the 1966 post-season, Robinson helped the Baltimore Orioles win their first World Series and he won the World Series MVP award for his efforts. Robinson's last major award as a player came five years later, in 1971, when he won the All Star Game MVP award.

In 1972, Robinson left the Orioles and played for the Los Angeles Dodgers for a year. He followed that season with a move to the California Angels, where he played for one and a half seasons before being traded to the Cleveland Indians during the 1974 season. In 1975, Robinson became player-manager for the Indians and he continued as manager for a year after ending his career as a player in 1976.

Robinson, as manager of the Indians from 1975-1977 made baseball history as the first African-American manager in the major leagues. After ending his time as manager of the Cleveland team, he coached in the major leagues, first for the California Angels and then for his former team, the Orioles.

In 1981, he was hired as manager of the San Francisco Giants and he stayed with them for four years. After leaving the Giants in 1984, Robinson again took a position as a coach, this time with the Milwaukee Brewers. A year later, returned again to the Orioles as a coach.

Robinson's next managerial position was with the Orioles from 1988-1991. In 1989, he won the American League Manager of the Year award for leading the Orioles to a second place finish in the American League East division. After leaving the Orioles in 1991, Robinson didn't coach or manage in the major leagues again until 2002 when he was hired to manage the Montreal Expos. He had his longest managerial stint with the Expos/Washington Nationals, staying in that position for five years. In his 16 years as a manager, Robinson had seven seasons with a .500 or better win percentage and a career managerial record of 1,065 wins to 1,176 losses in 2,241 games.

Statistics for Robinson in 21 seasons (1956-1976) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 208 in 1962
  • 7 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 51 in 1962
  • 17 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 49 in 1966
  • 6 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with a high of 136 in 1962
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .342 in 1962

Career statistics for Robinson include:

  • 2,808 games played
  • 2,943 hits
  • 528 doubles
  • 586 home runs
  • 1,812 RBIs
  • 204 stolen bases
  • .294 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Frank Robinson
ESPN - Frank Robinson


Brooks Robinson (1983)

Brooks Robinson was an outstanding offensive and defensive third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles for twenty-three years. He was drafted by the Orioles in 1955 but he spent most of the first three seasons in the minor leagues, playing in just 71 games with the Orioles from 1955 through 1957. In 1958, he played the full season (145 games) with the Orioles but his performance was not up to major league standards so he was sent back to the minor leagues for part of the 1959 season, playing with the Orioles in just 88 games that season.

In 1964, Robinson won the American League MVP award. That season he batted .317 with 194 hits, 35 doubles, 28 home runs, and 118 RBIs in 163 games. Two years later, in 1966, Robinson won the All Star Game MVP award. He won his last major league MVP award in 1970 when he was named the World Series MVP.

Robinson's outstanding defensive plays earned him 16 consecutive Gold Glove awards (1960-1975). His career fielding statistics at third base include:

  • 2,870 games played
  • 263 errors
  • 6,205 assists
  • 618 double plays
  • 2,697 putouts
  • .971 fielding percentage

After retiring from major league baseball as a player, Robinson became a color commentator for the Baltimore Orioles television broadcasts.

Batting statistics for Robinson in 23 seasons (1955-1977) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 194 in 1964
  • 5 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 38 in 1961
  • 6 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 28 in 1964

Career batting statistics for Robinson include:

  • 2,896 games played
  • 2,848 hits
  • 482 doubles
  • 268 home runs
  • 1,357 RBIs
  • .267 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Brooks Robinson
ESPN Sports - Brooks Robinson
Baseball Reference.com - Brooks Robinson


Jim Palmer (1990)

Jim Palmer was a power pitcher for nineteen years with the Baltimore Orioles. He was signed by the Orioles to a minor league contract in 1962, fresh out of high school. After spending the 1964 season in the minor leagues, Palmer joined the Orioles in 1965, pitching in 27 games as a relief pitcher. In 1966, he became part of their starting rotation. That season he pitched in 30 games and had a 15-10 record with 147 strikeouts to 91 walks and a 3.46 ERA. The following two years, 1967 and 1968, were difficult years for Palmer, as he struggled with arm problems. He came back strong in 1969, pitching in 26 games and ending the season with an ERA of 2.34. On August 13th of that year, Palmer pitched a no hitter.

In 1972, Palmer had a career low ERA of 2.07. The next year, he won the American League Cy Young award and he led the league in ERA. That season he pitched in 38 games with a 22-9 record and a 2.40 ERA. Two years later, in 1975, Palmer again won the Cy Young award and he led the American League in ERA with 2.09 and in wins with 23. He repeated his outstanding pitching feats in 1976 and again won the American League Cy Young award, leading the league one more time in wins with 22.

In addition to being a star pitcher, Palmer was an excellent fielder and he won four consecutive Gold Gloves (1976-1979). In 1976, he made just one error in 40 games and the next year he matched that by making no errors in 23 games. Career fielding statistics for Palmer include:

  • 558 games played
  • 34 errors
  • 577 assists
  • 292 putouts
  • .952 fielding percentage

In 1984, Palmer was released by the Orioles after pitching in fourteen games in 1983 and just five games in 1984. He retired after the season ended. He tried a brief comeback during Spring training of 1991, but after failing to pitch well, he retired for good.

After retiring from major league baseball as a pitcher, Palmer became a popular broadcaster. He worked for ABC from 1985 to 1989 and again in 1994 and 1995. Today he is a broadcaster for the Orioles.

Pitching statistics for Palmer in 19 seasons (1965-1967, 1969-1984) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 23 wins in 1975
  • 7 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 199 in 1970
  • 10 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.07 in 1972

Career pitching statistics for Palmer include:

  • 558 games played
  • 3,948.0 innings pitched
  • 268-152 win-loss record
  • 2,212 strikeouts to 1,311 walks
  • 2.85 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jim Palmer
ESPN Sports - Jim Palmer
Baseball Reference.com - Jim Palmer


Eddie Murray (2003)

Eddie Murray played organized baseball as a child, first on little league teams and later in high school. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 1973 and played on their minor league teams through 1976. In 1977, his first season in the major leagues, Murray won the American League Rookie of the Year award. That season he batted .283 with 173 hits, 29 doubles, 27 home runs, and 88 RBIs in 160 games.

Murray was an excellent fielder, playing at first base for most of his career. In 1982, he won his first of three consecutive Gold Gloves, making just four errors that year. He had 97 assists, 106 defensive double plays, 1,269 putouts, and a .997 fielding percentage. Career fielding statistics for Murray at first base include:

  • 2,413 games played
  • 167 errors
  • 1,865 assists
  • 2,033 double plays
  • 21,255 putouts
  • .993 fielding percentage

In 1983, Murray won the first of three Silver Slugger awards. That season he batted .306 with 178 hits, 30 doubles, 33 home runs, and 111 RBIs. The next season his numbers were almost the same and he won a second Silver Slugger award.

Although he played well for the Orioles, Murray was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers in December, 1988. He earned his third Silver Slugger award in 1990, his second season with the Dodgers. That season he had a career high batting average of .330.

Murray played for three full seasons with the Dodgers and then signed with the New York Mets prior to the 1992 season. After two full seasons with the Mets, Murray moved to the Cleveland Indians for the 1994 and 1995 seasons. His last two years in the major leagues were split between the Indians and a return to the Orioles in 1996 and a stint with the Anaheim Angels, followed by a return to the Dodgers to end his career in 1997. Murray's last year was his only partial season (55 games).

Batting statistics for Murray in 20 full seasons (1977-1996) in the major leagues include:

  • 14 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 186 in 1980
  • 7 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 37 in 1985 and 1992
  • 16 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 33 in 1983
  • 6 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with a high of 124 in 1985
  • 7 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .330 in 1990

Career batting statistics for Murray include:

  • 3,026 games played
  • 3,255 hits
  • 560 doubles
  • 504 home runs
  • 1,917 RBIs
  • .287 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Eddie Murray
ESPN Sports - Eddie Murray
Baseball Reference.com - Eddie Murray


Cal Ripken, Jr. (2007)

Cal Ripken, Jr. came from a baseball family, with a father who was a major league coach and manager and a brother who also played in the major leagues. At one point in his career, Ripken played with his brother for the Baltimore Orioles and their father was the Orioles manager.

Ripken was drafted by the Orioles in 1978 and he played on their minor league teams from 1978 to 1981. He made his first start with the Orioles in 1981, playing in 23 games with them that season. The following year he was named American League Rookie of the Year. In 1982, Ripken batted .264 with 158 hits, 32 doubles, 28 home runs, and 93 RBIs in 160 games.

In 1983, Ripken won the American League MVP award and the first of eight Silver Slugger awards. That season he batted .318 with 211 hits, 47 doubles, 27 home runs, and 102 RBIs in 162 games. He won four more Silver Slugger awards in the following six years (1984-1986, 1989).

Ripken won his second MVP award in 1991. That season he also won another Silver Slugger award, the All Star Game MVP award, and a Gold Glove. He batted .323 with 210 hits, 46 doubles, 34 home runs, and 114 RBIs in 162 games in 1991.

An excellent defensive player at shortstop, Ripken won two Gold Glove awards (1991, 1992). His career fielding statistics at shortstop include:

  • 2,302 games played
  • 225 errors
  • 6,977 assists
  • 1,565 double plays
  • 3,651 putouts
  • .979 fielding percentage

In 1993 and 1994, Ripken won his last two Silver Slugger awards. He won a second All Star Game MVP award in 2001, his last season in the major leagues.

Major league records Ripken holds include:

  • most consecutive games played (2,632)
  • most consecutive innings played (8,243)
  • most home runs by a shortstop (345)
  • most double plays by an American League shortstop (1,682)

Batting statistics for Ripken in 21 seasons (1981-2001) in the major leagues include:

  • 15 seasons with 150 or more hits, with highs of 211 in 1983 and 210 in 1991
  • 10 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with highs of 47 in 1983 and 46 in 1991
  • 12 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 34 in 1991
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .340 in 1999 in 86 games

Career batting statistics for Ripken include:

  • 3,001 games played
  • 3,184 hits
  • 603 doubles
  • 431 home runs
  • 1,695 RBIs
  • .276 batting average

Source for Information
Wikipedia - Cal Ripken, Jr.
ESPN Sports - Cal Ripken, Jr.
Baseball Reference.com - Cal Ripken, Jr.