Philadelphia Phillies - Baseball Hall of Fame

Grover Alexander (1938)

Grover Alexander, also known as Pete Alexander or by his nickname of Old Pete, was a pitcher with the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Cardinals. In 1907, he signed his first contract to play professional baseball in the minor leagues. Four years later, his contract was sold to the Phillies. In 1911, his rookie year with the Phillies, Alexander played in 48 games, pitched 367.0 innings, and had a 28-13 record with a 2.57 ERA.

While with the Phillies, Alexander led the National League in strikeouts five times (1912, 1914-1917). He also led the league in ERA three times (1915-1917) and wins four times (1914-1917).

After the 1917 season, the Phillies sold Alexander's contract to the Chicago Cubs. He played in only three games the following season, spending the rest of the season in the US Army. Alexander returned from World War I with injuries and alcohol problems but he still managed to lead the National League in ERA in 1919 and in wins, ERA, and strikeouts in 1920.

During the 1926 season, the Cubs sold Alexander's contract to the St. Louis Cardinals. He stayed with the Cardinals through the 1929 season and then played his final nine games in the major leagues with the Phillies in 1930.

After retiring as a major league player, Alexander was the player-coach for a team named for him, the Grover Cleveland Alexander House of David team.

Statistics for Alexander in 18 seasons (1911-1917, 1919-1929) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 33 in 1916
  • 8 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 241 in 1915
  • 10 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.22 in 1915

Career statistics for Alexander include:

  • 696 games played
  • 5,190.0 innings pitched
  • 373-208 win-loss record
  • 2,198 strikeouts to 951 walks
  • 2.56 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Grover Alexander
ESPN Sports - Grover Alexander


Ed Delahanty (1945)

Ed Delahanty came from a baseball family, with four brothers who also played in the major leagues. He started his own professional career in 1887 in the minor leagues. A year later, he made his first major league start with the Philadelphia Quakers/Phillies, playing in 74 games with them. After playing in just 56 games in 1889, Delahanty moved the next year to the Cleveland Infants of the Players League. When that league folded after the 1890 season, Delahanty returned to the Phillies and stayed with them through the 1901 season.

During his time with the Phillies, Delahanty led the National League in home runs twice (1893, 1896) and RBIs three times (1893, 1896, 1899). He also led the league in stolen bases in 1898 and in batting average in 1899.

In 1902, Delahanty moved to the American League and the Washington Senators for his last two years in the major leagues. That season he led the league in batting average.

Delahanty died tragically in 1903 at the age of 35 when he was swept over Niagara Falls. It is unclear how the accident happened or if it was a suicide.

Statistics for Delahanty in 13 seasons (1890-1902) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 238 in 1899
  • 11 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 55 in 1899
  • 10 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 21 in 1892
  • 7 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 146 in 1893
  • 11 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 58 in 1898
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .410 in 1899

Career statistics for Delahanty include:

  • 1,835 games played
  • 2,596 hits
  • 522 doubles
  • 185 triples
  • 1,464 RBIs
  • 455 stolen bases
  • .346 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ed Delahanty
ESPN Sports - Ed Delahanty


Billy Hamilton (1961)

Billy Hamilton started his major league career in 1888 with the Kansas City Cowboys of the American Association. In 1889, he led the league in stolen bases. At the end of that season, when the Kansas City team folded, Hamilton's contract was sold to the Philadelphia Phillies.

Hamilton stayed with the Phillies through the 1895 season. In his six years with the Phillies, he won the National League batting title twice (1891, 1893) and the MLB batting title once (1893). He led the National League in hits in 1891. Hamilton was known for his speed and he led the league in stolen bases four times (1890, 1891, 1894, 1895).

In 1896, Hamilton moved to the Boston Beaneaters/Braves. He continued playing with the Beaneaters through the 1901 season.

Statistics for Hamilton in 13 seasons (1889-1901) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 220 in 1894
  • 9 seasons with over 50 stolen bases, with a high of 111 in 1889 and 1891
  • 12 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .404 in 1894

Career statistics for Hamilton include:

  • 1,591 games played
  • 2,158 hits
  • 242 doubles
  • 912 stolen bases
  • .344 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Billy Hamilton
ESPN Sports - Billy Hamilton


Dave Bancroft (1971)

Dave Bancroft started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1909 at the age of 18. It took six years of minor league playing before he made it to the major leagues, starting in 1915 with the Philadelphia Phillies. In his first year, Bancroft batted .254 with 143 hits, 18 doubles, 7 home runs, and 15 stolen bases in 153 games.

In June, 1920, after a little over five years with the Phillies, Bancroft was traded to the New York Giants. He had the best season of his career in 1922 when he batted .321 with 209 hits and 41 doubles in 156 games. However, a year later, after the 1923 season, the Giants traded Bancroft to the Boston Braves.

Bancroft became player-manager in Boston and he remained in that position from 1924 through 1927. His record as a manager was 249 wins to 363 losses. After the 1927 season, Bancroft signed with the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers, agreeing to a player only role. He stayed with the Robins for two seasons and then returned to the Giants to end his career with just 10 games in 1930. That season he also served as assistant manager and coach for the Giants.

After his major league playing career ended, Bancroft worked as a coach for the Giants in 1931. Two years later, he moved to a managerial position in the minor leagues and he continued to manage teams through the 1950 season.

Statistics for Bancroft in 15 seasons (1915-1929) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 209 in 1922
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 41 in 1922
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .321 in 1922

Career statistics for Bancroft include:

  • 1,913 games played
  • 2,004 hits
  • 320 doubles
  • .279 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Dave Bancroft
ESPN Sports - Dave Bancroft


Sam Thompson (1974)

Sam Thompson started his major league baseball career in 1885 with the Detroit Wolverines of the National League. Two years later, Thompson led the National League in batting and RBIs. When the Wolverines folded after the 1888 season, the Philadelphia Quakers/Phillies bought Thompson's contract.

Thompson led the National League in home runs in 1889 and in home runs and RBIs in 1895. During his career, he led the league in hits three times and in doubles twice.

Thompson developed back problems in 1897 and he played in just three games that season and in fourteen games the following year. He retired after the 1898 season but he went back to Detroit to play in eight games with the Detroit Tigers in 1906.

Thompson played in over 99 games in each of 10 seasons (1886-1887, 1889-1896). His statistics during that time include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 222 in 1893
  • 4 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 45 in 1895
  • 7 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 27 in 1894
  • 8 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with highs of 166 in 1887 and 165 in 1895
  • 8 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 29 in 1891
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .407 in 1894

Career statistics for Thompson include:

  • 1,407 games played
  • 1,979 hits
  • 340 doubles
  • 160 triples
  • 1,299 RBIs
  • 229 stolen bases
  • .331 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Sam Thompson
ESPN Sports - Sam Thompson


Robin Roberts (1976)

Prior to being drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in the late 1940s, Robin Roberts was a basketball player and baseball pitcher at Michigan State University. After starting with the Phillies in 1948, he continued playing basketball in the off-season with the Robin Roberts All-Stars. In his first season with the Phillies, Roberts pitched 146.2 innings and had a 7-9 record and a 3.19 ERA in 20 games.

In 1952, Roberts led the National League in wins with 28. The following season he led the league in wins again and in strikeouts. That season he had a 23-16 record with 198 strikeouts to 61 walks in 44 games. In 1954, Roberts repeated his achievements of the preceding year, once more leading the National League in wins with 23 and in strikeouts with 185. He led the league for a final time in wins in 1955 with a 23-14 record.

After 14 years with the Phillies (1948-1961), Roberts' contract was sold to the New York Yankees, but he never played for them. The Yankees released him in May, 1962 and Roberts then signed with the Baltimore Orioles. He pitched for the Orioles for three seasons before moving to the Houston Astros for two years. Roberts finished his major league pitching career in 1966 with the Chicago Cubs.

After retiring as a major league pitcher, Roberts pitched in the minor leagues in 1967. Ten years later, Roberts became a coach for the University of South Florida's baseball team. He held that position from 1977 through 1985.

Statistics for Roberts in 19 seasons (1948-1966) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 28 wins in 1952
  • 4 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 198 in 1953
  • 6 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.59 in 1952

Career statistics for Roberts include:

  • 676 games played
  • 4,688.2 innings pitched
  • 286-245 win-loss record
  • 2,357 strikeouts to 902 walks
  • 3.41 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Robin Roberts
ESPN Sports - Robin Roberts


Chuck Klein (1980)

Chuck Klein started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1927 with the St. Louis Cardinals organization. In 1928, the Philadelphia Phillies bought his contract and he played in 64 games with them that season. He batted .360 with 91 hits, 14 doubles, and 11 home runs. The following season he led the National League in home runs with 43. In 1929, his first full season in the major leagues, Klein batted .356 with 219 hits, 45 doubles, and 145 RBIs in 149 games.

In 1930, Klein led the National League in doubles with 59. A year later, he led the league in home runs with 31 and in RBIs with 121. The next two seasons were his best ones and he led the league in home runs and hits both years. In 1932, Klein won the National League MVP award for batting .348 with 226 hits, 50 doubles, 15 triples, 38 home runs, and 137 RBIs in 154 games. The following year Klein won the National League Triple Crown and he led the league in hits with 223, doubles with 44, home runs with 28, RBIs with 120, and batting average with .368.

Although he had a stellar year in 1933, the Phillies traded him after the season to the Chicago Cubs. Less than two years later, he returned to the Phillies. In 1939, he was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates after playing in 25 games with Philadelphia. He didn't stay long, however, with Pittsburgh and after just 85 games in 1939, Klein returned the following season to the Phillies. From 1941 through 1944, Klein was just a part-time player on the team, playing in only 80 games over those four seasons.

Statistics for Klein in 12 full seasons (1929-1940) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 250 in 1930
  • 6 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 59 in 1930
  • 8 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 43 in 1929
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 170 in 1930
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .386 in 1930

Career statistics for Klein include:

  • 1,753 games played
  • 2,076 hits
  • 398 doubles
  • 300 home runs
  • 1,201 RBIs
  • .320 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Chuck Klein
ESPN Sports - Chuck Klein


Steve Carlton (1994)

Steve Carlton was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1963. After one season in the minor leagues, he joined the Cardinals for 15 games in 1965. He spent most of 1966 in the minor leagues, pitching in just nine games with the Cardinals that season. In 1967, his first season as part of the starting rotation for the Cardinals, Carlton had a 14-9 record with 168 strikeouts to 62 walks and a 2.98 ERA in 30 games.

After seven years with the Cardinals, Carlton was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies before the start of the 1972 season. In his first season with the Phillies, Carlton won his first of four Cy Young awards. The 1972 season was perhaps his best one, with a 27-10 record, 310 strikeouts to 84 walks, and a 1.97 ERA in 41 games. In addition to his Cy Young award, Carlton won the National League Triple Crown that season, leading the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts.

Carlton won his second Cy Young award in 1977. That season he had a 23-10 record, 198 strikeouts to 89 walks, and a 2.64 ERA in 36 games. Three years later, he won a third Cy Young award, this time with a 24-9 record and a 2.34 ERA. In 1982, he won his fourth and final Cy Young award, ending that season with a 23-11 record and a 3.10 ERA. He had 286 strikeouts in both 1981 and 1982.

In 1981, Carlton won a Gold Glove, making no errors that season in 190.0 innings. Career fielding statistics for Carlton include:

  • 741 games played
  • 42 errors
  • 724 assists
  • 109 putouts
  • .952 fielding percentage

Injuries in 1985 led to a slump in Carlton's career and he spent the 1986 season with three teams. He played with the Phillies for sixteen games before being traded to the San Francisco Giants. After six games with the Giants and getting strikeout number 4,000, Carlton retired but that retirement only lasted until he was offered a contract with the Chicago White Sox. He pitched in ten games with the White Sox to end his 1986 season. In 1987, he signed with the Cleveland Indians but after twenty-three games, they traded him to the Minnesota Twins. Carlton pitched in nine games for the Twins in 1987 and just four games in 1988. When he couldn't find a team that wanted to sign him in 1989, Carlton retired as a major league pitcher.

Carlton was the last pitcher in major league baseball to pitch more than 300 innings in a season. He was also the last National League pitcher to win 25 or more games in one season. In 1972, Carlton led the National League in wins with 27, complete games with 30, strikeouts with 310, and an ERA with 1.97.

Pitching statistics for Carlton in 24 seasons (1965-1988) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 27 in 1972
  • 18 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 310 in 1972
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.97 in 1972

Career statistics for Carlton include:

  • 741 games played
  • 5,217.1 innings pitched
  • 329-244 win-loss record
  • 4,136 strikeouts to 1,833 walks
  • 3.22 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Steve Carlton
ESPN Sports - Steve Carlton
Baseball Reference.com - Steve Carlton


Richie Ashburn (1995)

Richie Ashburn started his professional baseball career in 1945 in the minor leagues. He served in the US military in 1946 and returned to the minor leagues for one more season in 1947. A year later, he was in the major leagues, playing in 117 games with the Philadelphia Phillies. In his first season in the major leagues, Ashburn batted .333, with 154 hits, 17 doubles, and 32 stolen bases.

In 1955, Ashburn won the National League batting title with 180 hits, 32 doubles, and a .338 batting average. Three years later, he had his best season and he again won the batting title. In 1958, he batted .350 with 215 hits, 24 doubles, 13 triples, and 30 stolen bases in 152 games.

After the 1959 season, the Phillies traded Ashburn to the Chicago Cubs and he played with them for two years. In 1962, he joined the New York Mets and played his last season with them, batting .306 that year.

After retiring as a player, Ashburn had a long and successful career as a radio and TV broadcaster for the Phillies. He started in 1963 and continued in this second career until his death, 35 years later, in 1997.

Career statistics for Ashburn in 15 seasons (1948-1962) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 221 in 1951
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high 32 in 1955
  • 3 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 14 in 1950
  • 3 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 32 in 1948
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high .350 in 1958

Career statistics for Ashburn include:

  • 2,189 games played
  • 2,574 hits
  • 317 doubles
  • 109 triples
  • 234 stolen bases
  • .308 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Richie Ashburn
ESPN Sports - Richie Ashburn


Mike Schmidt (1995)

Mike Schmidt, after playing baseball in college, was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1971. He spent that season and most of the following one in the minor leagues, playing at shortstop, second base, and third base. He played in 13 games with the Phillies the following year. In 1973, his first full season in the major leagues, Schmidt batted .196 with 72 hits, 11 doubles, and 18 home runs in 132 games. The following season, Schmidt set a fielding record for third basemen with 404 assists.

An excellent fielder, Schmidt won 10 Gold Gloves as a third baseman. He won his first one in 1976 with 21 errors and a .961 fielding percentage in 160 games. From 1976 through 1984, Schmidt dominated third base and he won a Gold Glove award in each of those seasons. He won his last Gold Glove in 1986. Career fielding statistics for Schmidt at third base include:

  • 2,212 games played
  • 3113 errors
  • 5,045 assists
  • 450 double plays
  • 1,591 putouts
  • .955 fielding percentage

In 1980, one of his best seasons, Schmidt won the first of three National League MVP awards and the first of six Silver Slugger awards. That season he batted .286 with 157 hits, 25 doubles, 48 home runs, and 121 RBIs in 150 games. He also won the World Series MVP award in 1980, batting .289 with 13 hits, 2 doubles, 2 home runs, and 8 RBIs in 11 games in the post season. The following season, Schmidt again won the National League MVP award, this time for batting .316 with 112 hits, 19 doubles, 31 home runs, and 91 RBIs in 102 games.

Schmidt won his third MVP award and his sixth Silver Slugger award in 1986. That season he led the National League in home runs for the eighth time and in RBIs for the fourth time. He batted .290 with 160 hits, 29 doubles, 37 home runs, and 119 RBIs in 160 games. Three seasons later, Schmidt ended his major league playing career. He retired on May 29, 1989, after playing in 42 games with the Phillies.

In his long career with the Phillies, Schmidt won three MVP awards (1980, 1981, 1986), six Silver Slugger awards (1980-1984, 1986), ten Gold Gloves (1976-1984,1986), and one World Series MVP award (1980). He led the National League in home runs eight times (1974-1976, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986) and in RBIs four times (1980, 1981, 1984, 1986).

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Schmidt worked as a broadcaster for the Phillies (1990), a hitting coach in Spring training for the Phillies (2002), and a manager of a Phillies' minor league team.

Schmidt played in over 100 games in each of 16 seasons (1973-1988). His batting statistics during those seasons include:

  • 6 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 160 in 1974 and 1986
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 34 in 1975
  • 13 seasons with over 30 home runs, with a high of 48 in 1980
  • 9 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 121 in 1980

Career batting statistics for Schmidt include:

  • 2,404 games played
  • 2,234 hits
  • 408 doubles
  • 548 home runs
  • 1,595 RBIs
  • .267 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Mike Schmidt
ESPN Sports - Mike Schmidt
Baseball Reference.com - Mike Schmidt


Jim Bunning (1996)

Jim Bunning, who is best known in his home state of Kentucky as a US senator, had a successful career in major league baseball before entering politics. Prior to joining the Detroit Tigers in 1955, Bunning spent five years in the minor leagues. In 1955 and 1956, he played in 15 games each season with the Tigers. The following season, his first full one in the major leagues, Bunning pitched in 45 games and had a 20-8 record with 182 strikeouts to 72 walks and a 2.69 ERA. That season he led the American League in wins.

In July, 1958, Bunning pitched a no hitter. The following year, he led the American League in strikeouts, a feat he repeated in 1960.

After nine good years with the Tigers, Bunning moved to the Philadelphia Phillies for six years. In 1964, his first year with the Phillies, Bunning pitched a perfect game. Three years later, he led the National League in strikeouts with 253.

Bunning stayed with the Phillies through the 1967 season, then moved to the Pittsburgh Pirates for the 1968 season. In 1969, after 25 games with Pittsburgh, Bunning was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers. He played in only nine games with the Dodgers and the next year, 1970, he returned for two seasons to the Phillies, where he ended his career.

Bunning started his political career in 1977 with a position on a city council. He then moved up to the State Senate, the US House of Representatives (1987-1999), and the US Senate (1999-2010).

Career statistics for Bunning in 17 seasons (1955-1971) in the major leagues include:

  • 12 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 268 in 1965
  • 6 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.29 in 1967

Career statistics for Bunning include:

  • 591 games played
  • 3,760.1 innings pitched
  • 224-184 win-loss record
  • 2,855 strikeouts to 1,000 walks
  • 3.27 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jim Bunning
ESPN Sports - Jim Bunning