Pittsburgh Pirates - Baseball Hall of Fame

Honus Wagner (1936)

Honus Wagner started his professional baseball career in 1896 in the Atlantic League. The following season, he was with the Louisville Colonels of the National League. In 1900, he moved to the Pittsburgh Pirates and stayed with them through the 1917 season. In his first season with the Pirates, Wagner led the National League in batting (.381), doubles (45), and triples (22). That season turned out to be his best one.

Although Wagner played shortstop for most of his career, he played different positions in his first few seasons in the major league, becoming a permanent shortstop in 1904. In his last season, 1917, at the age of 44, Wagner became the manager as well as the shortstop for the Pirates.

During his 21 seasons in the major leagues, Wagner led the National League in stolen bases five times. He also held the NL batting title eight times between 1900 and 1911.

After retiring as a player and manager, Wagner stayed with the Pirates until 1951, serving as a coach and hitting instructor. He also ran a sporting goods company. In 1942, he was elected Deputy County Sheriff of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

Statistics for Wagner in 21 seasons (1897-1917) in the major leagues include:

  • 16 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 201 in 1900 and 1908
  • 14 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 22 in 1900
  • 9 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with a high of 113 in 1899
  • 18 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 61 in 1907
  • 16 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .381 in 1900

Career statistics for Wagner include:

  • 2,792 games played
  • 3,415 hits
  • 640 doubles
  • 252 triples
  • 1,732 RBIs
  • 722 stolen bases
  • .327 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Honus Wagner
ESPN Sports - Honus Wagner


Fred Clarke (1945)

Fred Clarke started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1893. After a year and a half in the minors, he joined the Louisville Colonels of the National League as a left fielder, playing in 75 games with them. In 1895, his first full season in the major leagues, Clarke batted .347 with 191 hits, 21 doubles, 82 RBIs, and 40 stolen bases in 132 games. From 1897 through 1899, Clarke was player-manager for the Colonels.

In 1900, after the Colonels folded, Clarke moved to the Pittsburgh Pirates and he immediately became their player-manager. In his first season with the Pirates, Clarke batted .276 with 110 hits, 15 doubles, and 21 stolen bases in 106 games. In 1903, he had one of his best seasons, batting .351 with 150 hits, 32 doubles, 15 triples, 70 RBIs, and 21 stolen bases in 104 games. That season he led the National League in doubles.

Clarke had an excellent ability to spot strikes and balls and he rarely struck out. In 1909, he walked 80 times while never striking out all season. From 1894-1911, Clarke went without a single strikeout. His career record was 135 strikeouts to 874 walks.

Clarke managed the Pirates through the 1915 season. His career record as a manager was 1,602 wins to 1,181 losses. He led the Pirates to four National League pennant wins (1901-1903, 1909) and one World Series win (1909).

After retiring as a major league player, Clarke stayed with the Pirates in various positions, including coach, vice president, and assistant manager.

Statistics for Clarke in 21 seasons (1894-1911, 1913-1915) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 206 in 1899
  • 14 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 18 in 1896
  • 14 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 57 in 1897
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .390 in 1897

Career statistics for Clarke include:

  • 2,242 games played
  • 2,672 hits
  • 220 triples
  • 506 stolen bases
  • .312 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Fred Clarke
ESPN Sports - Fred Clarke


Pie Traynor (1948)

Pie Traynor began as a shortstop in the minor leagues in 1920. That same year, he was called up to the majors and he played in seventeen games with the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1922, he switched to third base and stayed in that position for the rest of his career. That season, his first full one in the major leagues, Traynor batted .282 with 161 hits, 17 doubles, 12 triples, 81 RBIs, and 17 stolen bases in 142 games.

In 1923, Traynor had his career highs in hits with 208, triples with 19, and home runs with 12. He led the National League in triples that year. One of his best seasons was 1930 when he had a career high .366 batting average and a career high 119 RBIs.

Traynor was player-manager for the Pirates from 1934 through the 1937 season. He played in just 57 games in 1935, no games in 1936, and only five games in 1937, his last season as a major league player. He continued, however, as manager of the Pirates for two more seasons. His record as a manager was 484 wins to 430 losses.

After retiring as a major league player and manager, Traynor served as a scout for the Pirates. In 1944, Traynor started a second career as a radio sports announcer. He was successful in this venture, also, and he remained in radio until he retired in 1965.

Statistics for Traynor in 17 seasons (1920-1937) in the major leagues include:

  • 12 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 208 in 1923
  • 4 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 39 in 1925
  • 11 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 19 in 1923
  • 7 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 124 in 1928
  • 10 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .366 in 1930

Career statistics for Traynor include:

  • 1,941 games played
  • 2,416 hits
  • 371 doubles
  • 164 triples
  • 1,273 RBIs
  • .320 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Pie Traynor
ESPN Sports - Pie Traynor


Paul Waner (1952)

Paul Waner, along with his brother Lloyd, played for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Paul started his professional baseball career in 1923 in the minor leagues. In 1926, Waner had a very strong rookie year with the Pirates, batting .336 with 180 hits, 35 doubles, and 79 RBIs in 144 games. He also had a league and career high 22 triples.

In 1927, Waner led the National League in hits, triples, RBIs, and batting average and he won the National League MVP award and batting title. That season he batted a career high .380 with 42 doubles, 18 triples, and career highs in hits with 237 and in RBIs with 131. The following season, he led the National League in doubles, a feat he repeated in 1932.

Waner again won the National League batting title in 1934. That season he batted .362 with 217 hits, 32 doubles, 16 triples, and 90 RBIs in 146 games. Two years later, in 1936, he won a third batting title, this time batting .373 with 218 hits, 53 doubles, and 94 RBIs.

In 1941, after fifteen seasons with the Pirates, Waner went to the Brooklyn Dodgers. He only played in eleven games with the Dodgers before being traded to the Boston Braves. In 1943, he returned to the Dodgers for 82 games that season and 83 games the next year. Waner played his last ten games with the New York Yankees, playing in nine games in 1944 and just one final game in 1945.

After retiring as a major league player, Waner was a player-manager with a minor league team in 1946.

Statistics for Waner in 15 seasons (1926-1940) with the Pirates include:

  • 14 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 237 in 1927
  • 13 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 62 in 1932
  • 10 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 22 in 1926
  • 13 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .380 in 1927

Career statistics for Waner include:

  • 2,549 games played
  • 3,152 hits
  • 605 doubles
  • 191 triples
  • .333 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Paul Waner
ESPN Sports - Paul Waner


Max Carey (1961)

Max Carey started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1909. He spent most of the following season in the minor leagues, playing in just two games with the Pittsburgh Pirates that season. In 1911, his first full season in the major leagues, Carey batted .258 with 110 hits, 15 doubles, 10 triples, and 27 stolen bases in 129 games.

Carey led the National League in triples in 1914 with 17. Nine years later, he repeated the feat with a league and career high 19 triples. In 1923, he batted .308 with 188 hits, 32 doubles, and 19 triples in 153 games.

In 1926, the Pirates traded Carey to the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers. He then played with Brooklyn through the 1929 season. He played in just 19 games in his final season with the Robins.

Carey was known for his base stealing and he led the National League in stolen bases 10 times, starting in 1913. From 1915-1920 and then again from 1922-1925, he was the leading base stealer in the National League. Carey stole home 33 times, a better record held only by Ty Cobb who stole home 50 times.

Carey was a good defensive center fielder for most of his career. His career fielding statistics include:

  • 1,542 games played
  • 172 errors
  • 215 assists
  • 4,369 putouts
  • .964 fielding percentage

After ending his career as a major league player, Carey returned to the Brooklyn Dodgers as their manager in 1932 and 1933. His record as a manager was 146 wins to 161 losses.

Statistics for Carey in 18 full seasons (1911-1928) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 207 in 1922
  • 5 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 39 in 1925
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 19 in 1923
  • 15 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 63 in 1916
  • 6 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .343 in 1925

Career statistics for Carey include:

  • 2,476 games played
  • 2,665 hits
  • 419 doubles
  • 159 triples
  • 738 stolen bases
  • .285 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Max Carey
ESPN Sports - Max Carey
Baseball Reference.com - Max Carey


Lloyd Waner (1967)

Lloyd Waner, whose brother Paul is also in the Baseball Hall of Fame, played for five different teams over an 18 year major league career. He started his professional baseball career in 1925 in the minor leagues. Although he struggled in his first season, he ended the 1926 season with a batting average of .345 and a minor league MVP award.

Waner had an excellent rookie season in 1927 with the Pittsburgh Pirates. That season he led the National League in singles and he had 223 hits, 17 doubles, and a .355 batting average in 150 games. The following season, Waner had 221 hits and he again led the league in singles. In 1929, he led the National League in singles and triples and he had career highs in hits with 234 and in triples with 20.

In 1931, Waner led the National League in hits with 214 and he batted .314. He continued playing well until 1939 when his production began to decline. He batted .285 that year but just .259 the following season, playing in just 72 games with the Pirates in 1940. The next year, Waner played for three different teams (Pirates, Boston Braves, Cincinnati Reds). After leaving the Reds in 1941, Waner played for the Philadelphia Phillies in 1942 and the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1944. He finished his career with the Pirates in 1944 and 1945. In his last five seasons (1940-1942, 1944-1945), Waner never played in more than 101 games in a season, with just 34 games in 1944 and 23 games in 1945.

Waner was a center fielder for most of his major league career. His career fielding statistics include:

  • 1,660 games played
  • 73 errors
  • 4,530 putouts
  • .984 fielding percentage

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Waner worked as a scout for the Pirates and the Baltimore Orioles.

Statistics for Waner in 14 seasons (1927-1940) with the Pirates include:

  • 9 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 234 in 1929
  • 5 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 20 in 1929
  • 10 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .362 in 1930

Career statistics for Waner include:

  • 1,993 games played
  • 2,459 hits
  • 118 triples
  • .316 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Lloyd Waner
ESPN Sports - Lloyd Waner
Baseball Reference.com - Lloyd Waner


Jake Beckley (1971)

Jake Beckley started his professional baseball career in the Western Association at the age of 18. In the middle of the 1888 season, his contract was sold to the Pittsburgh Alleghenys/Pirates. In 1889, his first full season in the major leagues, Beckley batted .301 with 157 hits, 24 doubles, 10 triples, and 97 RBIs in 123 games.

In 1890, Beckley moved to the Pittsburgh Burghers of the Players League. That season he led the league in triples with 22. He had a strong season, batting .324 with 167 hits, 38 doubles, 22 triples, and 120 RBIs in 121 games.

When the Players League folded after the 1890 season, Beckley returned to the Pirates. In 1894, he had another strong season with a career high 120 RBIs and a career high batting average of .343. That season he also had 183 hits, 36 doubles, and 18 triples.

In July, 1896, after 59 games, the Pirates traded Beckley to the New York Giants. Less than a year later, he was released by the Giants and signed with the Cincinnati Reds in May, 1897. He then stayed with the Reds for seven seasons. In February, 1904, Beckley's contract was sold to the St. Louis Cardinals and he played with them through the 1907 season, playing, however, in just 32 games in his last season.

Beckley was a first baseman for his entire major league career. His career fielding statistics at first base include:

  • 2,380 games played
  • 481 errors
  • 1,316 assists
  • 1,327 double plays
  • 23,731 putouts
  • .981 fielding percentage

After ending his major league playing career, Beckley played and managed in the American, Western, and Central Associations from 1908 through 1911. From 1913 on, he took various jobs in baseball, including umpiring in the Federal League and coaching at colleges.

Statistics for Beckley in 20 seasons (1888-1907) in the major leagues include:

  • 12 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 190 in 1900
  • 5 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 38 in 1890
  • 14 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 22 in 1890
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 120 in 1890 and 1894
  • 9 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 30 in 1892
  • 15 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .343 in 1888 and 1894

Career statistics for Beckley include:

  • 2,386 games played
  • 2,930 hits
  • 473 doubles
  • 243 triples
  • 1,575 RBIs
  • 315 stolen bases
  • .308 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jake Beckley
ESPN Sports - Jake Beckley
Baseball Reference.com - Jake Beckley


Roberto Clemente (1973)

Roberto Clemente played with the Pittsburgh Pirates for 18 years, starting in 1955 and ending with his tragic death in 1972. Clemente, who was just 38 at the time, was on his way to deliver aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua when the plane he was on crashed. The Pirates lost a great player and the world lost a great humanitarian.

Clemente, who was born in Puerto Rico, started playing baseball professionally in his home country at the age of 16. He was originally signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers and he played in the minor leagues before being drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954. In 1955, his first season with the Pirates, Clemente batted .255 with 121 hits, 23 doubles, and 11 triples in 124 games. He had a much better second season, batting .311 with 169 hits and 30 doubles in 1956.

In 1961, Clemente won the National League batting title with a .351 batting average and 201 hits. He won three more batting titles in his career (1964, 1965, 1967). He had a career high batting average of .357 in 1967 when he won his last batting title.

Clemente won the National League MVP award in 1966. That season he batted .317 with 202 hits, 31 doubles, 11 triples, and career highs in home runs with 29 and RBIs with 119. In 1971, Clemente won the World Series MVP award. He had both a strong season and post-season that year. In the regular season, he batted .341 in 132 games and in the post-season, he batted .383 with 18 hits and 8 RBIs in 11 games.

An outstanding right fielder, Clemente won 12 consecutive Gold Glove awards (1961-1972). His career fielding statistics include:

  • 2,306 games played
  • 132 errors
  • 254 assists
  • 4,449 putouts
  • .973 fielding percentage

Batting statistics for Clemente in 18 seasons(1955-1972) in the major leagues include:

  • 12 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 209 in 1967
  • 4 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 40 in 1964
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 14 in 1965
  • 3 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 29 in 1966
  • 13 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .357 in 1967

Career batting statistics for Clemente include:

  • 2,433 games played
  • 3,000 hits
  • 440 doubles
  • 166 triples
  • 240 home runs
  • 1,305 RBIs
  • .317 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Roberto Clemente
ESPN Sports - Roberto Clemente
Baseball Reference.com - Roberto Clemente


Ralph Kiner (1975)

Ralph Kiner was a power-hitting left fielder for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1946 through 1952. In June of 1953, the Pirates traded Kiner to the Chicago Cubs. After two seasons with the Cubs, Kiner finished his major league career with the Cleveland Indians in 1955. Although he was only 32, he retired after the 1955 season due to a back injury.

In his first season with the Pirates in 1946, Kiner batted just .247 with 124 hits, 17 doubles, 23 home runs, and 81 RBIs in 144 games. In his second season, Kiner showed his real power and potential with a .313 batting average, 177 hits, 23 doubles, 51 home runs, and 127 RBIs in 152 games.

After retiring as a player, Kiner started a very successful and long second career as a baseball announcer, first with the Chicago White Sox in 1961. The following year, he started a 52 year career as a broadcaster for the New York Mets, a position he still holds at age 90.

Kiner was a power hitter and he led the National League in home runs for seven consecutive seasons (1946-1952). In 1949, he also led the National League in RBIs with 127.

Statistics for Kiner in 10 seasons (1946-1955) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 177 in 1947
  • 9 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 54 in 1949
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 127 in 1947 and 1949
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .313 in 1947

Career statistics for Kiner include:

  • 1,472 games played
  • 1,451 hits
  • 369 home runs
  • 1,015 RBIs
  • .279 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ralph Kiner
ESPN Sports - Ralph Kiner


Arky Vaughan (1985)

Arky Vaughan started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues at age 19. Shortly after that, in 1932, he was called up to the Pittsburgh Pirates as a backup shortstop but he soon won the role of starting shortstop. At the time, he was the youngest player in the major leagues. Vaughan had a strong rookie year batting .318, with 158 hits, 15 doubles, 10 triples, and 10 stolen bases in 129 games. Although he batted well, he struggled with defense in his first few years with the Pirates, making the most errors in the major leagues in 1932 and 1933.

After 10 seasons with the Pirates, Vaughan was traded to the Brooklyn Dodgers in December, 1941. He retired after two seasons but attempted a return in 1947 as a utility player. He played in just 64 games that season and after 65 games in 1948, Vaughan was released at the end of the season. He played in the minor leagues the following season and then retired from baseball. In August, 1952, Vaughan died in a boating accident at the age of 40.

In 1933, Vaughan led the National League in triples with 19, but his best season came two years later. He won the National League batting title in 1935 with a .385 batting average. That season, he had 192 hits, 34 doubles, 10 triples, 19 home runs, and 99 RBIs in 137 games.

Statistics for Vaughan in 12 full seasons (1932-1943) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 192 in 1935
  • 7 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 41 in 1934
  • 8 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 19 in 1933
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .385 in 1935

Career statistics for Vaughan include:

  • 1,817 games played
  • 2,103 hits
  • 356 doubles
  • 128 triples
  • .318 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Arky Vaughan
ESPN Sports - Arky Vaughan


Willie Stargell (1988)

Willie Stargell started his professional baseball career in 1959 in the minor leagues. He spent almost four years in the minors before getting the chance to play in ten games with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1962. The following season, he played in 108 games and batted just .243. Stargell's first strong season was 1966, when he had a career high batting average of .315. That season he had 153 hits, 30 doubles, 33 home runs, and 102 RBIs in 140 games.

In 1971, Stargell led the National League in home runs with a career high of 48. That season he also had a career high in RBIs with 125. Two years later, he again led the league in home runs as well as leading in RBIs and doubles. In 1973, he batted .299 with 156 hits, a career high 43 doubles, 44 home runs, and 119 RBIs in 148 games.

Unlike most other major league players, some of Stargell's strongest seasons didn't come early in his career but, rather, they came towards the end of it. In 1978, after 16 years in the major leagues, Stargell was named the National League Comeback Player of the Year. That season he batted .295 with 115 hits, 18 doubles, 28 home runs, and 97 RBIs in 122 games. The following year, he was named the National League MVP (along with Keith Hernandez of the St. Louis Cardinals), the National League Championship series MVP, and the World Series MVP. In 1979, Stargell batted .281 with 119 hits, 19 doubles, 32 home runs, and 82 RBIs in 126 games. In the post-season that year, he batted .415 with 17 hits, 6 doubles, 5 home runs, and 13 RBIs in 10 games.

The 1979 season was Stargell's last full season in the major leagues. In his last three seasons, he never played in more than 74 games and his highest batting average was .283 in 1981 in just 38 games. Stargell retired as a major league player after the 1982 season.

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Stargell coached for the Atlanta Braves.

Stargell played in over 100 games in each of 16 seasons (1963-1976, 1978-1979). His statistics during that time include:

  • 5 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 160 in 1969
  • 5 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 43 in 1973
  • 15 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 48 in 1971
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 125 in 1971
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .315 in 1966

Career statistics for Stargell include:

  • 2,360 games played
  • 2,232 hits
  • 423 doubles
  • 475 home runs
  • 1,540 RBIs
  • .282 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Willie Stargell
ESPN Sports - Willie Stargell


Bill Mazeroski (2001)

Bill Mazeroski was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1954 at the age of just 17. In 1956, after a year and a half in the minor leagues, he played in 81 games with the Pirates, batting .243 with 62 hits. In 1960, Mazeroski won the World Series for the Pirates by hitting a walk-off home run in game seven of the series. Mazeroski played for the Pirates through 1972, playing in only 34 games in his last season.

Although Mazeroski was not the power hitter of some of the other Pirates who are in the Hall of Fame, he was an outstanding fielder. He led the National League in assists nine times and he holds the major league baseball records for the most career double plays by a second baseman and the most single season double plays at second base (161 in 1966). He won eight Gold Glove awards (1958, 1960, 1961, 1963-1967). Career fielding statistics for Mazeroski at second base include:

  • 2,094 games played
  • 204 errors
  • 6,685 assists
  • 1,706 double plays
  • 4,974 putouts
  • .983 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Mazeroski include:

  • 2,163 games played
  • 2,016 hits
  • 294 doubles
  • .260 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bill Mazeroski
ESPN Sports - Bill Mazeroski
Baseball Reference.com - Bill Mazeroski