Cincinnati Reds - Baseball Hall of Fame

Edd Roush (1962)

Edd Roush started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1912. A year later, he played in nine games with the Chicago White Sox. In 1914, he joined the Indianapolis Hoosiers/Newark Peppers of the Federal League. After the team folded in 1915, Roush moved to the New York Giants. In mid-season 1916, after just 39 games with the Giants, Roush moved to the Cincinnati Reds.

In 1917, his first full season with the Reds, Roush won the National League batting title and he led the league in singles. That season he batted .341 with 178 hits, 19 doubles, and 14 triples. Two years later, in 1919, Roush again won the National League batting title with a .321 batting average.

Roush led the National League in doubles in 1923 with 41 and the following season he led the league in triples with 21. In 1928, Roush played in just 46 games and he didn't play at all in 1930. He played in 101 games in 1931, his last season as a major league player, and he batted .271.

Roush was a center fielder for most of his career. His career fielding statistics include:

  • 1,607 games played
  • 137 errors
  • 222 assists
  • 4,537 putouts
  • .972 fielding percentage

Roush played in over 100 games in each of 14 seasons (1915-1921, 1923-1927, 1929, 1931). His statistics during those seasons include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 196 in 1920
  • 12 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 21 in 1924
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with highs of .352 in 1921 and .351 in 1923

Career statistics for Roush include:

  • 1,967 games played
  • 2,376 hits
  • 339 doubles
  • 182 triples
  • 268 stolen bases
  • .323 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Edd Roush
ESPN Sports - Edd Roush
Baseball Reference.com - Edd Roush


Eppa Rixey (1963)

The Philadelphia Phillies signed Eppa Rixey in 1912 while he was still at the University of Virginia. He pitched in 23 games for the Phillies that year and he had a 10-10 record and a 2.50 ERA in 162.0 innings.

In 1918, Rixey suspended his baseball career to serve in World War I. After returning to the Phillies, he struggled in the 1919 and 1920 seasons and they traded him to the Cincinnati Reds prior to the 1921 season. That trade proved fruitful to both Rixey and the Reds as he found his pitches again and had his best season in 1922. That year he led the National League in wins with a career high of 25 wins.

Rixey led the National League in shutouts in 1924, pitching four shutout games that season. He played in 35 games and had a 15-14 record and a 2.76 ERA. Rixey continued to pitch for the Reds through the 1933 season. In his last season as a major league pitcher, Rixey had a 6-3 record and 3.15 ERA in 16 games.

Statistics for Rixey in 21 seasons (1912-1917, 1919-1933) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 25 wins in 1922
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.85 in 1916

Career statistics for Rixey include:

  • 692 games played
  • 4,494.2 innings pitched
  • 266-251 win-loss record
  • 1,350 strikeouts to 1,082 walks
  • 3.15 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Eppa Rixey
ESPN Sports - Eppa Rixey


Ernie Lombardi (1986)

Ernie Lombardi spent five years in the minor leagues before making his first start in the major leagues. In 1931, he made his major league start, playing in 73 games with the Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers. He was traded to the Cincinnati Reds prior to the 1932 season. In 1932, his first full season in the major leagues, Lombardi batted .303 with 125 hits, 22 doubles, and 68 RBIs.

In 1938, Lombardi won the National League MVP award and he led the league in batting average. That season he batted .342 with 167 hits, 30 doubles, 19 home runs, and 95 RBIs in 129 games.

The Boston Braves purchased Lombardi's contract from the Reds during the 1942 season. Lombardi won the National League batting title that season, ending the year with a .330 batting average.

The Braves traded Lombardi after the 1942 season to the New York Giants and he stayed with the Giants until his retirement five years later. In 1947, his last season in the major leagues, Lombardi played in just 48 games.

Lombardi spent his entire career as a catcher. His career fielding statistics include:

  • 1,544 games played
  • 143 errors
  • 845 assists
  • 5,694 putouts
  • .979 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Lombardi include:

  • 1,853 games played
  • 1,792 hits
  • 277 doubles
  • 190 home runs
  • .306 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ernie Lombardi
ESPN Sports - Ernie Lombardi
Baseball Reference.com - Ernie Lombardi


Johnny Bench (1989)

Johnny Bench, one of the best catchers in baseball history, played for 17 years with the Cincinnati Reds "Big Red Machine" of the 1970s. Bench started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1965. Two years later, he was named the 1967 Minor League Player of the Year. That same year, he had his first start in the major leagues, playing in 26 games with the Reds.

In 1968, his first full season in the major leagues, Bench won the National League Rookie of the Year award. That season he batted .275 with 155 hits, 40 doubles, 15 home runs, and 82 RBIs in 154 games.

Bench had one of his best seasons in 1970 when he won the National League MVP award and led the league in home runs and RBIs. That season he batted .293 with career highs in hits with 177, home runs with 45, and RBIs with 148. Two years later, Bench won the MVP award for a second time and he again led the National League in home runs and RBIs. In 1972, he batted .270 with 145 hits, 22 doubles, 40 home runs, and 125 RBIs in 147 games.

In 1974, Bench again led the National League in RBIs, this time with 129. Two years later, in 1976, he won the World Series MVP award. In the post-season that year, he batted .444 with 12 hits, 3 home runs, and 7 RBIs in seven games.

Bench was one of the greatest defensive catchers in major league history and he won 10 consecutive Gold Glove awards. He won his first one in 1968, making 9 errors that season, and having 102 assists, 942 putouts, and a .991 fielding percentage. Career fielding statistics for Bench as a catcher include:

  • 1,742 games played
  • 97 errors
  • 850 assists
  • 9,249 putouts
  • .990 fielding percentage

Bench played at first base in his last three years before retiring in 1983. In his last season in the major leagues, he batted .255 in 110 games.

Batting statistics for Bench in 17 seasons (1967-1983) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 177 in 1970
  • 5 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 40 in 1968
  • 11 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 45 in 1970
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 148 in 1970

Career batting statistics for Bench include:

  • 2,158 games played
  • 2,048 hits
  • 381 doubles
  • 389 home runs
  • 1,376 RBIs
  • .267 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Johnny Bench
ESPN Sports - Johnny Bench
Baseball Reference.com - Johnny Bench


Joe Morgan (1990)

Although Joe Morgan spent ten years with the Houston Astros, it was his eight years with the Cincinnati Reds "Big Red Machine" of the 1970s that made him known to most major league baseball fans. In addition to his years in Houston and Cincinnati, Morgan spent two years with the San Francisco Giants, one year with the Philadelphia Phillies, and his final year with the Oakland Athletics. Morgan was probably best-known for his defensive plays at second base and for his speed on the bases, with consistently high stolen base statistics.

Morgan was first signed in 1962 by the Houston Colt .45's/Astros. However, he only played in eight games with them in 1963 and ten games in 1964, spending most of those two seasons in the minor leagues. In 1965, his first full season in the major leagues, Morgan batted .271 with 163 hits, 22 doubles, and 20 stolen bases in 157 games.

In 1971, his last season with the Astros, Morgan led the National League in triples with 11. During the next season, his first season with the Cincinnati Reds, Morgan won the All Star Game MVP award. In 1972, he batted .292 with 161 hits, 23 doubles, and 58 stolen bases in 149 games.

Morgan was an excellent defensive second baseman and he won five consecutive Gold Gloves. He won his first one in 1973, making nine errors that season and having 440 assists, 106 defensive double plays, 417 putouts, and a .990 fielding percentage. Career fielding statistics for Morgan at second base include:

  • 2,527 games played
  • 244 errors
  • 6,967 assists
  • 1,505 double plays
  • 5,742 putouts
  • .981 fielding percentage

Two of Morgan's best seasons were 1975 and 1976 when he won back-to-back National League MVP awards. In 1975, he had a .327 batting average with 163 hits, 27 doubles, 94 RBIs, and a career high 67 stolen bases. The next year, he had career highs in home runs with 27 and in RBIs with 111.

After his successful years with the Reds, Morgan returned to the Astros for a year in 1980. He then moved to the San Francisco Giants for two seasons. In 1982, his second year with the Giants, Morgan won the National League Comeback Player of the Year award. That season he batted .289 with 134 hits, 19 doubles, and 24 stolen bases in 134 games.

Morgan spent his last two seasons in the major leagues with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1983 and with the Oakland Athletics the following year. In 1984, his last season as a major league player, Morgan batted .244.

A year after retiring as a player, Morgan started a second successful career as a baseball broadcaster. Today he continues as a major broadcaster for the ESPN Sports baseball broadcasting team.

Batting statistics for Morgan in 22 seasons (1963-1984) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 167 in 1973
  • 3 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 35 in 1973
  • 4 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 27 in 1976
  • 14 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 67 in 1973 and 1975

Career batting statistics for Morgan include:

  • 2,649 games played
  • 2,517 hits
  • 449 doubles
  • 268 home runs
  • 1,133 RBIs
  • 689 stolen bases
  • .271 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe Morgan
ESPN Sports - Joe Morgan
Baseball Reference.com - Joe Morgan


Bid McPhee (2000)

Bid McPhee started his professional baseball career as a catcher in the minor leagues in 1877. Two years later, he became a second baseman, a position he held through most of his career. He played in the minor leagues from 1877 through 1879, he didn't play in 1880, and then in 1881, he played with an independent team.

McPhee signed with the Cincinnati Red Stockings/Reds in 1882. He played in 78 games with the Red Stockings that season. A good fielding second baseman, McPhee led the American Association in putouts and fielding percentage in 1882. The following season, he played in 96 games. In 1884, his first season with over 100 games, McPhee batted .278 with 125 hits and 64 RBIs in 112 games.

McPhee continued to play with the Red Stockings through 1899, his last season in the major leagues. In 1886, he led the American Association in home runs and he led the league in triples the following season.

After retiring as a player, McPhee managed the Cincinnati Reds in 1901 and 1902. His record as a manager was 79 wins to 124 losses.

Batting statistics for McPhee in 18 seasons (1882-1899) in the major leagues include:

  • 3 seasons with 150 or more hits, with highs of 156 in 1887 and 157 in 1892
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 22 in 1890
  • 12 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 95 in 1887
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with highs of .304 in 1894 and .305 in 1896

Career fielding statistics for McPhee at second base include:

  • 2,129 games played
  • 792 errors
  • 6,919 assists
  • 6,552 putouts
  • 1,188 double plays
  • .944 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for McPhee include:

  • 2,135 games played
  • 2,250 hits
  • 303 doubles
  • 188 triples
  • 568 stolen bases
  • .271 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bid McPhee
ESPN Sports - Bid McPhee
Baseball Reference.com - Bid McPhee


Tony Perez (2000)

Tony Perez, first baseman on the successful Cincinnati Reds "Big Red Machine" of the 1970s, started his baseball career in the Pacific Coast League. After winning the MVP award for his minor league achievements, Perez was moved up to the major leagues and the Cincinnati Reds at the end of 1964, playing in 12 games with the Reds that season. In 1965, Perez played in 104 games with the Reds and he had 73 hits and a .260 batting average.

In 1967, Perez won the MLB All Star Game MVP award. That season he batted .290 with 174 hits, 28 doubles, 26 home runs, and 102 RBIs in 156 games.

One of Perez's best seasons was the 1970 one. That year he batted .317 with career highs in hits with 186, home runs with 40, and RBIs with 129. Three years later, in 1973, he had another very strong season, batting .314, with 177 hits, 33 doubles, 27 home runs, and 101 RBIs.

In 1976, his last season with the Reds, Perez batted .260. The next season, Perez was traded to the Montreal Expos and he batted .283 in his first season with them. In 1980, Perez left the Expos and the National League and moved for three seasons to the American League and the Boston Red Sox. In 1983, he moved to the Philadelphia Phillies for one season. The next year, he returned to the Reds to finish out the last three years of his playing career. From 1981 through 1986, Perez was a part-time player, never playing in more than 100 games in any of those seasons.

Although Perez started at third base, he was moved to his successful first base position in 1972. Career fielding statistics for Perez at first base include:

  • 1,778 games played
  • 117 errors
  • 936 assists
  • 1,342 double plays
  • 14,481 putouts
  • .992 fielding percentage

After retiring as a player, Perez came back twice as a manager. In 1993, he managed his old team, the Cincinnati Reds, for one season and in 2001, he managed the Florida Marlins. His record as a manager was 149 wins to 175 losses. Today, Perez is a Special Assistant to the general manager of the Florida Marlins.

Batting statistics for Perez in 16 full seasons (1965-1980) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with highs of 185 in 1969 and 186 in 1970
  • 7 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 38 in 1978
  • 9 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 40 in 1970
  • 7 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 129 in 1970

Career batting statistics for Perez include:

  • 2,777 games played
  • 2,732 hits
  • 505 doubles
  • 379 home runs
  • 1,652 RBIs
  • .279 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Tony Perez
ESPN Sports - Tony Perez
Baseball Reference.com - Tony Perez


Barry Larkin (2012)

Barry Larkin started his professional baseball career in 1985 in the minor leagues. The following season, he played with the Cincinnati Reds in 41 games. In 1987, his first full season in the major leagues, Larkin batted .244 with 107 hits, 16 doubles, and 21 stolen bases in 125 games.

Larkin played his entire career with the Reds (1986-2004). During that time, he won three Gold Gloves (1994-1996), nine Silver Slugger awards (1988-1992, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999), and the National League MVP award in 1995. That season he batted .319 with 158 hits, 29 doubles, and 51 stolen bases in 131 games.

Batting statistics for Larkin in 19 seasons (1986-2004) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 185 in 1990
  • 6 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 37 in 2002
  • 9 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 51 in 1995
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .342 in 1989

Career fielding statistics for Larkin at shortstop include:

  • 1,285 games played
  • 130 errors
  • 3,395 assists
  • 683 double plays
  • 1,848 putouts
  • .976 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Larkin include:

  • 2,180 games played
  • 2,340 hits
  • 441 doubles
  • 379 stolen bases
  • .295 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Barry Larkin
ESPN Sports - Barry Larkin