Minnesota Twins - Baseball Hall of Fame

Walter Johnson (1936)

Walter Johnson was signed in 1907, at the age of 19, by the Washington Senators (modern day Minnesota Twins). He pitched in 14 games in 1907 and 36 games the following season. In 1908, Johnson had a 14-14 record with 160 strikeouts to 53 walks and an ERA of 1.65. Five years later, in 1913, Johnson won the American League MVP and Triple Crown awards. That season he played in 48 games with a 36-7 record, 243 strikeouts to 38 walks, and an ERA of 1.14.

Johnson again won the American League Triple Crown in 1918, pitching in 39 games with a 23-13 record, 162 strikeouts to 70 walks, and a 1.27 ERA. Two years later, he pitched a no hitter on July 1, 1920. In 1924, he won his second American League MVP award and his third Triple Crown award. That season he had a 23-7 record, 158 strikeouts to 77 walks, and an ERA of 2.72 in 38 games.

During his twenty-one year career as a major league pitcher, Johnson led the American League in wins six times (1913-1916, 1918, 1924), ERA five times (1912, 1913, 1918, 1919, 1924), and strikeouts twelve times (1910, 1912-1919, 1921, 1923, 1924). He holds the major league record for the most career shutouts with 110.

After retiring as a major league player, Johnson managed a minor league team in 1928. The following season he returned to the Senators as manager, a position he held through 1932. In 1933, he became manager of the Cleveland Indians and he stayed in that position through the 1935 season. His record as a manager was 529 wins to 432 losses.

Statistics for Johnson in 21 seasons (1907-1927) in the major leagues include:

  • 12 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 36 in 1913
  • 12 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 313 in 1910
  • 15 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.14 in 1913

Career statistics for Johnson include:

  • 802 games played
  • 5,914.2 innings pitched
  • 417-279 win-loss record
  • 3,509 strikeouts to 1,363 walks
  • 2.17 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Walter Johnson
ESPN Sports - Walter Johnson


Sam Rice (1963)

Sam Rice started his major league baseball career as a pitcher with the Washington Senators in 1915, pitching in four games with them that season. The following season, he was moved to the outfield for 53 games after pitching in five games. In 1917, his first full season in the major leagues, Rice batted .302 with 177 hits, 25 doubles, and 35 stolen bases in 155 games.

Rice played with the Senators through the 1933 season, but in 1918, he played in just seven games. His best season was probably 1925 when he batted .350 with 227 hits, 31 doubles, 13 triples, 87 RBIs, and 26 stolen bases. Rice played with the Cleveland Indians in 1934, his last season in the major leagues.

Rice led the American League in stolen bases in 1920 with 63. He also led the American League in hits twice.

Rice played in over 100 games in each of 15 seasons (1917, 1919-1932). His statistics during that time include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 227 in 1925
  • 10 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 39 in 1921, 1924, and 1929
  • 10 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 18 in 1923
  • 9 seasons with 20 or more stolen bases, with a high of 63 in 1920
  • 14 seasons with a batting average over .300, with highs of .349 in 1930 and .350 in 1925

Career statistics for Rice include:

  • 2,404 games played
  • 2,987 hits
  • 498 doubles
  • 184 triples
  • 1,078 RBIs
  • 351 stolen bases
  • .322 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Sam Rice
ESPN Sports - Sam Rice


Heinie Manush (1964)

Heinie Manush started his professional baseball career in 1920 in the minor leagues. In 1923, he joined the Detroit Tigers, playing in 109 games with them. That season he batted .334 with 103 hits and 20 doubles.

In 1926, Manush won the American League batting title with a .378 batting average. Although he played well with the Tigers, they traded him to the St. Louis Browns in 1928. That season he led the American League in hits with 241 and doubles with 47 and he again batted .378. A year later, he led the American League again in doubles, this time with 45. His batting average in 1929 was .355.

The Browns traded Manush to the Washington Senators after 49 games in 1930. During his time with the Senators (1930-1935), Manush led the American League in hits and triples in 1933 and in singles twice (1932 and 1933).

In 1936, Manush played in 82 games with the Boston Red Sox but the following year, he again found himself with a new team, the Brooklyn Dodgers. He played for one year and in seventeen games in a second season before the Dodgers traded him in 1938 to his last team, the Pittsburgh Pirates. This trade signaled the end of Manush's major league career as he played in only fifteen games with the Pirates in 1938 and in just ten games in 1939.

Manush was an outfielder for most of his major league career. His career fielding statistics as a left fielder include:

  • 1,381 games played
  • 54 errors
  • 76 assists
  • 2,875 putouts
  • .982 fielding percentage

Batting statistics for Manush in 17 seasons (1923-1939) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 241 in 1928
  • 9 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 49 in 1930
  • 8 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 20 in 1928
  • 10 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .378 in 1926 and 1928

Career statistics for Manush include:

  • 2,008 games played
  • 2,524 hits
  • 491 doubles
  • 160 triples
  • 1,183 RBIs
  • .330 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Heinie Manush
ESPN Sports - Heinie Manush
Baseball Reference.com - Heinie Manush


Goose Goslin (1968)

Goose Goslin started playing semi-pro baseball in 1916 when he was just 16 years old. Three years later, he was playing in the minor leagues as a pitcher. After signing with the Washington Senators, Goslin was moved to left field. He first played with the Senators in 14 games in 1921. The following season, his first full season in the major leagues, Goslin batted .324 with 116 hits and 19 doubles in 101 games.

Goslin won the American League batting title in 1928. He batted .379 that season with 173 hits, 36 doubles, 10 triples, 17 home runs, 102 RBIs, and 16 stolen bases in 135 games. In 1923, he led the American League in triples with 18. The following season, he led the league in RBIs with 129.

In 1930, after 47 games, the Senators traded Goslin to the St. Louis Browns (modern day Baltimore Orioles). After the 1932 season ended, the Browns traded him back to the Senators. However, he didn't stay long with the Senators - after one season, they traded him to the Detroit Tigers. He played with the Tigers through the 1937 season and then they released him. Goslin spent his last season in the major leagues, 1938, with his original team, the Washington Senators, playing in 38 games with them.

After retiring as a major league player, Goslin was a player-manager in the minor leagues for one season.

Statistics for Goslin in 18 seasons (1921-1938) in the major leagues include:

  • 14 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 201 in 1925 and 1926
  • 10 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 42 in 1931
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 20 in 1925
  • 3 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 37 in 1930
  • 11 seasons with 100 or more RBIs, with a high of 138 in 1930
  • 11 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .379 in 1928

Career statistics for Goslin include:

  • 2,287 games played
  • 2,735 hits
  • 500 doubles
  • 173 triples
  • 248 home runs
  • 1,609 RBIs
  • .316 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Goose Goslin
ESPN Sports - Goose Goslin


Harmon Killebrew (1984)

Harmon Killebrew started playing baseball as a child and, by the time he entered high school, he displayed superior athletic abilities. In 1954, at the age of only 17, he was signed by the Washington Senators, but he split his time with them in his first few years with time in the minor leagues. From 1954 through 1958, he played in a total of only 113 games with the Senators. In 1959, Killebrew became the Senators starting third baseman. That season he led the American League in home runs and he batted .242 with 132 hits, 20 doubles, 42 home runs, and 105 RBIs in 153 games.

In 1961, the Washington Senators moved to Minnesota and they became the Twins, with Killebrew as their star player. The next year, he led the American League in home runs with 48 and in RBIs with 126. From 1963 through 1967, Killebrew led the league in home runs three times (1963, 1964, 1967).

Killebrew had his greatest success in the later years of his career. In 1969, sixteen years after his first major league at bat, he won the American League MVP award and he led the league in home runs. That season he batted .276 with 153 hits, 49 home runs, and 140 RBIs in 162 games. Two years later, he again led the league in RBIs with 119.

In 1975, Killebrew signed with the Kansas City Royals. In his last season in the major leagues, he batted just .199 in 106 games. He retired at the end of the 1975 season.

Statistics for Killebrew in 16 full seasons (1961-1972, 1974-1975) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 160 in 1966
  • 13 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 49 in 1964 and 1969
  • 9 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 140 in 1969

Career statistics for Killebrew include:

  • 2,435 games played
  • 2,086 hits
  • 290 doubles
  • 573 home runs
  • 1,584 RBIs
  • .256 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Harmon Killebrew
ESPN Sports - Harmon Killebrew


Rod Carew (1991)

Rod Carew had a successful nineteen year baseball career that spanned three decades. Over that time, Carew played for the Minnesota Twins for twelve years and for the California Angels for seven years. He was known as a power hitter, with a career high batting average of .388 in 1977, and as a successful base stealer early in his career, with a high of 49 stolen bases in 1976. In his first year of eligibility for the Baseball Hall of Fame (1991), Carew was voted in with 90.5% on the first ballot.

Carew was drafted by the Minnesota Twins just after graduating from high school and he made his first appearance with the team three years later, in 1967. His first year was a good one, but not nearly as strong as his future years would be. However, he won the American League Rookie of the Year award for batting .292 that year with 22 doubles. The following season, his batting average dropped to .273. Carew, however, broke out in 1969 when he had his first of fifteen consecutive seasons with a batting average over .300.

In 1970, Carew played in only 51 games, giving him 11 full seasons and 1 partial season with the Twins. His statistics for his 11 full seasons in Minnesota include:

  • 10 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 239 in 1977
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 38 in 1977
  • 6 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 49 in 1976
  • 9 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .388 in 1977

Ten years after winning the American League Rookie of the Year award, Carew won the league's MVP award in 1977, with a career high batting average of .388, 239 hits, 38 doubles, 10 triples, and 23 stolen bases.

In 1979, Carew was traded to the California Angels. Although he continued to play well, he never achieved the numbers he had with the Twins. However, Carew still had impressive statistics in his seven years (1979-1985) with the Angels:

  • 3 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 179 in 1980
  • 3 seasons with over 20 doubles, with a high of 34 in 1980
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .339 in 1983

Although Carew won only one MVP award, he won seven American League batting titles and he led both leagues in batting average in 1973, 1974 and 1975.

After the 1985 season, Carew was forced into retirement when no team in major league baseball offered him a contract. He sued MLB owners for collusion and, in 1995, he won the case and was awarded $782,036 in damages.

After retirement, Carew spent time as a hitting coach for the Milwaukee Brewers and the California Angels.

Career statistics for Carew include:

  • 2,469 games played
  • 3,053 hits
  • 445 doubles
  • 353 stolen bases
  • .328 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Rod Carew
ESPN Sports - Rod Carew


Kirby Puckett (2001)

Kirby Puckett started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1982. After two years in the minors, he was called up to the Minnesota Twins in 1984. That season, his first one in the major leagues, Puckett batted .296 with 165 hits in 128 games.

In 1986, Puckett won his first of six Gold Gloves (1986-1989, 1991-1992). That year, as a center fielder, Puckett had 6 errors, 427 putouts, and a .986 fielding percentage in 160 games. His career fielding statistics as a center fielder include:

  • 1,432 games played
  • 42 errors
  • 110 assists
  • 3,853 putouts
  • .990 fielding percentage

Puckett won his first of six Silver Slugger awards (1986-1989,1992, 1994) in 1986. That season he batted .328 with 223 hits, 37 doubles, and 31 home runs. The following year, he won his second Silver Slugger award and he led the American League in hits with 207. In 1987, he batted .332 with 32 doubles, 28 home runs, and 99 RBIs.

The 1988 season was one of Puckett's best. That year he won a third Silver Slugger award and he again led the American League in hits. He had career highs in hits with 234, in RBIs with 121, and in batting average with .356. The next year, he won the American League batting title and a fourth Silver Slugger award. In 1989, Puckett once more led the league in hits and he batted .339 with 215 hits, a career high 45 doubles, and 85 RBIs. Two years later, in 1991, Puckett won the American League Championship Series MVP. In that post-season, he batted .333 with 15 hits, 4 home runs, and 10 RBIs in 12 games.

Puckett was named the All Star Game MVP in 1993, although that was not one of his better seasons. In the next two seasons, 1994 and 1995, his last two seasons in the major leagues, Puckett won two more Silver Slugger awards. Puckett's career was cut short in 1996, at the age of 35, when he lost the vision in one eye from glaucoma. Ten years later, he died from a massive stroke, eight days short of his forty-sixth birthday.

Batting statistics for Puckett in 12 seasons (1984-1995) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 234 in 1988
  • 9 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 45 in 1989
  • 6 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 31 in 1986
  • 3 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 121 in 1988
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .356 in 1988

Career batting statistics for Puckett include:

  • 1,783 games played
  • 2,304 hits
  • 414 doubles
  • 207 home runs
  • 1,085 RBIs
  • .318 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Kirby Puckett
ESPN Sports - Kirby Puckett
Baseball Reference.com - Kirby Puckett


Bert Blylevan (2011)

Bert Blylevan was born in the Netherlands but he was raised in California. He started in major league baseball at an early age, being drafted by the Minnesota Twins right after high school and being called up to the majors at age 19. Blylevan played in the minor leagues for a little over a year before joining the Twins in 1970. That year he pitched 164.0 innings with a 10-9 record, 135 strikeouts to 47 walks, and a 3.18 ERA.

Blylevan was traded by the Twins to the Texas Rangers on June 1, 1976, and he played with them through the 1977 season. In his second and last season with the Rangers, Blylevan pitched his only no hitter. The next year, he moved to the National League to play for the Pittsburgh Pirates for three seasons. In 1981, Blylevan returned to the American League, this time with the Cleveland Indians. However, he was out for most of the 1982 season with an elbow injury. In 1985, he asked to be traded back to the Minnesota Twins.

In 1985, when Blylevan played for two teams (Indians for 23 games and Twins for 14 games), he led the American League in strikeouts with 206. He also led the league in shutouts that year.

The last four years of Blylevan's major league career were with the California Angels (1989-1992). In his first season with the Angels, Blylevan was named the American League Comeback Player of the Year. In 1989, he had a 17-5 record with 131 strikeouts to 44 walks and a 2.73 ERA. His final three seasons were not nearly as good. In 1990, he had a 5.24 ERA, he didn't play at all in 1991 due to an injury, and his ERA in 1992, his final season in the major leagues, was 4.74.

After leaving major league baseball as a player, Blylevan became a commentator for the Minnesota Twins.

Statistics for Blylevan in 22 seasons (1970-1990, 1992) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 258 in 1973
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.0, with a low of 2.52 in 1973

Career statistics for Blylevan include:

  • 692 games played
  • 4,970.0 innings pitched
  • 287-250 win-loss record
  • 3,701 strikeouts to 1,322 walks
  • 3.31 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bert Blylevan
ESPN Sports - Bert Blylevan