Chicago White Sox - Baseball Hall of Fame

Ed Walsh (1946)

Ed Walsh played with the Chicago White Sox from 1904 through 1916. In his first season in the major leagues, he pitched in 18 games and had a 6-3 record with 57 strikeouts to 32 walks and a 2.60 ERA.

Injuries limited his playing time with the White Sox significantly from 1913-1916. He played in 16 games in 1913 and just 11 games total for the following three seasons. The White Sox released him after the 1916 season. He signed with the Boston Braves in 1917 but he was released after just four games.

During his time with the White Sox, Walsh led the American League in ERA twice (1907, 1910) and wins in 1908. He ended his career with an ERA of 1.82, the lowest career ERA in major league baseball history.

Statistics for Walsh in 10 full seasons (1904-1913) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 40 in 1908
  • 5 seasons with over 200 strikeouts, with a high of 269 in 1908
  • 10 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.27 in 1910

Career statistics for Walsh include:

  • 430 games played
  • 2,964.1 innings pitched
  • 195-126 win-loss record
  • 1,736 strikeouts to 617 walks
  • 1.82 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ed Walsh
ESPN Sports - Ed Walsh


Ted Lyons (1955)

Prior to being drafted by the Chicago White Sox, Ted Lyons played baseball at Baylor University. He began his career with the White Sox as a relief pitcher, pitching in just nine games with them in 1923. The following year, he was added to the team's starting rotation, where he remained for the rest of his career. In 1924, his first full season in the major leagues, Lyon pitched in 41 games and he had a 12-11 record with a 4.87 ERA.

In 1925, Lyons led the American League in wins and shutouts. That season he had a 21-11 record with a 3.26 ERA in 43 games. The next season, on August 21, 1926, Lyons pitched a no hitter that lasted just 67 minutes. A year later, he again led the American League in wins with 22.

Lyons led the American League in ERA in 1942. That season he had a 14-6 record with a 2.10 ERA in 20 games. A year later, Lyons was in the United States Marine Corps and he missed the entire 1943 through 1945 seasons. When he returned to the White Sox, he was made their player-manager for 1946, his last season in the major leagues as a player. Lyons pitched in just five games in his final season.

After retiring as a major league player, Lyons continued as the White Sox manager through the 1948 season. His record as manager for three seasons was 185 wins to 245 losses. In 1949, Lyons became a pitching coach for the Detroit Tigers and he held that position for four years. After a year out of major league baseball, Lyons returned in 1954 to serve for one year as a pitching coach for the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Career statistics for Lyons include:

  • 594 games played
  • 4,161 innings pitched
  • 260-230 win-loss record
  • 1,073 strikeouts to 1,121 walks
  • 3.67 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ted Lyons
ESPN Sports - Ted Lyons


Ray Schalk (1955)

Ray Schalk started playing professional baseball in the minor leagues when he was in his late teens. The Chicago White Sox bought his contract in 1912 and he played with the team in 23 games that season. The following season Schalk was made the starting catcher for the White Sox.

In 1924, an injury limited Schalk's playing time to just 57 games but the next season he was back behind the plate, catching in 125 games for the White Sox. From 1927 through 1928, his last season with the White Sox, Schalk was player-manager for the team. His record as manager was 102 wins to 125 losses.

Schalk spent his last season in the major leagues, 1929, with the New York Giants. He served as player-coach for the team and he played in just five games with the Giants before retiring as a player.

In 1930, Schalk was hired as a coach for the Chicago Cubs. After holding that position for two seasons, he left the Cubs to become a manager in the minor leagues. In 1944, Schalk returned to the Cubs as a scout, staying with them for just one season. He then went to Purdue University as a coach and stayed in that position for 18 years.

Schalk was known as an excellent defensive catcher, often leading American League catchers in fielding. Statistics for Schalk as a catcher for 18 seasons in the major leagues include:

  • 1,727 games played
  • 175 errors
  • 1,811 assists
  • 7,168 putouts
  • .981 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Schalk include:

  • 1,762 games played
  • 1,345 hits
  • 199 doubles
  • .253 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ray Schalk
ESPN Sports - Ray Schalk
Baseball Reference.com - Ray Schalk


Luke Appling (1964)

Luke Appling played for 21 years for the Chicago White Sox, starting in 1930 when the team bought his minor league contract. Although Appling was a strong hitter, his fielding at shortstop was no asset to the White Sox. In his lifetime career at that position, Appling made 643 errors.

Appling played in just six games in 1930 and 96 games the following year. In 1932, his first full season in the major leagues, Appling batted .274 with 134 hits and 20 doubles in 139 games. The following season was a much better one for him. In 1933, he batted .322 with 197 hits, 36 doubles, and 85 RBIs.

In 1936, Appling won the American League batting title with a .388 batting average. That season he had 204 hits, 31 doubles, and 128 RBIs in 138 games. He won the batting title again in 1943 with a .328 batting average.

Appling served in the United States military in 1944. When he returned to the White Sox in 1945, he played in only eighteen games. His last full season was 1949, when he batted .301 with 148 hits and 21 doubles in 142 games. The next year, his last one as a major league player, Appling played in just 50 games with the White Sox.

Appling retired as a player after the 1950 season but he remained involved in baseball for over thirty more years. First, he became a minor league manager and, in 1952, he was named Minor League Manager of the Year. He managed in the major leagues for only part of the 1967 season with the Kansas City Athletics. He wasn't successful with the Athletics, ending the season with a 10-30 record. In subsequent years, Appling served as a coach for several teams, including the White Sox. His last position, in the 1980s, was as a batting instructor with the Atlanta Braves.

Career statistics for Appling include:

  • 2,422 games played
  • 2,749 hits
  • 440 doubles
  • 102 triples
  • 1,116 RBIs
  • 179 stolen bases
  • .310 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Luke Appling
ESPN Sports - Luke Appling


Red Faber (1964)

Red Faber played for the Chicago White Sox for 20 years, pitching as both a starter and a reliever. In 1919, the year of the infamous "Black Sox" scandal, Faber had arm problems and he only played in 25 games that year. That injury turned out to be a blessing for Faber, keeping him at a distance from his teammates' downfall.

Faber started in the minor leagues in 1910 and he made his major league debut four years later. In 1914, his first full season in the major leagues, he had a 10-9 record and 2.68 ERA in 40 games. For his first six years with the White Sox, Faber alternated between being a starter and being a relief pitcher. By the 1930s, Faber switched to only pitching in relief.

In 1921, Faber led the American League in ERA with 2.48. That season he had a 25-15 record in 43 games. The following year, he again led the league in ERA, this time with 2.81. In 1922, he had a 21-17 record in 43 games.

Faber played in 42 games in 1932, his last full season in the major leagues. That year he had a 2-11 record with 6 saves and a 3.74 ERA. The next year, his final one as a major league pitcher, Faber played in 36 games, pitching in just 86.1 innings and ending with a 3-4 record, five saves, and a 3.44 ERA.

After retiring as a player, Faber became a coach for the White Sox.

Statistics for Faber in 20 seasons (1914-1933) in the major leagues include:

  • 4 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 25 wins in 1921
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with lows of 1.92 in 1917 in 41 games and 1.23 in 1918 in 11 games

Career statistics for Faber include:

  • 669 games played
  • 4,086.2 innings pitched
  • 254-213 win-loss record
  • 1,471 strikeouts to 1,213 walks
  • 3.15 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Red Faber


Luis Aparicio (1984)

Luis Aparicio was an American League shortstop who played in the major leagues for 18 years, starting with the Chicago White Sox in 1956. Aparicio came from a Venezuelan baseball family and he started his professional career in the Venezuela league. His father, also a shortstop, owned a winter league team in Venezuela. After six years in the Venezuela league, Aparicio was signed by the Chicago White Sox and he made his first appearance with them in 1956.

Aparicio was immediately successful with the White Sox, winning the American League Rookie of the Year award in 1956. Although he played well for Chicago, they traded him to the Baltimore Orioles after the 1962 season. After five years with the Orioles, Aparicio was traded back to the Chicago White Sox, where he stayed for three years. In 1971, he moved to the Boston Red Sox and he finished his last three years in the major leagues with Boston.

Over his 18-year career, Aparicio won 9 Gold Glove awards. From 1956 through 1964, he led the American League in stolen bases. At the time of his retirement in 1973, Aparicio held the record for the most games played by a shortstop. He held that record until it was broken 35 years later by Omar Vizquel.

Career statistics for Aparicio include:

  • 2,599 games played
  • 2,677 hits
  • 394 doubles
  • 506 stolen bases
  • .262 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Luis Aparicio
ESPN Sports - Luis Aparicio


Hoyt Wilhelm (1985)

Hoyt Wilhelm, a knuckleball pitcher, played for nine teams over a twenty-one year career in the major leagues. He spent most of his career as a relief pitcher. He started his major league career in 1956 with the New York Giants. In his first season in the major leagues, Wilhelm had a 15-3 record with 108 strikeouts to 57 walks and a 2.43 ERA in 71 games. He led the National League in ERA that season.

In 1957, Wilhelm played in 40 games with the St. Louis Cardinals before being traded to the Cleveland Indians. A year later, he was traded to the Baltimore Orioles. In 1959, his first full season with the Orioles, Wilhelm led the American League in ERA. That season he had a 2.19 ERA, 15-11 record, and 139 strikeouts to 77 walks in 32 games.

Wilhelm stayed with the Orioles through the 1962 season and then went to the Chicago White Sox for six years (1963-1968). He played in 44 games with the California Angels in 1969 before being traded to the Atlanta Braves. The next year, after 50 games with the Braves, he was traded to the Chicago Cubs but he only played in three games with them. In 1971, he played in just twelve games all season, starting with three games back with the Braves and then moving to the Los Angeles Dodgers for nine games. Wilhelm played in just sixteen games with the Dodgers in 1972, his last season in the major leagues.

Career statistics for Wilhelm include:

  • 1,070 games played
  • 2,254.1 innings pitched
  • 143-122 win-loss record
  • 1,610 strikeouts to 778 walks
  • 2.52 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Hoyt Wilhelm
ESPN Sports - Hoyt Wilhelm


Nellie Fox (1997)

Nellie Fox started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1944. He played in the minors in 1944 and 1945 and then again in 1947 and 1948. He made his first major league appearance in 1947 with the Philadelphia Athletics, playing in just seven games with them that season. He stayed with the Athletics for three years but he played in only a total of 98 major league games during that time.

The Athletics traded Fox to the Chicago White Sox before the 1950 season and that year he finally became a regular player. In 1950, his first full season in the major leagues, Fox batted .241 with 113 hits in 130 games. The next year he batted .313 with 189 hits and 32 doubles in 147 games.

From 1952 through 1958, Fox led the American League in hits four times (1952, 1954, 1957, 1958). His career high came in 1954 with 201 hits. That season he had a career high batting average of .319.

An excellent defensive second baseman, Fox won three Gold Gloves (1957, 1959, 1960). His career fielding statistics at second base include:

  • 2,295 games played
  • 209 errors
  • 6,373 assists
  • 1,619 double plays
  • 6,090 putouts
  • .984 fielding percentage

In 1959, Fox won the American League MVP award. That season he batted .306 with 191 hits, 34 doubles, and 70 RBIs in 156 games. The next year he led the league in triples with 10.

Fox played with the Houston Astros in 1964 and 1965, his last two seasons in the major leagues. In his final season, he played in just 21 games.

After his retirement as a major league player, Fox served as a coach for the Houston Astros (1965-1967) and the Texas Rangers (1968-1972).

Batting statistics for Fox in 15 full seasons (1950-1964) in the major leagues include:

  • 12 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 201 in 1954
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 34 in 1959
  • 4 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 12 in 1951
  • 6 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .319 in 1954

Career batting statistics for Fox include:

  • 2,367 games played
  • 2,663 hits
  • 355 doubles
  • 112 triples
  • .288 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Nellie Fox
ESPN Sports - Nellie Fox
Baseball Reference.com - Nellie Fox


Frank Thomas (2014)

Frank Thomas, who played for most of his career with the Chicago White Sox, was first drafted by the White Sox in 1989. He played in their minor league system for less than two seasons before joining the team for 60 games in 1990.

In 1991, his first full season in the major leagues, Thomas won his first of four Silver Slugger awards, batting .318. He had 178 hits, 31 doubles, 32 home runs, and 109 RBIs in 158 games.

Thomas won his first of two consecutive American League MVP awards in 1993. He also won his second Silver Slugger award, batting .317 with 174 hits, 36 doubles, 41 home runs, and 128 RBIs in 153 games. The next season, he again won the MVP award and a Silver Slugger award. In 1994, he batted a career high .353 with 141 hits, 34 doubles, 38 home runs, and 101 RBIs in 113 games.

In 1997, Thomas led the American League in batting average with .347. That year, he had 184 hits, 35 doubles, 35 home runs, and 125 RBIs in 146 games. From 1990 through 1997, Thomas played defensively at first base. Starting in 1998, he was primarily a designated hitter.

Thomas had a poor season in 1998, batting just .265. In 1999, he had a .305 batting average but his power dropped to just 15 home runs. However, he came back strong in 2000, batting .328 with career highs in hits (191), home runs (43), and RBIs (143). He won the American League Comeback Player of the Year in 2000. That year was his last one with a batting average over .300.

Thomas suffered from injuries in 2004 and 2005 and his game play was limited to just 108 games over those two seasons. In December, 2005, he signed a one-year contract with the Oakland Athletics. A year later, he signed a two-year, $18 million contract with the Toronto Blue Jays.

After 16 games with the Blue Jays in 2008, they released Thomas on April 20, 2008. Four days later, he returned to the Athletics, finishing his major league career with the 2008 season.

Accomplishments for Thomas in nineteen seasons in the major leagues include:

  • won American League MVP award twice: 1993, 1994
  • won four Silver Slugger awards: 1991, 1993, 1994, 2000
  • won American League Comeback Player of the Year award in 2000
  • led American League in batting average in 1997

Statistics for Thomas in 19 seasons (1990-2008) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 191 in 2000
  • 10 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 46 in 1992
  • 13 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 43 in 2000
  • 11 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 143 in 2000
  • 10 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .353 in 1994

Career batting statistics for Thomas include:

  • 2,322 games played
  • 2,468 hits
  • 495 doubles
  • 521 home runs
  • 1,704 RBIs
  • 1,397 strikeouts to 1,667 walks
  • .301 batting average

Career fielding statistics for Thomas at first base include:

  • 971 games played
  • 497 assists
  • 7,910 putouts
  • 776 double plays
  • 80 errors
  • .991 fielding percentage

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Frank Thomas
ESPN Sports - Frank Thomas