NY Yankees - Baseball Hall of Fame

Babe Ruth (1936)

George Herman "Babe" Ruth, perhaps the greatest baseball player ever, had a 25 year career in major league baseball. He ended his career in 1935, leading baseball records for the number of home runs in a season (60) and career home runs (714). Ruth was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936, one year after he retired.

Ruth entered professional baseball in 1914 when Jack Dunn signed him to the Baltimore Orioles, a minor league team at the time. Because of his young age (19) and looks, he was called Dunn's babe and his new name became Babe Ruth to the baseball world. In July, 1914, Ruth was traded to the Boston Red Sox and his major league baseball career began.

Ruth began his career with the Red Sox as a pitcher and, although he had strong numbers as a pitcher, he was switched to the outfield in 1918. He still pitched 20 games that year, ending the season with a 13-7 record and an ERA of 2.22. He also led the American League in home runs with 11. The following year, Ruth hit 29 home runs.

At the end of December, 1919, the Red Sox made a fatal mistake for the team - they sold Ruth to the New York Yankees. In his first year with the Yankees, Ruth had a .376 batting average with 54 home runs. His following season was even better, with a .378 batting average and 59 home runs. Ruth's highest batting average of .393 came in 1923. He continued posting impressive numbers until almost the end of his baseball career.

Ruth was traded by the Yankees to the Boston Braves in 1935. However, Ruth would soon retire as his body gave out and his performance deteriorated. In his last season, Ruth had a .181 batting average with six home runs in 72 at bats. He retired with a career batting average of .342, 714 home runs, 2,217 RBIs, and 2,874 hits in 8,398 at bats.

Statistics for Ruth in 17 full seasons (1918-1934) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with highs of 204 in 1921 and 205 in 1923
  • 7 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with highs of 44 in 1921 and 45 in 1923
  • 16 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 60 in 1927
  • 13 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with highs of 164 in 1927 and 163 in 1931
  • 15 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .393 in 1923

Career statistics for Ruth include:

  • 2,503 games played
  • 2,873 hits
  • 506 doubles
  • 136 triples
  • 714 home runs
  • 2,213 RBIs
  • .342 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Babe Ruth
ESPN Sports - Babe Ruth


Lou Gehrig (1939)

Lou Gehrig, one of baseball's greatest hitters, played for seventeen years for the New York Yankees. One can only imagine the statistics Gehrig might have posted if he had not had a fatal illness at the age of only 35. When his career was tragically ended, he had a .340 batting average with 493 career home runs. In 1939, two years before his death, Gehrig had a streak of 2,130 consecutive games played that was not broken until 1995 when Cal Ripken, Jr. surpassed that number.

Gehrig began his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1921. Two years later, he played his first major league game with the New York Yankees. He spent much of his first two years on the bench, playing primarily as a pinch hitter. In 1925, his first full season in the major leagues, Gehrig batted .295 with 129 hits, 23 doubles, 10 triples, and 20 home runs in 126 games. The next year he led the American League in triples with a career high of 20.

In 1927, Gehrig won the American League MVP award and he led the league in doubles and RBIs. That season he batted .373 with 218 hits, 52 doubles, 18 triples, 47 home runs, and 175 RBIs in 155 games. A year later, he again led the American League in doubles with 47 and RBIs with 142. In 1931, Gehrig led the league in hits with 211, home runs with 46, and RBIs with 184.

Gehrig won the American League Triple Crown in 1934, leading the league in home runs, RBIs, and batting average. That season he batted .363 with 210 hits, 49 home runs, and 165 RBIs in 154 games. Two years later, Gehrig won his second American League MVP award and he again led the league in home runs. In 1936, Gehrig batted .354 with 205 hits, 37 doubles, 49 home runs, and 152 RBIs.

Gehrig was a first baseman for his entire major league career. His career fielding statistics include:

  • 2,137 games played
  • 193 errors
  • 1,087 assists
  • 1,575 double plays
  • 19,510 putouts
  • .991 fielding percentage

Gehrig became ill in 1939 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, now often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease) and he died two years later from the disease.

Batting statistics for Gehrig in 14 full seasons (1925-1938) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 220 in 1930
  • 12 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 52 in 1927
  • 10 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 20 in 1926
  • 13 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 49 in 1934 and 1936
  • 13 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 184 in 1931

Career batting statistics for Gehrig include:

  • 2,164 games played
  • 2,721 hits
  • 534 doubles
  • 163 triples
  • 493 home runs
  • 1,995 RBIs
  • .340 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Lou Gehrig
ESPN Sports - Lou Gehrig
Baseball Reference.com - Lou Gehrig


Willie Keeler (1939)

Willie Keeler, nicknamed "Wee Willie" because of his height (5'4-1/2"), started his major league baseball career with the New York Giants in 1892. He stayed with the Giants for two seasons but he played in only 14 games in 1892 and 27 games in his second season before being traded to the Brooklyn Grooms/Dodgers.

After the 1893 season, Keeler joined the Baltimore Orioles of the National League, a team that folded in 1899. In his first full season in the major leagues (1894), Keeler batted .371 with 219 hits, 27 doubles, 22 triples, and 94 RBIs in 129 games. While with the Orioles, Keeler won the National League batting title in 1897 with a .424 batting average in and 1898 with a .385 batting average. He also led the league in hits in 1897 and 1898.

In 1899, Keeler returned to the Dodgers (then called the Brooklyn Superbas). He continued with the Dodgers through the 1902 season, leading the National League again in hits in 1900.

Keeler moved to the New York Highlanders/Yankees and the American League in 1903. He stayed with the team through 1909 but he was only a part-time player in his last two seasons, playing in 91 games in 1908 and in 99 games in 1909. He returned to the Giants for his last season (1910), playing in just 19 games that season.

Keeler played in over 100 games in each of 14 seasons (1894-1907). His statistics during that time include:

  • 8 seasons with over 200 hits, with a high of 239 in 1897
  • 7 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 22 in 1894
  • 11 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 67 in 1896
  • 13 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .424 in 1897

Career statistics for Keeler include:

  • 2,123 games played
  • 2,932 hits
  • 146 triples
  • 495 stolen bases
  • .341 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Willie Keeler
ESPN Sports - Willie Keeler


Jack Chesbro (1946)

Jack Chesbro started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1895. After more than four years in the minors, his contract was sold to the Pittsburgh Pirates. In his first year in the major leagues (1899), he played in 19 games, pitching 149.0 innings and having a 6-9 record with 28 strikeouts to 59 walks and an ERA of 4.11.

In December, 1899, Chesbro was traded to the Louisville Colonels of the National League but the team folded and Chesbro was sent back to the Pirates. He stayed with the Pirates through the 1902 season, leading the National League in wins in his last season in Pittsburgh.

In 1903, Chesbro signed with the New York Highlanders/Yankees. He played with the team for over eight seasons. His best season was in 1904 when he pitched 454.2 innings with a 41-12 record, 239 strikeouts to 88 walks, and a 1.82 ERA in 55 games. That season he led the American League in wins.

In his last season, 1909, Chesbro was released by the Yankees and claimed off waivers by the Boston Red Sox. He pitched in just ten games in his last season, nine with the Yankees and one with Boston.

After retiring as a major league player, Chesbro pitched and coached for semi-professional teams in 1910 and 1911. In 1924, he was a coach for the Washington Senators. Three years later, he was a manager and pitcher in the minor leagues.

Statistics for Chesbro in 11 seasons (1899-1909) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 41 in 1904
  • 3 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 239 in 1904
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 1.82 in 1904

Career statistics for Chesbro include:

  • 392 games played
  • 2,896.2 innings pitched
  • 198-132 win-loss record
  • 1,265 strikeouts to 690 walks
  • 2.68 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jack Chesbro
ESPN Sports - Jack Chesbro


Herb Pennock (1948)

Herb Pennock played first base while in school but later switched to pitching. In 1912, Connie Mack signed him to a contract with the Philadelphia Athletics. He played in 17 games that season for the Athletics. The following season he became ill and played in just 33.1 innings in 14 games.

During the 1915 season, Mack sold Pennock's contract to the Boston Red Sox. While with the Red Sox, Pennock spent much of his time playing in the International League, playing in just five games with Boston in 1915 and nine games in 1916. He played in 24 games in 1917 but the following season he joined the navy. He returned to the Red Sox in 1919 and pitched for them through the 1922 season.

Pennock was traded to the New York Yankees after the 1922 season. He pitched for the Yankees as a starter through the 1932 season but in 1933, he was used as a relief pitcher. In 1934, he signed again with the Red Sox and spent his last season in the major leagues as a relief pitcher.

After retiring as a major league player, Pennock worked as a general manager of a minor league team. From 1936 through 1938, he rejoined the Red Sox as a coach. The following two years, he worked in administrative roles in the minor leagues. His last position was in 1943 as general manager of the Philadelphia Phillies. Five years later, he died at age 53 of a cerebral hemorrhage.

Career statistics for Pennock include:

  • 617 games played
  • 3,571.2 innings pitched
  • 240-162 win-loss record
  • 1,227 strikeouts to 916 walks
  • 3.60 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Herb Pennock
ESPN Sports - Herb Pennock


Bill Dickey (1954)

Bill Dickey came from a baseball family, with both his father and a brother having played semi-pro baseball. One of his brothers was also a catcher in the major leagues. Although Dickey was a catcher for most of his career, he started as a pitcher and second baseman when he played baseball in high school. In college, he was a pitcher.

Dickey started his professional career in the minor leagues in 1925 at the age of 18. He played in the minors for three years before his contract was purchased by the New York Yankees in 1928. He played most of that season in the minors, being called up for just 10 games with the Yankees. The following season, his first full season in the major leagues, Dickey batted .324 with 145 hits, 30 doubles, 10 home runs, and 65 RBIs in 130 games.

Dickey played his entire career with the Yankees (1928-1943, 1946). His best season was 1937 when he batted .332 with 176 hits, 35 doubles, 29 home runs, and 133 RBIs in 140 games. He had limited playing time in 1942 and 1943, playing in 82 games in 1942 and 85 games the following season. He spent 1944 and 1945 in the US Navy. When Dickey returned to the Yankees in 1946, they made him player-manager in the middle of the season. He played in just 54 games in his last season in the major leagues.

In 1947, Dickey managed a team in the minor leagues. Two years later, he was back with the Yankees as a coach and mentor to Yogi Berra.

Dickey played in over 100 games in each of 13 seasons (1929-1941). His statistics during that time include:

  • 4 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 176 in 1937
  • 4 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 29 in 1937
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 133 in 1937
  • 10 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .362 in 1936

Career statistics for Dickey include:

  • 1,789 games played
  • 1,969 hits
  • 343 doubles
  • 202 home runs
  • 1,209 RBIs
  • .313 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bill Dickey
ESPN Sports - Bill Dickey


Joe DiMaggio (1955)

Joe DiMaggio came from a baseball family, with two brothers, Vince and Dom, who also played in the major leagues. However, they did not have the stellar career that Joe did. DiMaggio started his professional career in the minor leagues in 1933. His contract was purchased by the New York Yankees and he first played with them in 1936. That season, DiMaggio batted .323, with 206 hits, 44 doubles, 15 triples, 29 home runs, and 125 RBIs in 138 games.

DiMaggio played his entire major league career with the Yankees (1936-1942, 1946-1951). His best season was probably his second one (1937) when he had 215 hits, 15 triples, 46 home runs, and 167 RBIs. Two years later, DiMaggio won his first of three American League MVP awards, his second and third coming in 1941 and 1947. In 1941, DiMaggio hit in 56 straight games, a major league baseball record that still stands as the longest hitting streak in major league baseball.

From 1943-1945, DiMaggio served in the US army, where he continued to play baseball. He returned to the Yankees in 1946 and the following season won his third AL MVP award. DiMaggio retired after the 1951 season in which he batted .263 with 109 hits and 22 doubles in 116 games.

After retiring as a major league player, DiMaggio returned to the Yankees as a batting coach. In the 1970s, he became a celebrity of a different kind when he was the spokesman for Mr. Coffee coffee makers.

Statistics for DiMaggio in 13 seasons (1936-1942, 1946-1951) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 215 in 1937
  • 7 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 44 in 1936
  • 8 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 15 in 1936 and 1937
  • 11 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 46 in 1937
  • 9 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 167 in 1937
  • 11 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .381 in 1939

Career statistics for DiMaggio include:

  • 1,736 games played
  • 2,214 hits
  • 389 doubles
  • 131 triples
  • 361 home runs
  • 1,537 RBIs
  • .325 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe DiMaggio
ESPN Sports - Joe DiMaggio


Red Ruffing (1967)

Red Ruffing started his major league career with the Boston Red Sox in 1924. He played in just eight games with the Red Sox that season. He stayed with the Red Sox for six and a half years but he was not successful in his time with them. In 189 games, he had a 39-96 record and only one season with an ERA under 4.00 (3.89 in 1928). The Red Sox traded him to the New York Yankees in the middle of the 1930 season.

Ruffing struggled in his first full season with the Yankees (1931), playing in 34 games with a 16-14 record, 132 strikeouts to 87 walks, and an ERA of 4.41. However, the following season, Ruffing had 190 strikeouts, the only time in his major league career that he struck out more than 150 batters in one season.

Ruffing became a star pitcher for the Yankees from 1936 to 1939 when he won 20 or more games each season. His best season was perhaps 1937 when he had a 20-7 record, 131 strikeouts to 68 walks, and a 2.98 ERA in 31 games.

In 1943 and 1944, Ruffing served in the US military. He returned to the Yankees in 1945 but played in only eight games with them in 1946, his last season as a Yankee. The following season, his last in the major leagues, Ruffing played in nine games with the Chicago White Sox.

After retiring as a major league player, Ruffing worked as an instructor and coach for the Cleveland Indians. He also held an executive position with them for awhile. Afterwards, he was a coach and scout for the New York Mets.

Career statistics for Ruffing include:

  • 624 games played
  • 4,344.0 innings pitched
  • 273-225 win-loss record
  • 1,987 strikeouts to 1,541 walks
  • 3.80 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Red Ruffing
ESPN Sports - Red Ruffing


Waite Hoyt (1969)

Waite Hoyt pitched in the major leagues for seven teams over a period of 21 years. He was signed by the New York Giants at the very young age of 15, but he didn't make his first start until age 18 in 1918. His initial years were spent in the minors for the Giants. After just one game with the Giants in 1918, Hoyt was sent back to the minors.

Hoyt's contract was bought by the Boston Red Sox in 1919 and he played for two years with them. In his first season with the Red Sox, Hoyt played in 13 games and had a 4-6 record with a 3.25 ERA.

After the 1920 season, the New York Yankees acquired Hoyt. In 1921, he pitched in 43 games and had a 19-13 record with a 3.09 ERA. Six years later, in 1927, he led the American League in wins with 22. The next season he led the league in saves with eight.

In 1930, after playing in only eight games for the Yankees, he was traded to the Detroit Tigers. Hoyt stayed with the Tigers until the middle of 1931, when he was traded to the Philadelphia Athletics. The following year, Hoyt found himself with the Brooklyn Dodgers for eight games and with the rival New York Giants for 18 games.

From 1933 through 1937, the last years of his major league career, Hoyt was with the Pittsburgh Pirates. In his first season with the Pirates, he pitched in 36 games and had a 5-7 record and a 2.92 ERA. The Pirates traded Hoyt back to the Dodgers in 1937. He ended his major league baseball career with six games with the Dodgers in 1938.

In addition to being an accomplished pitcher, Hoyt had other talents. He was an accomplished artist, writer, semi-pro basketball player, and performer who appeared in vaudeville shows.

After retiring as a player, Hoyt had a long career as a broadcaster. He started broadcasting in 1940 for the Dodgers, but in 1942, left that position to become the broadcaster for the Cincinnati Reds, a position he held until 1965. In 1961, he was a broadcaster for the World Series on NBC.

Career statistics for Hoyt include:

  • 674 games played
  • 3,762.1 innings pitched
  • 237-182 win-loss record
  • 1,206 strikeouts to 1,003 walks
  • 3.59 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Waite Hoyt
ESPN Sports - Waite Hoyt


Earl Combs (1970)

Earl Combs started his professional life as a school teacher, playing baseball in his spare time. Later, he started playing semi-pro baseball. In 1922, he signed with the Louisville Colonels of the American Association and he played for the team for two seasons, batting .344 in 1922 and .380 in 1923.

In 1924, the New York Yankees bought Combs contract and he played with them from 1924 through 1935. In his first season with the Yankees, he played in only 24 games due to a broken ankle that kept him on the disabled list for most of the season. The following season, he batted .342 with 203 hits, 36 doubles, 13 triples, and 12 stolen bases.

Combs suffered serious injuries on the playing field in 1934 and 1935, limiting his play in his last two seasons. After playing in 63 games in 1934 and 89 games in 1935, Combs retired.

After retiring as a major league player, Combs returned to the Yankees as a coach. Later in his life, he was Kentucky's State Banking Commissioner (1955-1959).

Combs played in over 100 games in each of 9 seasons (1925-1933). His statistics during that time include:

  • 8 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 231 in 1927
  • 8 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 36 in 1925 and 1927
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with highs of 21 in 1928, 22 in 1930, and 23 in 1927
  • 8 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .356 in 1927

Career statistics for Combs include:

  • 1,455 games played
  • 1,866 hits
  • 309 doubles
  • 154 triples
  • .325 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Earl Combs
ESPN Sports - Earl Combs


Yogi Berra (1972)

Yogi Berra started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues, playing there prior to World War II. During the war, he served in the US Navy. In 1946, he played primarily in the minor leagues, playing in just seven games with the New York Yankees. The following season, he played in 83 games and batted .280 with 82 hits, 15 doubles, 11 home runs, and 54 RBIs.

In his first full season with the Yankees (1948), Berra batted .305 with 143 hits, 24 doubles, 10 triples, 14 home runs, and 98 RBIs in 125 games. The following season, he led the American League in RBIs, a feat he repeated six more times for a total of seven consecutive seasons (1949-1955). During those seven seasons, Berra won the American League MVP award three times (1951, 1954, 1955). His best season was perhaps 1950, when he batted .322 with 192 hits, 30 doubles, 28 home runs, and 124 RBIs in 151 games.

Berra played with the Yankees through the 1963 season. The following season, he was made manager of the Yankees but he only lasted a year in the position. In 1965, his last season as a player, Berra joined the New York Mets as a player-manager. However, he only played in four games with the Mets that season.

After retiring as a major league player, Berra started a long second career as a major league coach and manager. He stayed with the Mets as a coach from 1965-1972. In 1972, he again became their manager, staying in that position through the 1975 season. After being fired as manager in August, 1975, Berra stayed out of baseball until the following season when he returned to the Yankees, this time as a coach. After coaching with the Yankees for eight seasons, Berra was made manager in 1984. He was fired early in the 1985 season by George Steinbrenner, leading to a feud that kept Berra away from the Yankees until Steinbrenner apologized in 2000.

Berra's accomplishments as a manager in seven seasons (1964, 1972-1975, 1984-1985) include:

  • 484-444 win-loss record
  • American League pennant in 1964 with the New York Yankees
  • National League pennant in 1973 with the New York Mets

In 1986, Berra took a coaching position with the Houston Astros and he remained in that job through 1989. After resolving his differences with Steinbrenner in 2000, Berra was a regular fixture at Yankees spring training games through the 2012 season.

In addition to his hitting prowess, Berra was an outstanding fielder. His fielding statistics as a catcher include:

  • 1,699 games played
  • 110 errors
  • 798 assists
  • 8,738 putouts
  • .989 fielding percentage

Berra played in over 100 games in each of 14 seasons (1948-1961). His batting statistics during that time include:

  • 4 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 192 in 1950
  • 11 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 30 in 1952 and 1956
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with highs of 124 in 1950 and 125 in 1954
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .322 in 1950

Career batting statistics for Berra include:

  • 2,120 games played
  • 2,150 hits
  • 321 doubles
  • 358 home runs
  • 1,430 RBIs
  • .285 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Yogi Berra
ESPN Sports - Yogi Berra
Baseball Reference.com - Yogi Berra


Lefty Gomez (1972)

Lefty Gomez started his major league baseball career in 1930, pitching in 15 games with the New York Yankees. The following season, his first full season in the major leagues, Gomez pitched 243.0 innings in 40 games with a 21-9 record, 150 strikeouts to 85 walks, and a 2.67 ERA. Two years later, he was the winning pitcher and drove in the winning run in the first major league All Star game.

Gomez played with the Yankees through the 1942 season. His two best seasons were 1934 and 1937, when he won the American League Triple Crown for pitchers and led the league in wins, ERA, shutouts, and strikeouts. In 1934, he pitched 281.2 innings in 38 games, with a 26-5 record, 158 strikeouts to 96 walks, and a 2.33 ERA. His numbers for 1937 were comparable: 278.1 innings pitched, 21-11 record, 194 strikeouts to 93 walks, and 2.33 ERA in 34 games.

In 1940, Gomez suffered an arm injury and he played in just nine games that season. Two and a half years later, in January, 1943, the Yankees sold his contract to the Boston Braves. The Braves, however, released him before the 1944 season. He then signed with the Washington Senators but played in only one game with them before retiring from major league baseball.

Statistics for Gomez in 13 seasons with the New York Yankees (1930-1942) include:

  • 4 seasons with over 20 wins, with a high of 26 in 1934
  • 5 seasons with 150 or more strikeouts, with a high of 194 in 1937
  • 3 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.33 in 1934 and 1937

Career statistics for Gomez include:

  • 368 games played
  • 2,503.0 innings pitched
  • 189-102 win-loss record
  • 1,468 strikeouts to 1,095 walks
  • 3.34 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Lefty Gomez
ESPN Sports - Lefty Gomez


Whitey Ford (1974)

Whitey Ford was signed by the New York Yankees in 1947, but he did not take his place on the mound for the Yankees until 1950, playing first in the minor leagues. He had a strong first year, winning nine games and finishing with a 2.81 ERA in 20 games. However, Ford only played for a year and then spent the next season in the United States army, serving in the Korean War. Ford returned to the Yankees in time for the 1953 season.

In 1955, Ford led the American League in wins with an 18-7 record. A year later, he led the league in ERA with 2.47. In 1958, he again led the league in ERA and he led in shutouts. That season he had a 14-7 record with 145 strikeouts to 62 walks and a 2.01 ERA in 30 games.

Ford won the American League Cy Young award in 1961 and he led the league in wins for the second time. That season he had career highs in wins with 25 and strikeouts with 209. He ended the regular season with a 3.21 ERA. Ford also won the World Series MVP award in 1961 for his performance in the post-season. He won both games that he pitched and he gave up six hits, no runs, and one walk. Two years later, in 1963, Ford again led the American League in wins with 24.

In 1965, Ford's last full season in the major leagues, he pitched in 37 games and ended the season with a 16-13 record and a 3.24 ERA. He had limited play in his last two seasons, pitching in 73.0 innings in 1966 and in 44.0 innings in 1967.

Statistics for Ford in 13 full seasons (1953-1965) in the major leagues include:

  • 5 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 209 in 1961
  • 8 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.01 in 1958

Career statistics for Ford include:

  • 498 games played
  • 3,170.1 innings pitched
  • 236-106 win-loss record
  • 1,956 strikeouts to 1,086 walks
  • 2.75 ERA

Source for Information
Wikipedia - Whitey Ford
ESPN Sports - Whitey Ford


Mickey Mantle (1974)

Mickey Mantle was a member of the powerhouse New York Yankees of the 1950s and early 1960s and he played in seven World Series with them. He was signed by the Yankees in 1949 and he spent his first two seasons with them in the minor leagues. He first appeared in a Yankees uniform in 1951, playing in 96 games that season. He struggled in his early at-bats with the Yankees and was sent back to the minor leagues for a short time. He finished the 1951 season with a batting average of .267, 13 home runs, and 65 RBIs.

In 1955, Mantle led the American League in triples with 11 and in home runs with 37. The next year, he won his first of three American League MVP awards. He also won the Triple Crown, leading the league in home runs, RBIs, and batting average. In 1956, Mantle batted .353 with 188 hits, 22 doubles, 52 home runs, and 130 RBIs in 150 games.

Mantle won his second MVP award in 1957. That season he batted .365 with 173 hits, 28 doubles, 34 home runs, 94 RBIs, and 16 stolen bases in 144 games. The following season he led the American League in home runs for the third time with 42. Mantle led the league in home runs one more time, in 1960 with 40.

In 1962, Mantle won his third and last MVP award, batting .321 with 121 hits, 30 home runs, and 89 RBIs in 123 games. That season he also won a Gold Glove for his defensive play in center field. Career fielding statistics for Mantle as a center fielder include:

  • 1,742 games played
  • 67 errors
  • 4,022 putouts
  • .984 fielding percentage

Mantle played with the Yankees through the 1968 season. In his last season in the major leagues, Mantle batted .237 with 103 hits and 18 home runs in 144 games.

Batting statistics for Mantle in 18 seasons (1951-1968) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 188 in 1956
  • 14 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 54 in 1961
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 130 in 1956
  • 10 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .365 in 1957

Career batting statistics for Mantle include:

  • 2,401 games played
  • 2,415 hits
  • 344 doubles
  • 536 home runs
  • 1,509 RBIs
  • 153 stolen bases
  • .298 batting average

Source for Information
Wikipedia - Mickey Mantle
ESPN Sports - Mickey Mantle
Baseball Reference.com - Mickey Mantle


Tony Lazzeri (1991)

Tony Lazzeri played semi-pro baseball as a teenager and he started playing in the minor leagues in 1922 at the age of 18. After three years in the minors, he was signed by the New York Yankees and started playing with them in 1926. In his rookie year, Lazzeri batted .275 with 162 hits, 28 doubles, 14 triples, 18 home runs, 114 RBIs, and 16 stolen bases in 155 games.

Lazzeri played with the Yankees for 12 seasons. His best season was probably 1929 when he batted .354 with 193 hits and 37 doubles. He was released by the Yankees after the 1937 season and he signed with the Chicago Cubs as player-coach. That relationship lasted just one season and in 1939, after being released by the Cubs, Lazzeri signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers. After just 14 games, the Dodgers released him and he signed with the third New York team, the Giants. He played in only 13 games with the Giants when they, too, released him, ending his major league career as a player.

From 1939 through 1940, Lazzeri was a minor league team manager. The following season, he played in the minor leagues and then for two years, played and managed in the minors. In 1946, Lazzeri, who was an epileptic, fell as a result of either a heart attack or seizure and he died from the fall at the age of only 42.

Lazzeri played in over 100 games in each of 12 seasons (1926-1937). His statistics during that time include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 193 in 1929
  • 3 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 37 in 1929
  • 6 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 16 in 1932
  • 7 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 121 in 1930
  • 5 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .354 in 1929

Career statistics for Lazzeri include:

  • 1,740 games played
  • 1,840 hits
  • 334 doubles
  • 115 triples
  • 178 home runs
  • 1,191 RBIs
  • 148 stolen bases
  • .292 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Tony Lazzeri
ESPN Sports - Tony Lazzeri


Reggie Jackson (1993)

Reggie Jackson, who played well for nine full seasons with the Oakland A's, also had successful five year stints with the New York Yankees and with the California Angels and one good year, in the middle of his career, with the Baltimore Orioles. Jackson was nicknamed "Mister October" because of all the off-season games in which he played. He had the good fortune to play with five World Series winners - three times with the Oakland A's (1972-1974) and twice with the New York Yankees (1977, 1978).

Jackson, the son of a professional baseball player, was drafted in 1966 by the Kansas City Athletics. One year later, he made his first appearance with the team. He played in only 35 games with the Athletics in 1967, spending the rest of the season in the minor leagues. The next year, he had his first full season in the major leagues and he batted .250 with 138 hits and 29 home runs in 154 games.

In 1973, Jackson won the American League MVP award and he led the league in home runs and RBIs. That season he batted .293 with 158 hits, 28 doubles, 32 home runs, 117 RBIs, and 22 stolen bases in 151 games. In the 1973 post-season, Jackson won the World Series MVP award. He played in 12 games and had 12 hits, 3 doubles, one home run, and 6 RBIs.

Jackson led the American League in home runs with 36 in 1975. Although he played well with the Athletics, they traded him after the season ended to the Baltimore Orioles. He stayed with the Orioles for just one season before becoming a free agent. In 1977, he signed a five-year contract with the New York Yankees.

In 1977, Jackson won his second World Series MVP award. That post-season he played in 11 games and had 11 hits, 5 home runs, 9 RBIs, and a .306 batting average.

Jackson won his first Silver Slugger award in 1980. That season he led the American League in home runs with 41 and he batted .300 with 154 hits, 22 doubles, and 111 RBIs.

Jackson became a free agent again after the 1981 season and he signed a five-year contract with the California Angels. He played well in his first year with the Angels, hitting 39 home runs and driving in 101 runs. Jackson won his second Silver Slugger award in 1982.

In 1987, Jackson returned to the Athletics to play for one more season. In his final year in the major leagues, Jackson played in 115 games and he batted .220.

Statistics for Jackson in 21 seasons (1967-1987) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 158 in 1973
  • 16 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 47 in 1969
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with highs of 118 in 1969 and 117 in 1973
  • 4 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 28 in 1976

Career statistics for Jackson include:

  • 2,820 games played
  • 2,584 hits
  • 463 doubles
  • 563 home runs
  • 1,702 RBIs
  • 228 stolen bases
  • .262 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Reggie Jackson
ESPN Sports - Reggie Jackson


Phil Rizzuto (1994)

Phil Rizzuto was a shortstop with the New York Yankees for thirteen years. In high school, Rizzuto played both baseball and football. The Yankees signed him in 1937 at the age of 20 but he didn't play with the team until 1941. He spent his first three years in the minor leagues where he distinguished himself in 1940 as the Minor League Player of the Year. In 1941, he joined the New York Yankees. Rizzuto batted .307 with 158 hits, 20 doubles, and 14 stolen bases in his first season with the Yankees.

In 1943, Rizzuto joined the United States Navy and he served in World War II through 1945. He returned to the Yankees in 1946, playing in 126 games with them that season. Three years later, in 1950, Rizzuto won the American League MVP award. That season he batted .324 with 200 hits and 36 doubles in 155 games.

Rizzuto played with the Yankees until they released him in August, 1956. In his last two seasons in the major leagues, Rizzuto had limited playing time. He played in 81 games in 1955 and 31 games in 1956.

Rizzuto had a long and successful second career as a baseball broadcaster for the New York Yankees, starting in 1957. He worked on radio and TV for 40 years.

Career statistics for Rizzuto include:

  • 1,661 games played
  • 1,588 hits
  • 239 doubles
  • 149 stolen bases
  • .273 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Phil Rizzuto
ESPN Sports - Phil Rizzuto


Rich "Goose" Gossage (2008)

Rich "Goose" Gossage began his professional baseball career as a starting pitcher but he soon became a relief pitcher. In a 22-year career in the major leagues, he played for nine teams, starting with the Chicago White Sox in 1972. In his first season, he pitched in 36 games and had a 7-1 record with 2 saves, 57 strikeouts to 44 walks, and a 4.28 ERA.

Gossage was one of the best relief pitchers, leading the American League in saves three times (1975 with 26 saves, 1978 with 27 saves, and 1980 with 33 saves). One of his best seasons was 1975 when he had a 9-8 record with 26 saves, 130 strikeouts to 70 walks, and a 1.84 ERA in 142.0 innings pitched in 62 games.

After the 1976 season, Gossage signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates for a season. He then moved to the New York Yankees, a team he would stay with for six seasons. In 1984, he moved back to the National League, signing with the San Diego Padres. After four seasons with the Padres, Gossage played with the Chicago Cubs in 1988 and the San Francisco Giants and the Yankees in 1989.

In 1990, Gossage played for a year in Japan. When he returned to the US in 1991, he signed with the Texas Rangers. The following two seasons, he pitched for the Oakland Athletics and in 1994, he finished his major league career with the Seattle Mariners.

Statistics for Gossage in 22 seasons (1972-1989, 1991-1994) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 20 saves, with a high of 33 in 1980
  • 12 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with lows of 0.77 in 1981 in 32 games and 1.62 in 1977 in 72 games

Career statistics for Gossage include:

  • 1,002 games played
  • 1,809.1 innings pitched
  • 310 saves
  • 1,502 strikeouts to 732 walks
  • 3.01 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Rich "Goose" Gossage
ESPN Sports - Rich "Goose" Gossage


Joe Gordon (2009)

Joe Gordon started his professional baseball career in 1936 after signing with the New York Yankees. He played in the minor leagues for two seasons and joined the Yankees in 1938 as their full-time second baseman. In his first season in the major leagues, Gordon batted .255 with 117 hits, 24 doubles, 25 home runs, and 97 RBIs in 127 games.

In 1942, Gordon won the American League MVP award. That season he batted .322 with 173 hits, 29 doubles, 18 home runs, and 103 RBIs in 147 games. Two years later, Gordon was out of baseball for two seasons, serving in the US army from 1944 through 1945. When he returned to the Yankees in 1946, he played in 112 games, missing part of the season due to injuries. He batted only .210 that season and in October, 1946, the Yankees traded him to the Cleveland Indians.

Gordon recovered from his injuries and in 1947, his first season with the Indians, he batted .272 with 153 hits, 27 doubles, 29 home runs, and 93 RBIs in 155 games. He continued to play with the Indians through the 1950 season.

Gordon was the first American League second baseman to hit 20 home runs in a season and he holds the major league record for the most career home runs by a second baseman. In addition to being a power hitter, Gordon was an excellent fielder and he led the American League in assists four times and defensive double plays three times. His career fielding statistics as a second baseman include:

  • 1,519 games played
  • 260 errors
  • 4,706 assists
  • 1,160 double plays
  • 3,600 putouts
  • .970 fielding percentage

After retiring as a major league player, Gordon was a player-manager in the minor leagues in 1951 and 1952. The following year, he returned to the major leagues as a scout for the Detroit Tigers. He stayed in that position through 1956 and then once again took a managerial position in the minor leagues.

In 1958, Gordon was hired as the manager of the Cleveland Indians. He was traded to the Detroit Tigers in the middle of the 1960 season, finishing the season as the Tigers new manager. In 1961, he was hired as manager of the Kansas City Athletics but he was fired halfway through the season by Charlie Finley, the owner of the Athletics. Following his firing, Gordon signed on with the Los Angeles Angels as a scout and minor league instructor. He stayed in that position through 1968. Gordon's last year in major league baseball was as manager of the Kansas City Royals in 1969. His statistics as a manager include 615 games managed, 305-308 win-loss record, and .498 win percentage.

Batting statistics for Gordon in 11 seasons (1938-1943, 1946-1950) in the major leagues include:

  • 6 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 173 in 1940 and 1942
  • 7 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 32 in 1948
  • 4 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 124 in 1948

Career batting statistics for Gordon include:

  • 1,566 games played
  • 1,530 hits
  • 264 doubles
  • 253 home runs
  • 975 RBIs
  • .268 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe Gordon
ESPN Sports - Joe Gordon
Baseball Reference.com - Joe Gordon