Boston Red Sox - Baseball Hall of Fame

Jimmy Collins (1945)

Jimmy Collins started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1893 as a shortstop. The next year, he played in the outfield. After the 1894 season, his contract was bought by the Boston Beaneaters/Braves and a year later, he played in right field for them. Collins was transferred to the Louisville Colonels of the National League in 1885 but he played with them for less than one season before returning to the Beaneaters/Braves.

In 1897, Collins had a career high batting average of .346 and a career high 132 RBIs. The next season, he led the National League in home runs with 15. That season he batted .328 with 196 hits, 35 doubles, and 111 RBIs.

After the 1900 season, Collins left the Beaneaters/Braves and moved to the American League and the Boston Americans/Red Sox to become player-manager of the team. In his first season with the Red Sox, Collins batted .332 with 187 hits, 42 doubles, 16 triples, and 94 RBIs.

Collins was replaced as manager of the Red Sox in 1906 after 37 games but he continued to play with the team until he was traded the following season to the Philadelphia Athletics. Collins retired as a major league player after the 1908 season but he continued to play and manage in the minor leagues from 1909 through 1911.

Statistics for Collins in 14 seasons (1895-1908) in the major leagues include:

  • 7 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 196 in 1898
  • 4 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 42 in 1901
  • 6 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 17 in 1903
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .346 in 1897

Career statistics for Collins include:

  • 1,725 games played
  • 352 doubles
  • 116 triples
  • 983 RBIs
  • 194 stolen bases
  • .294 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jimmy Collins
ESPN Sports - Jimmy Collins


Lefty Grove (1947)

Lefty Grove started his professional baseball career in the Baltimore Orioles' minor leagues in 1920. His contract was sold to the Philadelphia Athletics in 1925 for $100,500, the highest amount paid for a player at that time. In his first season with the Athletics, Grove led the American League in strikeouts. In 1925, he pitched in 45 games and had a 10-12 record with 116 strikeouts to 131 walks and a 4.75 ERA. The next season, he led the league in strikeouts and in ERA, ending the season with a 13-13 record with 194 strikeouts to 101 walks and an ERA of 2.51.

In 1928, Grove led the American League in strikeouts for the fourth consecutive year and in wins for the first time. He would go on to lead the league in wins three more times (1930, 1931, 1933) and in strikeouts three more times (1929-1931). The next season, he led the league in ERA for the second time and he would continue to do so for the next three seasons (1930-1932).

Grove won the American League Triple Crown in 1930. That season he had a 28-5 record with a career high of 209 strikeouts and a 2.54 ERA. A year later, he won the American League MVP award and a second Triple Crown, leading the league with 31 wins, 175 strikeouts, and a 2.06 ERA.

In 1932, Grove led the American League in ERA with 2.84. The next season, his last one with the Athletics, he led the league in wins with 24. At the end of the 1933 season, the Athletics traded him to the Boston Red Sox. He had a poor showing in his first season with the Red Sox, ending with an 8-8 record, 43 strikeouts to 32 walks, and a 6.50 ERA. However, in 1935, he redeemed himself, leading the league once more in ERA. Over the next three seasons, he would be the American League leader in ERA two more times (1938, 1939). He ended his major league career after pitching in 21 games for the Red Sox in 1941.

Statistics for Grove in 17 seasons (1925-1941) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with 20 or more wins, with a high of 31 in 1931
  • 8 seasons with over 150 strikeouts, with a high of 209 in 1930
  • 9 seasons with an ERA under 3.00, with a low of 2.06 in 1931

Career statistics for Grove include:

  • 616 games played
  • 3,940.2 innings pitched
  • 300-141 win-loss record
  • 2,266 strikeouts to 1,187 walks
  • 3.06 ERA

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Lefty Grove
ESPN Sports - Lefty Grove


Jimmie Foxx (1951)

Jimmie Foxx played major league baseball for four teams over a twenty-year period, beginning in 1925 with the Philadelphia Athletics. He started at the age of seventeen and played at various positions (catcher, first baseman, outfielder) in his early years. In 1929, the Athletics made him their regular starting first baseman.

Foxx played in the minor leagues in 1924 and most of 1925. He joined the Athletics for ten games in 1925. The following two seasons, he had just limited playing time with the Athletics, batting in just 26 games in 1926 and 61 games in 1927. When he finally had the chance to play a full season in 1928, he batted .328 with 131 hits, 29 doubles, and 79 RBIs in 118 games.

In 1932, Foxx won the American League MVP award and he led the league in home runs and RBIs. That season he batted .364 with 213 hits, 33 doubles, 58 home runs, and 169 RBIs in 154 games. The next season he won his second American League MVP award and the Triple Crown, batting .356 with 204 hits, 37 doubles, 48 home runs, and 163 RBIs.

Foxx led the American League in home runs in 1935, his last season with the Athletics. Although he had eleven good years with Philadelphia, the Athletics sold his contract to the Boston Red Sox before the 1936 season. Foxx batted .338 in his first season with the Red Sox.

Foxx won his third American League MVP award in 1938. That season he batted .349 with 197 hits, 33 doubles, 50 home runs, and 175 RBIs in 149 games. The next year he led the league in home runs for the fourth and last time.

In 1942, Foxx became a reserve player with the Red Sox and he played in just 30 games with them before they traded him to the Chicago Cubs. He served in World War II in 1943 and returned in 1944 for fifteen games with Chicago before moving to the Philadelphia Phillies for his final season. In his last three years (1942, 1944-1945), Foxx's abilities diminished and he became a reserve player and a pinch hitter, playing in only twenty-four games in his last two seasons in the major leagues.

Foxx was a first baseman for most of his major league career. His career fielding statistics at first base include:

  • 1,919 games played
  • 155 errors
  • 1,222 assists
  • 1,528 double plays
  • 17,207 putouts
  • .992 fielding percentage

After he retired as a major league baseball player, Foxx was a player-manager in the minor leagues in 1947 and a manager in 1949.

Foxx played in over 100 games in each of 15 seasons (1928-1942). His statistics during that time include:

  • 12 seasons with 150 or more hits, with a high of 213 in 1932
  • 9 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 37 in 1933
  • 12 seasons with 30 or more home runs, with a high of 58 in 1932
  • 14 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 175 in 1938
  • 11 seasons with a batting average of .300 or better, with a high of .364 in 1932

Career statistics for Foxx include:

  • 2,317 games played
  • 2,646 hits
  • 458 doubles
  • 125 triples
  • 534 home runs
  • 1,922 RBIs
  • .325 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jimmie Foxx
ESPN Sports - Jimmie Foxx
Baseball Reference.com - Jimmie Foxx


Joe Cronin (1956)

Joe Cronin started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1925. A year later, he was with the Pittsburgh Pirates, playing in 38 games with them. The next year, his last one with the Pirates, he played in just 12 games. In 1928, Cronin moved to the Washington Senators. A year later, in 1929, his first full season in the major leagues, Cronin batted .281 with 139 hits and 29 doubles in 145 games.

Cronin led the American League in triples in 1932 with 18 and in doubles in 1933 with 45. He was made player-manager of the team in 1933 and in his two years as manager of the Senators, he had 165 wins to 139 losses.

In 1935, Cronin moved to the Boston Red Sox as player-manager. Although he ended his playing days with the 1945 season, he continued to manage the team through the 1947 season. In 1938, Cronin led the American League in doubles for the second time. That season he had a career high of 51 doubles.

From 1942 through 1945, his last season as a major league player, Cronin's playing time diminished. In his last season, he played in just three games with the Red Sox.

In addition to having a successful career as a player, Cronin had a good record as a manager. His overall record was 1,236 wins to 1,055 losses. He led the Washington Senators to an American League pennant in 1933 and he led the Red Sox to a pennant in 1946.

After retiring as manager of the Red Sox, Cronin was promoted to general manager, a position he held from 1947 until the beginning of 1959. From 1959 until 1973, he was president of the American League.

Statistics for Cronin in 13 full seasons (1929-1941) in the major leagues include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 203 in 1930
  • 11 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 51 in 1938
  • 4 seasons with over 10 triples, with a high of 18 in 1932
  • 8 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 126 in 1930 and 1931
  • 8 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .346 in 1930

Career statistics for Cronin include:

  • 2,124 games played
  • 2,285 hits
  • 515 doubles
  • 118 triples
  • 1,424 RBIs
  • .301 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Joe Cronin
ESPN Sports - Joe Cronin


Ted Williams (1966)

Ted Williams started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1936. Three years later, in 1939, he had his first season in the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox. That season he led the American League in RBIs and he batted .327 with 185 hits, 44 doubles, 31 home runs, and 145 RBIs.

In 1941, Williams won his first of six American League batting titles with a .406 batting average, a record that no other player in major league baseball has been able to beat. He also led the league in home runs with 37. The following year, he won a second batting title and he won the American League Triple Crown, leading the league in home runs, RBIs, and batting average. In 1942, Williams batted .356 with 186 hits, 34 doubles, 36 home runs, and 137 RBIs in 150 games.

From 1943-1945, Williams served in the United States Navy. When he returned to the Red Sox in 1946, he had another great season, winning the American League MVP award. That season he batted .342 with 176 hits, 37 doubles, 38 home runs, and 123 RBIs in 150 games. The following season he won his second American League Triple Crown with 32 home runs, 114 RBIs, and a .343 batting average.

Williams won his fourth American League batting title in 1948 with a .369 batting average. The next year, he won his second MVP award, leading the league in doubles, home runs, and RBIs. In 1949, Williams batted .343 with a career high 194 hits, 39 doubles, 43 home runs, and a career high 159 RBIs.

In 1957, Williams won his fifth American League batting title with a .388 batting average. He won his last batting title the next year with a .328 batting average. Williams ended his major league career as a player after hitting a home run in his final at bat on September 28, 1960.

Nine years after retiring as a baseball player, Williams returned in 1969 to manage the Washington Senators (now the Texas Rangers) for two years. His record as a manager was 273 wins to 364 losses.

Williams played in over 100 games in each of 15 seasons (1939-1942, 1946-1949, 1951, 1954, 1956-1960). His statistics during that time include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 194 in 1949
  • 8 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 44 in 1939 and 1948
  • 14 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 43 in 1949
  • 9 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 159 in 1949
  • 14 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .406 in 1941

Career statistics for Williams include:

  • 2,292 games played
  • 2,654 hits
  • 525 doubles
  • 521 home runs
  • 1,839 RBIs
  • .344 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Ted Williams
ESPN Sports - Ted Williams


Harry Hooper (1971)

Harry Hooper started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1907. After two seasons in the minors, he joined the Boston Red Sox in 1909. He batted .282 with 72 hits and 15 stolen bases in 81 games in his first season with the team. The following year, his first full season in the major leagues, Hooper batted .267 with 156 hits and 40 stolen bases in 155 games.

In 1911, Hooper had one of his best seasons with a .311 batting average and 163 hits, 20 doubles, and 38 stolen bases. In his twelve seasons with the Red Sox, Hooper set the team records for the most career triples and most career stolen bases.

Hooper joined the Chicago White Sox in 1921 and he played with them for five seasons before retiring from major league baseball after the 1925 season. He had a career high batting average of .328 in 1924. A year later, in his last season in the major leagues, Hooper had a .265 batting average in 127 games.

Statistics for Hooper in 17 seasons (1909-1925) in the major leagues include:

  • 8 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 183 in 1922
  • 3 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 35 in1922
  • 9 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 17 in 1920
  • 9 seasons with over 20 stolen bases, with a high of 40 in 1910
  • 5 seasons with a batting average over .300, with highs of .327 in 1921 and .328 in 1924

Career statistics for Hooper include:

  • 2,309 games played
  • 2,466 hits
  • 389 doubles
  • 160 triples
  • 375 stolen bases
  • .281 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Harry Hooper
ESPN Sports - Harry Hooper


Rick Ferrell (1984)

Rick Ferrell came from a baseball family, with one brother who also played major league baseball and another brother who played in the minor leagues. Ferrell was first signed by the Detroit Tigers in 1926 but he never played with them. They sent him to the minor leagues and in 1928, Ferrell petitioned for free agency. He signed with the St. Louis Browns in 1929 and he was their backup catcher that season, playing in 64 games with them.

In 1930, Ferrell was made the starting catcher for the Browns. That season he batted .268 with 84 hits and 18 doubles in 101 games. Three years later, in May, 1933, the Boston Red Sox bought Ferrell's contract. He played with the Red Sox for four seasons before being traded to the Washington Senators in June, 1937. He was traded again in 1941, this time back to the St. Louis Browns. He finished his major league career with the Washington Senators, returning to them in 1944. After two seasons with the Senators, Ferrell retired and spent the 1946 season as a coach with the Washington team. In 1947, he played again with the Senators, ending his major league career after 37 games that season.

Ferrell did not win any major league awards, but he set several records. Until 1988, he held the American League record for games caught with 1,806 games. That record was broken by Carlton Fisk in 1988. From 1933 through 1936, Ferrell held the records for Red Sox catchers for batting average, doubles, home runs, and RBIs.

Ferrell spent most of his major league career as a catcher. He was a good defensive player and his career fielding statistics as a catcher include:

  • 1,806 games played
  • 135 errors
  • 1,127 assists
  • 7,248 putouts
  • .984 fielding percentage

After he retired as a major league player, Ferrell was a coach for the Washington Senators. Later, he moved to the Detroit Tigers and served, at various times, as a coach, scout, general manager, and executive consultant.

Career batting statistics for Ferrell include:

  • 1,884 games played
  • 1,692 hits
  • 324 doubles
  • .281 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Rick Ferrell
ESPN Sports - Rick Ferrell
Baseball Reference.com - Rick Ferrell


Bobby Doerr (1986)

Bobby Doerr started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1934. A year later, he made his first start in the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox, playing in 55 games with them. In 1938, his first full season in the major leagues, Doerr batted .289 with 147 hits, 26 doubles, and 80 RBIs in 145 games.

In 1944, Doerr had a career high batting average of .325. The following season his career was interrupted by service in the United States army. Four years after returning to the Red Sox, in 1950, Doerr led the American League in triples with 11. The next season, his last season as a major league player, Doerr batted .289 in 106 games.

Doerr was a second baseman for most of his major league career. His career fielding statistics at second base include:

  • 1,852 games played
  • 214 errors
  • 5,710 assists
  • 1,507 double plays
  • 4,928 putouts
  • .980 fielding percentage

Several years after retiring as a major league baseball player, Doerr returned to the game as a scout for the Boston Red Sox (1957-1966). In 1967, he became the first base coach for the Red Sox, a position he held until 1969. Later, in 1977, he became a hitting coach for the Toronto Blue Jays, and he stayed in that position until 1981.

Statistics for Doerr in 13 full seasons (1938-1944, 1946-1961) in the major leagues include:

  • 9 seasons with 150 or more hits, with highs of 172 in 1950 and 173 in 1940
  • 6 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 37 in 1940
  • 4 seasons with 10 or more triples, with a high of 11 in 1950
  • 3 seasons with over 20 home runs, with a high of 27 in 1948 and 1950
  • 6 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 120 in 1950
  • 3 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .325 in 1944

Career statistics for Doerr include:

  • 1,865 games played
  • 2,042 hits
  • 381 doubles
  • 89 triples
  • 223 home runs
  • 1,247 RBIs
  • .288 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Bobby Doerr
ESPN Sports - Bobby Doerr
Baseball Reference.com - Bobby Doerr


Carl Yastrzemski (1989)

Carl Yastrzemski signed his first contract with the Boston Red Sox in 1959 when he was twenty years old. He played in the minor leagues for two years and made his first appearance with the Red Sox in the 1961 season. That year he batted .266 with 155 hits, 31 doubles, and 80 RBIs in 148 games.

In 1963, Yastrzemski was the American League batting leader, with a .321 average. Four years later, in 1967, he led the American League in batting again, this time with a .326 average, and he led the league in home runs with 44 and RBIs with 121. Yastrzemski received the American League MVP award and the Triple Crown for his accomplishments in 1967.

Yastrzemski was again the American League batting leader in 1968. The following two years, he hit 40 home runs each season and in 1970, Yastrzemski won the MVP award for the All-Star game. That year was his strongest and he ended the 1970 season with a .329 batting average.

Known as an excellent fielder, Yastrzemski won seven Gold Gloves. He won his first one as a left fielder in 1963 with just 6 errors, 284 putouts, and a .980 fielding percentage in 151 games. He won his other Gold Gloves in 1965, 1967-1969, 1971, 1977. Career fielding statistics for Yastrzemski as a left fielder include:

  • 1,912 games played
  • 68 errors
  • 177 assists
  • 3,521 putouts
  • .982 fielding percentage

Statistics for Yastrzemski in 23 seasons (1961-1983) in the major leagues include:

  • 13 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 191 in 1962
  • 8 seasons with 30 or more doubles, with a high of 45 in 1965
  • 8 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 44 in 1967
  • 5 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 121 in 1967
  • 6 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .329 in 1970

Career statistics for Yastrzemski include:

  • 3,308 games played
  • 3,419 hits
  • 646 doubles
  • 452 home runs
  • 1,844 RBIs
  • .285 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Carl Yastrzemski
ESPN Sports - Carl Yastrzemski
Baseball Reference.com - Carl Yastrzemski


Carlton Fisk (2000)

Carlton Fisk was drafted by the Boston Red Sox in 1967, but he didn't play full-time for them until 1972. Once he did become a regular Red Sox, he played consistently well. In his first full season in the major leagues, Fisk led the American League in triples and he won the American League Rookie of the Year award. In 1972, Fisk batted .293 with 134 hits, 28 doubles, and 22 home runs in 131 games.

Fisk played with the Red Sox until 1980. During that time, he was selected for the All-Star team seven times (1972-1974, 1976-1978, 1980). He became a free agent at the end of the 1980 season and the following March, he signed a new contract with another Sox team, the Chicago White Sox.

Fisk played even better with the White Sox and, in 1981, he won his first of three Silver Slugger awards. That season he batted .263 with 89 hits in 96 games. His other two Silver Slugger awards came in 1985, at the age of 38, and in 1988, at the age of 41. Unlike most players who begin to slow down after the age of 40, Fisk continued playing well until he retired at the age of 45. In his last five years as a player, Fisk hit 72 home runs.

Known as an excellent defensive catcher, Fisk won a Gold Glove in 1972. Career fielding statistics for Fisk include:

  • 2,226 games played
  • 155 errors
  • 1,048 assists
  • 11,369 putouts
  • .988 fielding percentage

Career batting statistics for Fisk include:

  • 2,499 games played
  • 2,356 hits
  • 421 doubles
  • 376 home runs
  • 1,330 RBIs
  • .269 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Carlton Fisk
ESPN Sports - Carlton Fisk
Baseball Reference.com - Carlton Fisk


Wade Boggs (2005)

Wade Boggs began his major league baseball career with the Boston Red Sox in 1982. He batted .349 with 118 hits in 104 games in his first season in the major leagues. The following year he won his first of five batting titles with a batting average of .361 and 210 hits. From 1982 until 1991, Boggs never had a batting average under .302.

Boggs won the American League batting title from 1985 through 1988. His highest batting average during that time was .368 in 1985. Boggs also won eight Silver Slugger awards (1983, 1986-1989, 1991, 1993, 1994) for his power hitting. One of his best seasons was 1985 when he had a career high of hits with 240 and a career high batting average of .368. In 1994, the year he won his last Silver Slugger award, he batted .342 with 125 hits and 19 doubles in 97 games.

In 1992, Boggs had a career low batting average of .259 and the next year, he began a five year partnership with the New York Yankees. During that time, Boggs batted over .300 for four of the five years and he won two Gold Glove awards (1994, 1995) for his fielding at third base. In 1995, Boggs made just 5 errors and had a .981 fielding percentage in 117 games.

Boggs left the Yankees at the end of 1997 and he played his last two years with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. He continued to bat well in those two years, with a batting average of .280 in 1998 and .301 in 1999.

Statistics for Boggs in 18 seasons (1982-1999) in the major leagues include:

  • 11 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 240 in 1985
  • 9 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 51 in 1989
  • 15 seasons with a batting average over .300, with a high of .368 in 1985

Career statistics for Boggs include:

  • 2,440 games played
  • 3,010 hits
  • 578 doubles
  • 1,014 RBIs
  • .328 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Wade Boggs
ESPN Sports - Wade Boggs
Baseball Reference.com - Wade Boggs


Jim Rice (2009)

Jim Rice started his professional baseball career in the minor leagues in 1973. The following season he won the AAA Rookie of the Year award, MVP award, and Triple Crown. He was called up to the Boston Red Sox that season and he played in twenty-four games with them. In 1975, Rice's first full season in the major leagues, he batted .309 with 174 hits, 29 doubles, 22 home runs, 102 RBIs, and 10 stolen bases in 144 games.

Rice played with the Red Sox for 16 seasons (1974-1989). During that time, he won two Silver Slugger awards (1983, 1984) and the American League MVP award in 1978. That season he batted .315 with 213 hits, 25 doubles, 15 triples, 46 home runs, and 139 RBIs in 163 games. Rice led the American League in home runs three times (1977, 1978, 1983) and in RBIs twice (1978, 1983).

In 1992, three years after retiring as a player, the Red Sox hired Rice as a batting coach and hitting instructor, a position he still holds. In 2003, he also worked as a TV sports commentator.

Rice played in over 100 games in each of 14 seasons (1975-1988). His statistics during that time include:

  • 10 seasons with over 150 hits, with a high of 213 in 1978
  • 3 seasons with over 30 doubles, with a high of 39 in 1979 and 1986
  • 11 seasons with 20 or more home runs, with a high of 46 in 1978
  • 8 seasons with over 100 RBIs, with a high of 139 in 1978
  • 7 seasons with a batting average over .300, with highs of .324 in 1986 and .325 in 1979

Career statistics for Rice include:

  • 2,089 games played
  • 2,452 hits
  • 373 doubles
  • 79 triples
  • 382 home runs
  • 1,451 RBIs
  • .298 batting average

Sources for Information
Wikipedia - Jim Rice
ESPN Sports - Jim Rice